Hubble Space Telescope

Since its launch in 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope has changed our fundamental understanding of the universe. Hubble’s unique design, allowing it to be repaired and upgraded with advanced technology by astronauts, has made it one of NASA’s longest-living and most valuable observatories. Today, Hubble continues to provide views of cosmic wonders never before seen and is still at the forefront of astronomy.


The Hubble Space Telescope is an international collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA).


For more information visit us at https://nasa.gov/hubble or follow us on social media @NASAHubble.

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Science

These videos feature some of the incredible Hubble Space Telescope scientific discoveries made over more than 30 years of observations.
  • We Asked NASA Scientists and Astronauts "What is your Favorite Hubble Image?"
    2021.08.05
    Over the years, Hubble video producer Paul Morris has had the amazing opportunity to interview some of the brightest minds in astrophysics, and some of the coolest astronauts and people in the world. As a rule, he always asked every single person this one question. Every single time: “What is your favorite Hubble image?” He began to see a pattern in their answers. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Additional Visualizations: Time Lapse of Sun Setting: Pond 5 Diatom Movement: Credit: Brenden Seah Hubble: Galaxies Across Space and Time: Credit: NASA, ESA and F. Summers (STScI) Music Credits: "’Children’s Games’ Piece for orchestra" by Georges Bizet [DP] via Koka Media [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. “Horn Romp” by Oded Fried-Gaon [ACUM] via 10 Miles [ACUM], and Universal Production Music. “Ever Onward” by Joel Goodman [ASCAP] via Medley Lane Music [ASCAP], and Universal Production Music. “Saving Earth” by Enrico Cacace [BMI] and Lorenzo Castellarin [BMI] via Atmosphere Music Ltd. [PRS], and Universal Production Music. “Solaris Planet” by Matthew Nicholson [PRS] and Shin Suzuma [PRS] via Ninja Tune Production Music [PRS], and Universal Production Music. “Dream of Stars” by Magnum Opus [ASCAP] via Sound Pocket Music [PRS], and Universal Production Music. “The Moldau (Exc. My Country)” by Bedrich Smetana [PD] via Koka Media [SACEM], and Universal Production Music.
  • Sonification of Hubble Ultra Deep Field (2014)
    2021.08.03
    This sonification of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (2014) image plays a note for each galaxy when it emitted the light captured in this image. The farther away the galaxy is, the longer its light has traveled before reaching the Hubble Space Telescope. In just under a minute, we can hear back nearly 13 billion years to the farthest galaxies in that photo. The light we receive from those galaxies was emitted when the universe was only a few hundred million years old. Sonification credits: SYSTEM Sounds (M. Russo, A. Santaguida) For more information about the Hubble Space Telescope and its images, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble.
  • The Hubble Deep Field: Looking Back In Time
    2021.08.02
    The Hubble Space Telescope has made over 1.5 million observations since its launch in 1990, capturing stunning subjects such as the Eagle Nebula and producing data that has been featured in almost 18,000 scientific articles. But no image has revolutionized the way we understand the universe as much as the Hubble Deep Field. Taken over the course of 10 days in 1995, the Hubble Deep Field captured roughly 3,000 distant galaxies varying in their stages of evolution, stunning the world. This video features some of the scientists and engineers that work on Hubble, and how the Hubble Deep Field changed everything. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Additional Visualizations: Compact galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Credit: ESA/Hubble (M. Kornmesser & L. L. Christensen) Pan of GOODS field containing distant dwarf galaxies forming stars at an incredible rate: Credit: NASA & ESA Hubble: Galaxies Across Space and Time: Credit: NASA, ESA and F. Summers (STScI) Speedthrough of galaxies added to deep field image: Credit: NASA/CXC/SAO/K.Arcand; Sonification: @SYSTEMSounds (M. Russo, A. Santaguida) Music Credits: "Earth’s Orbit" by Andreas Andreas Bolldén [STIM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. “Planetary Exploration” by Richard Andrew Canavan [PRS] via Sound Pocket Music [PRS], and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble Finds Evidence of Water Vapor at Jupiter’s Moon Ganymede
    2021.07.26
    Astronomers have used new and archival datasets from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to uncover evidence of water vapor in the atmosphere of Jupiter’s moon Ganymede. The vapor is present due to the thermal excitation of water molecules from the moon’s icy surface. Previous research has offered circumstantial evidence for the moon containing more water than all of Earth's oceans. However, temperatures there are so cold that water on the surface freezes and the ocean lies roughly 100 miles below the crust. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Paul Morris: Lead Producer Andrea Gianopoulos: Science Writer Tracy Vogel: Science Writer Additional Credits: Artist’s Impression of Ganymede: Credit: ESA/Hubble, M. Garlick Artist’s Impression of a Sublimated Water Atmosphere on Ganymede: Credit: ESA/Hubble, J. daSilva NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Observation of Ganymede in June 2021 Video Artist’s Impression of Ganymede: Credit: ESA/Hubble, M. Garlick Ganymede Spinning Globe: Credit: USGS Astrogeology Science Center Music Credits: "Mysterious Discoveries" by Bertrand Allagnat [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music.
  • NASA Returns Hubble to Science Operations
    2021.07.19
    On June 13, 2021, the Hubble Space Telescope’s payload computer unexpectedly came to a halt. However, the Hubble team methodically identified the possible cause and how to compensate for it. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Paul Morris: Lead Producer Music Credits: "New Opportunities 2" by Joel Goodman [ASCAP] via Medley Lane Music [ASCAP], and Universal Production Music. "Soaring Beyond" by Dan Phillipson [PRS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd. [PRS], and Universal Production Music.
  • Mystery of Galaxy's Missing Dark Matter Deepens
    2021.06.17
    When astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope uncovered an oddball galaxy that looks like it doesn’t have much dark matter, some thought the finding was hard to believe and looked for a simpler explanation. Dark matter, after all, is the invisible glue that makes up the bulk of the universe’s contents. All galaxies are dominated by it; in fact, galaxies are thought to form inside immense halos of dark matter. So, finding a galaxy lacking the invisible stuff is an extraordinary claim that challenges conventional wisdom. It would have the potential to upset theories of galaxy formation and evolution. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Additional Visualizations: Galaxy Motion Simulation: Credit: ESO/L. Calçada. Dark Matter Simulation: Credit: Additional Visualizations: Galaxy Motion Simulation: Credit: ESO/L. Calçada. Dark Matter Simulation: Credit: Wu, Hahn, Wechsler, Abel(KIPAC), Visualization: Kaehler (KIPAC) Music Credits: "Aphelion Horizon" by Alistair Hetherington [PRS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd. [PRS], and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble Tracks Origins Of Energy Blasts
    2021.05.20
    Fast radio bursts or FRBs, are extraordinary events that generate as much energy in a thousandth of a second as the Sun does in an entire year! Astronomers, using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have traced the locations of eight brief, powerful FRBs; five of which are near or on their host galaxy’s spiral arms. The research helped rule out some of the possible stellar objects originally thought to cause these brilliant flares. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Additional Visualizations: Sunrise over the Pacific: Artbeats Animation of Magnetar: Scott Wiessinger FRB Locations Animation: Scott Wiessinger and Chris Smith Gamma Ray Burst Illustration: Michael Starobin Neutron Star Merger: Michael Starobin Magnetar Flyby Animation: Chris Smith Magnetar Flare Sequence: Chris Smith Music Credits: "Deep Caverns" by JC Lemay [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble Science: Gravitational Lensing, Nature’s Boost
    2021.05.07
    For the past 31 years, the Hubble Space Telescope has continued its important mission of uncovering the mysteries of the universe. One of those mysteries that Hubble has helped us begin to understand is gravitational lensing. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Transitions” by Ben Niblett [PRS] and Jon Cotton [PRS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd. [PRS] and Universal Production Music. Extra Visualizations: Hubble Space Telescope Eclipses Sun: M. Kornmesser (ESA/Hubble)
  • Hubble's 31st Anniversary: Giant Star on the Edge of Destruction
    2021.04.23
    In celebration of the 31st anniversary of the launching of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers aimed the renowned observatory at a brilliant “celebrity star,” one of the brightest stars seen in our galaxy, surrounded by a glowing halo of gas and dust. Hubble's senior project scientist, Dr. Jennifer Wiseman, takes us on a tour of this stunning new image, describes the telescope's current health, and summarizes some of Hubble's contributions to astronomy from the past year. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Additional Visualizations: Flyby of AG Carinae Video credit: Leah Hustak, Frank Summers, Alyssa Pagan, Joseph DePasquale, Greg Bacon (STSci) Artist’s Impression of the Black Hole Concentration in NGC 6397 Video credit: ESA/Hubble, N. Bartmann Animation of of Exoplanet GJ 1132 b Video credit: Robert Hurt Music Credits: "Himalayan Temple" by Jan Pham Huu Tri [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble Shows Torrential Outflows from Infant Stars May Not Stop Them from Growing
    2021.03.18
    Though our galaxy is an immense city of at least 200 billion stars, the details of how they formed remain largely cloaked in mystery. Scientists know that stars form from the collapse of huge hydrogen clouds that are squeezed under gravity to the point where nuclear fusion ignites. But only about 30 percent of the cloud’s initial mass winds up as a newborn star. Where does the rest of the hydrogen go during such a terribly inefficient process? For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Paul Morris: Lead Producer Additional Visualizations: Zoom In To Star Formation: ESA, Silicon Worlds Wide Image of Orion Complex: Image courtesy of Rogelio Bernal Andreo, DeepSkyColors.com Herschel and Rosette Nebula: ESA - C. Carreau Space Cloud: ESA/Hubble (M. Kornmesser & L. L. Christensen) Zoom out of Milky Way: ESA, Silicon Worlds Music Credits: "Winter Solstice" by Laetitia Frenod [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music.
  • Distant Planet May Be On Its Second Atmosphere, NASA’s Hubble Finds
    2021.03.11
    Scientists using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have found evidence that a planet orbiting a distant star that may have lost its atmosphere but gained a second one through volcanic activity. The planet, GJ 1132 b, is hypothesized to have begun as a gaseous world with a thick hydrogen blanket of atmosphere. Starting out at several times the diameter of Earth, this so-called “sub-Neptune” is believed to have quickly lost its primordial hydrogen and helium atmosphere due to the intense radiation of the hot, young star it orbits. In a short period of time, such a planet would be stripped down to a bare core about the size of Earth. That’s when things got interesting. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Paul Morris: Lead Producer Additional Visualizations: Artist’s impression of Exoplanet GJ 1132 b: Robert Hurt Atmosphere escaping an exoplanet (artist’s impression): NASA, ESA, M. Kornmesser Artist’s impression of WASP-107b: ESA/Hubble, NASA, M. Kornmesser Video animation of of Exoplanet GJ 1132 b: Robert Hurt Aerial of oozing red lava in Hawaii: Artbeats Aerial from Puu Oo volcanic vents on Hawaii's Kilauea: Artbeats Exovolcano Animation Background Only: Michael Lentz Illustration depicting one interpretation of planet GJ 357 c: Chris Smith Music Credits: "Planetary Exploration" by Richard Andrew Canavan [PRS] via Sound Pocket Music [PRS], and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble Science: Exoplanets, Alien Atmospheres
    2021.02.22
    For the past 30 years the Hubble Space Telescope has continued its important mission of uncovering the mysteries of the universe. One of those mysteries that Hubble has helped us understand are exoplanets. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Videos & Images: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center European Space Agency Music Credits: “Transitions” by Ben Niblett [PRS] and Jon Cotton [PRS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd [PRS] and Universal Production Music. Extra Visualizations: Hubble CGI Hubble Rising + Door Opening: M. Kornmesser (ESA/Hubble) Water Vapor Planet: Credits: M. Kornmesser (ESA/Hubble)
  • Hubble Uncovers Concentration of Small Black Holes
    2021.02.11
    Astronomers on the hunt for an intermediate-mass black hole at the heart of the globular cluster NGC 6397, found something they weren’t expecting: a concentration of smaller black holes lurking there instead of one massive black hole. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "Glass Ships" by Chris Constantinou [PRS] and Paul Frazer [PRS] via Killer Tracks [BMI] and Universal Production Music. Visual Credits: Artist’s Impression of the Black Hole Concentration in NGC 6397 Video credit: ESA/Hubble, N. Bartmann Callout of the Black Hole Concentration in NGC 6397 Video credit: ESA/Hubble, N. Bartmann Artist Rendition of Gaia Spacecraft Image credit: ESA, C. Carreau
  • The Outer Planets: Hubble’s Continuing Legacy
    2020.12.15
    What is OPAL? OPAL (Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy) is a project to obtain long time baseline observations of the outer planets in order to understand their atmospheric dynamics and evolution as gas giants. The yearly observations from OPAL throughout the remainder of Hubble's operation will provide an important legacy of time-domain images for use by planetary scientists. Viewers might notice that some of the images of the same planets appear to be different colors. This is due to the fact that over the years, from Voyager to Hubble, many different instruments, and many different filters have been used. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “The Granted Wish” by Nicholas Techer [BMI] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. “Voyage Spectacular” by Rob Lane [PRS] via Abbey Road Masters [PRS], and Universal Production Music. “Celestial Waves” by Harry Vaman [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. “Solar Horizons” by David Rogers [PRS] and Paul Shaw [PRS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd [PRS], and Universal Production Music. “Visionary” by Andy Blythe [PRS] and Marten Joustra [PRS] via Ingenious Music Publishing Ltd. [PRS], and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble Science: Black Holes, From Myth to Reality
    2020.11.27
    For the past 30 years the Hubble Space Telescope has continued its important mission of uncovering the mysteries of the universe. One of those mysteries that Hubble has helped us understand are black holes. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Videos & Images: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center European Space Agency Music: “Transitions” by Ben Niblett [PRS] and Jon Cotton [PRS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd [PRS] and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble's Extraordinary ULLYSES Program
    2020.11.05
    The universe would be a pretty boring place without stars. Without them, the universe would remain a diffuse plasma of mostly hydrogen and helium from the big bang. To better understand stellar evolution, a new Hubble initiative has been launched called ULLYSES (UV Legacy Library of Young Stars as Essential Standards). This is the largest observing program ever undertaken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, which will be used to look at over 300 stars. Ultraviolet (UV) light from the target stars will be used to produce a library of the spectral fingerprints of young, low-mass stars from eight star-forming regions in the Milky Way, as well as fully mature high-mass stars in several nearby dwarf galaxies including the Magellanic Clouds. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "Red Giant" by Christian Tschuggnall [AKM] and Michael Edwards [APRA] via Atmosphere Music Ltd [PRS] and Universal Production Music
  • Hubble Spots Giant Space ‘Pumpkin’
    2020.10.29
    Halloween is scarier with Hubble! What looks like two glowing eyes and a crooked carved smile is a snapshot of the early stages of a collision between two galaxies. This new image is just one of several spooky views Hubble has captured in the universe. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Paul R. Morris (USRA): Lead Producer Music Credits: "Come Alive" by Donn Wilkerson [BMI] via Killer Tracks [BMI] and Universal Production Music Additional Credits: Video of Pumpkin by Artbeats Sound Effect Credits: Horror Hit by PashaStriker Scart Wobbling Effect by JiltedG Evil Gnome Laugh by WARP EFX
  • Hubble Makes Unexpected Dark Matter Discovery
    2020.09.10
    Astronomers seem to have revealed a puzzling detail in the way dark matter behaves. They found small, dense concentrations of dark matter that bend and magnify light much more strongly than expected. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Visualizations and Additional Footage: ESA/Hubble — Gravitational Lensing Animation ESA/Hubble — Gravitational Lensing Simplified Visualization R. Wesson/ESO — Very Large Telescope Footage Music Credits: “On the Path” by Bernhard Hering [GEMA] and Matthias Kruger [GEMA] via Berlin Production Music/Universal Production Music GmbH [GEMA]
  • Hubble Views the Moon to Study Earth
    2020.08.06
    Taking advantage of the total lunar eclipse of January 2019, astronomers, using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, have measured the amount of ozone in the Earth’s atmosphere. The method used serves as a proxy for how they will observe earthlike planets around other stars in search for worlds similar to our own. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Visualizations: NASA/GSFC: K. Kim — Moonbounce Animation ESA, NASA and L. Calçada (ESO) — Artist's concept of exoplanet orbiting Fomalhaut ESA, Hubble, M. Kornmesser —Absorption Lines & Exoplanets NASA/GSFC: Chris Smith — TOI 700 system transit Animation ESA, Hubble, M. Kornmesser & L. L. Christensen — HD 189733b transiting its parent star (artist's impression) ESA, ESO/L. Calçada, M. Kornmesser & L. L. Christensen (ESA/Hubble) — Exoplanet Transit Method Videos & Images: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center European Space Agency Space Telescope Science Institute January 2019 Moon Image taken by Kevin Hartnett Artbeats Stock Footage — Footage of leaf Pond5 Stock Footage — Footage of weeping willow footagefirm — Footage of sunrise and clouds Music Credits: “Life Unplanned” by Paul Saunderson [ PRS ]. Abbey Road Masters [ PRS ], and Universal Production Music
  • Hubble Spots Giant Flapping Shadow
    2020.06.25
    In 2017, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope captured an image of a huge wing-shaped shadow cast by a fledgling star’s unseen, planet-forming disk. The young star, called HBC 672, is casting the shadow across a more distant cloud in a star-forming region—like a fly wandering into the beam of a flashlight shining on a wall. Now, after observing the shadow again, astronomers report that they see the giant shadow flapping its "wings"! For more information about the Hubble Space Telescope and its images, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Floating Freefall” by Jason Steele [ ASCAP ]. Soundcast Music [ SESAC ] and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble Finds Evidence of Mid-Sized Black Hole
    2020.03.31
    Astronomers have identified a black hole of an elusive class known as “intermediate-mass,” which betrayed its existence by tearing apart a wayward star that passed too close. This exciting discovery opens the door to the possibility of many more lurking undetected in the dark, waiting to be given away by a star passing too close. For more information about the Hubble Space Telescope and its images, visit: https://nasa.gov/hubble Music Credits: “Struck by the Beauty” by Emmanuel David Lipszyc [SACEM], Sébastien Lipszyc [SACEM], and Thomas Bloch [SACEM]. Koka Media [SACEM], and Universal Production Music.
  • Happy Lunar New Year from Hubble
    2020.01.25
    Hubble welcomes the Year of the Rat with a view of its own favorite rodents, NGC 4676A and B, and highlights the planetary origins of the Chinese zodiac’s 12-year timetable. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Milky Way Travel” by July Tourret [SACEM]. Koka Media [SACEM], and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble's Scary New Halloween Image
    2019.10.28
    NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has unveiled a spooky new image staring out from the depths of the cosmos. The new image reveals the twin galaxies AM 2026-424 — a pair of interacting galaxies that may foreshadow our Milky Way’s own frightening fate. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "Bad and Spooky" by Brett Engel [ASCAP], Universal Production Music “Scream Dreams” by Matthew Harris [PRS], Universal Production Music
  • Hubble's New Image Of Interstellar Object
    2019.10.16
    NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has given astronomers their best look yet at an interstellar visitor – Comet 2I/Borisov – whose speed and trajectory indicates it is from outside of our Solar System. This Hubble image, taken on October 12, is the sharpest ever view of the comet. Hubble reveals a central concentration of dust around the solid icy nucleus. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "Solar Pilgrims" by Francois Vey [ SACEM ] Universal Production Music
  • Hubble Finds Water Vapor On Distant Exoplanet
    2019.09.11
    With data from the Hubble Space Telescope, water vapor has been detected in the atmosphere of a super-Earth within the habitable zone of its host star. K2-18b, which is eight times the mass of Earth, is the only planet orbiting a star outside the solar system (or “exoplanet”) within the habitable zone. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Paul R. Morris (USRA): Lead Producer Music credits: "Only Human" by Guillaume Bernard [SACEM]; Universal Production Music
  • Hubble’s Brand New Image of Saturn
    2019.09.12
    This new Hubble Space Telescope view of Saturn, taken in late June of 2019, reveals the giant planet's iconic rings. Saturn’s amber colors come from summer smog-like hazes, produced in photochemical reactions driven by solar ultraviolet radiation. Below the haze lie clouds of ammonia ice crystals, as well as deeper, unseen lower-level clouds of ammonium hydrosulfide and water. The planet’s banded structure is caused by winds and clouds at different altitudes. Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 observed Saturn on June 20, 2019, as the planet made its closest approach to Earth, at about 845 million miles away. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Paul R. Morris (USRA): Lead Producer Music credits: "Momentum" by Guillaume Bernard [SACEM]; Killer Tracks Production Music
  • Hubble’s Brand New Image of Jupiter
    2019.08.08
    This new Hubble Space Telescope view of Jupiter, taken on June 27, 2019, reveals the giant planet's trademark Great Red Spot, and a more intense color palette in the clouds swirling in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years. The colors, and their changes, provide important clues to ongoing processes in planetary atmospheres. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Paul Morris/Tracy Vogel Music credits: "Solaris" by Axel Tenner [GEMA], Michael Schluecker [GEMA] and Raphael Schalz [GEMA]; Killer Tracks Production Music
  • Hubble’s Brand New Image of Eta Carinae
    2019.07.01
    In the mid-1800s, mariners sailing the southern seas navigated at night by a brilliant star in the constellation Carina. The star, named Eta Carinae, was the second brightest star in the sky for more than a decade. Those mariners could hardly have imagined that by the mid-1860s the brilliant orb would no longer be visible. Eta Carinae was enveloped by a cloud of dust ejected during a violent outburst named “The Great Eruption.” Because of Eta Carinae's violent history, astronomers have kept watch over its activities. Although Hubble has monitored the volatile superstar for 25 years, it still is uncovering new revelations. Using Hubble to map the ultraviolet-light glow of magnesium embedded in warm gas, astronomers were surprised to discover the gas in places they had not seen it before. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Paul Morris. Music credits: "Transcode" by Lee Groves [PRS], and Peter George Marett [PRS]; Killer Tracks Production Music
  • Hubble Evidence of Possible Exomoon
    2018.10.03
    Astronomers Find First Evidence of Possible Moon Outside Our Solar System Neptune-Sized Satellite Orbits A Giant Jupiter Around a Sunlike Star Our solar system has eight major planets, and nearly 200 moons. Though astronomers have to date found nearly 4,000 planets orbiting other stars, no moons have yet been found. That hasn’t been for any lack of looking, it’s just that moons are smaller than planets and therefore harder to detect. The Hubble and Kepler space telescopes found evidence for what could be a giant moon accompanying a gas-giant planet that orbits the star Kepler-1625, located 8,000 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus. The moon may be as big as Neptune and it orbits a planet several times more massive than Jupiter. Read the NASA press release at https://nasa.gov/press-release/astronomers-find-first-evidence-of-possible-moon-outside-our-solar-system Find the science paper at advances.sciencemag.org/ Visuals are also available at HubbleSite.org. Watch the scientists explain their research - https://youtu.be/eGjgD27Dtpc, https://youtu.be/vlcc2MdYaik
  • Is 'Oumuamua an Interstellar Asteroid or Comet?
    2018.06.27
    Observatories including NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope found that the interstellar object named ‘Oumuamua gained an extra boost of speed, which likely comes from comet-like jets of gas. Read the full story here: nasa.gov Find more Hubble visuals here: hubblesite.org Find the science paper in Nature here: nature.com
  • Hubble Views a Galaxy Lacking Dark Matter
    2018.03.28
    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took an image of a bizarre, ghostly looking galaxy called NGC 1052-DF2 that astronomers calculate to have little to no dark matter. This is the first galaxy astronomers have discovered to be so lacking in dark matter, which is thought to comprise 85% of our universe's mass. Read the full story at nasa.gov. Download the release images at HubbleSite.org. Find the science paper at nature.com.
  • Hubble Observes Atmospheres of TRAPPIST-1 Exoplanets in the Habitable Zone
    2018.02.05
    Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have conducted the first spectroscopic survey of Earth-sized planets in the TRAPPIST-1 system's habitable zone. Hubble reveals that at least the inner five planets do not seem to contain puffy, hydrogen-rich atmospheres similar to gaseous planets such as Neptune. This means the atmospheres may be more shallow and rich in heavier gases like carbon dioxide, methane, and oxygen. Find the full story and press release at hubblesite.org. Read the joint Hubble and Spitzer findings on nasa.gov. The science paper is available from Nature Astronomy.
  • Hubble Watches Neptune's Dark Storm Die
    2018.02.15
    For the first time, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured time-lapse images of a large, dark storm on Neptune shrinking out of existence. A recent Hubble program called Outer Planets Atmosphere Legacy, or OPAL, provides yearly global maps of our gas giant planets, allowing planetary scientists to view changes in formations such as Neptune's dark storms. Read the full story on NASA.gov. View the full image release at HubbleSite.org. Find the science paper here. Additional resources: Neptune imagery - JPL Photojournal Voyager b-roll - NASA Image and Video Library OPAL information and data - OPAL website Voyager information - voyager.jpl.nasa.gov
  • Hubble Captures Supernova's Light Echo
    2017.11.09
    Over a period of two and a half years, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope observed the "light echo" of supernova SN 2014J in galaxy M82, located 11.4 million light-years away. Read the web story on nasa.gov. Download the full image release on hubblesite.org.
  • Hubble Sees First-Time Icy Visitor Comet K2
    2017.09.28
    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope observed the farthest-discovered active inbound comet, Comet K2. K2 came from the distant Oort Cloud and is visiting our inner solar system for the first (and only) time. Since we're seeing it so far away, past the orbit of Saturn, K2 is still in its early phase of activity, likely making it the most primitive comet anyone has ever seen. Read the web story on nasa.gov. Download the Hubble images on HubbleSite.org. Read the science paper here.
  • Star Gives Birth to Possible Black Hole in Hubble and Spitzer Images
    2017.05.25
    A team of astronomers at The Ohio State University watched a star disappear and possibly become a black hole. Instead of becoming a black hole through the expected process of a supernova, the black hole candidate formed through a "failed supernova." The team used NASA's Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes and the Large Binocular Telescope to observe and monitor the star throughout the past decade. If confirmed, this would be the first time anyone has witnessed the birth of a black hole and the first discovery of a failed supernova. Read the NASA web feature here. Find the full image release package at HubbleSite.org. Read the full science paper in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
  • Hubble's Galaxy-Observing Superpowers
    2017.05.04
    The Hubble Space Telescope is keeping watch over many, many galaxies using the combined superpowers of its incredible optics and a quirk of nature called gravitational lensing. The full image package for galaxy cluster Abell 370 is available on the HubbleSite. Learn more about the Frontier Fields program at http://www.stsci.edu/hst/campaigns/frontier-fields/
  • Europa Water Vapor Plumes - More Hubble Evidence
    2017.04.13
    The Hubble Space Telescope has captured even more evidence of water vapor plumes on Jupiter's icy moon Europa. The probable plumes appear to be repeating in the same location and correspond with a relatively warm region on Europa's surface observed by the Galileo spacecraft. Read the press release here - https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-missions-provide-new-insights-into-ocean-worlds-in-our-solar-system View the release images on the HubbleSite here - http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2017-17 Read the science paper here - http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/aa67f8/pdf
  • Hubble Views Jupiter at Opposition
    2017.04.06
    The Hubble Space Telescope observed Jupiter on April 3rd, 2017 - just days before Jupiter is in opposition on April 7th. This new image of Jupiter is part of Hubble's Outer Planets Atmospheres Legacy program, which is one of many ways Hubble provides science on the Jupiter system. View the NASA.gov web story here - nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/hubble-takes-close-up-portrait-of-jupiterE View the HubbleSite release images here - hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2017-15 Learn more about Hubble's OPAL program here - archive.stsci.edu/prepds/opal/ Learn more about NASA's Juno mission here - nasa.gov/juno Learn more about NASA's planned Europa Clipper mission here - nasa.gov/europa
  • Hubble Detects a Rogue Supermassive Black Hole
    2017.03.23
    The Hubble Space Telescope captured an image of a quasar named 3C 186 that is offset from the center of its galaxy. Astronomers hypothesize that this supermassive black hole was jettisoned from the center of its galaxy by the recoil from gravitational waves produced by the merging of two supermassive black holes. Read the press release here - https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/feature/gravitational-wave-kicks-monster-black-hole-out-of-galactic-core Download the Hubble images here - http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2017-12 Read the science paper here - http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hvi/uploads/science_paper/file_attachment/231/3c186.pdf
  • Hubble Directly Images Possible Plumes on Europa
    2016.09.26
    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took direct ultraviolet images of the icy moon Europa transiting across the disk of Jupiter. Out of ten observations, Hubble saw what may be water vapor plumes on three of the images. This adds another piece of supporting evidence to the existence of water vapor plumes on Europa - Hubble also detected spectroscopic signatures of water vapor in 2012. The existence of water vapor plumes could provide NASA's Europa flyby mission the opportunity to study the conditions and habitability of Europa's subsurface ocean. Read the full nasa.gov story here: http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-s-hubble-spots-possible-water-plumes-erupting-on-jupiters-moon-europa Read the full science paper here: http://hubblesite.org/pubinfo/pdf/2016/33/pdf.pdf Full details on the images can be found on HubbleSite.org: http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/33/ Additional Resources: JPL's "Europa: Tempting Target for Future Exploration" video file is downloadable here: https://vimeo.com/118505538 Read the Dec 2013 press release about Hubble's previous observations of Europa here: http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/hubble-europa-water-vapor
  • Hubble Explores the Final Frontier
    2016.07.21
    In celebration of Star Trek's new movie and 50th anniversary, the Hubble Space Telescope is sharing its newest Frontier Field image, which uses a clever trick from nature to boldly observe what no telescope has observed before.
  • Hubble Makes First Measurements of Earth-Sized Exoplanet Atmospheres
    2016.07.20
    On May 4th, 2016, the Hubble Space Telescope made the first spectroscopic measurements of two of the three known Earth-sized exoplanets in the TRAPPIST-1 system just 40 light-years away. Now the results are in: a thick, puffy, hydrogen-helium atmosphere is likely ruled out from the possible range of atmospheres for these two planets. Additional visuals from the European Southern Observatory can be downloaded here: http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1615/E
  • Hubble's New View of Mars and Planets
    2016.05.19
    The Hubble Space Telescope is more well known for its picturesque views of nebulae and galaxies, but it's also useful for studying our own planets, including Mars. Hubble imaged Mars on May 12, 2016 - ten days before Mars would be on the exact opposite side of the Earth from the Sun. View the full image release here: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/hubble-takes-mars-portrait-near-close-approach
  • Hubble Discovers Moon Orbiting Dwarf Planet Makemake
    2016.04.26
    Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope discovered a moon orbiting dwarf planet Makemake -- the third largest known object past the orbit of Neptune, about two thirds the size of Pluto. Further observations of this moon may allow astronomers to calculate Makemake's mass, which will give them a better idea of its density and thus its bulk composition. The Hubble Space Telescope has been instrumental in studying our outer solar system; it also discovered four of the five moons orbiting Pluto.
  • NASA Missions Take an Unparalleled Look into Superstar Eta Carinae
    2015.01.07
    Eta Carinae is a binary system containing the most luminous and massive star within 10,000 light-years. A long-term study led by astronomers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, combined data from NASA satellites, ground-based observing campaigns and theoretical modeling to produce the most comprehensive picture of Eta Carinae to date. New findings include Hubble Space Telescope images that show decade-old shells of ionized gas racing away from the largest star at a million miles an hour, and new 3-D models that reveal never-before-seen features of the stars' interactions. Located about 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation of Carina, Eta Carinae comprises two massive stars whose eccentric orbits bring them unusually close every 5.5 years. Both produce powerful gaseous outflows called stellar winds, which enshroud the stars and stymy efforts to directly measure their properties. Astronomers have established that the brighter, cooler primary star has about 90 times the mass of the sun and outshines it by 5 million times. While the properties of its smaller, hotter companion are more contested, Goddard's Ted Gull and his colleagues think the star has about 30 solar masses and emits a million times the sun's light. At closest approach, or periastron, the stars are 140 million miles (225 million kilometers) apart, or about the average distance between Mars and the sun. Astronomers observe dramatic changes in the system during the months before and after periastron. These include X-ray flares, followed by a sudden decline and eventual recovery of X-ray emission; the disappearance and re-emergence of structures near the stars detected at specific wavelengths of visible light; and even a play of light and shadow as the smaller star swings around the primary. During the past 11 years, spanning three periastron passages, the Goddard group has developed a model based on routine observations of the stars using ground-based telescopes and multiple NASA satellites. According to this model, the interaction of the two stellar winds accounts for many of the periodic changes observed in the system. The winds from each star have markedly different properties: thick and slow for the primary, lean and fast for the hotter companion. The primary's wind blows at nearly 1 million mph and is especially dense, carrying away the equivalent mass of our sun every thousand years. By contrast, the companion's wind carries off about 100 times less material than the primary's, but it races outward as much as six times faster. The images and videos on this page include periastron observations from NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, the X-Ray Telescope aboard NASA's Swift, the Hubble Space Telescope's STIS instrument, and computer simulations. See the captions for details.
  • Hubble, Swift Detect First-ever Changes in an Exoplanet Atmosphere
    2012.06.28
    An international team of astronomers using data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected significant changes in the atmosphere of a planet located beyond our solar system. The scientists conclude the atmospheric variations occurred in response to a powerful eruption on the planet's host star, an event observed by NASA's Swift satellite.

    The exoplanet is HD 189733b, a gas giant similar to Jupiter, but about 14 percent larger and more massive. The planet circles its star at a distance of only 3 million miles, or about 30 times closer than Earth's distance from the sun, and completes an orbit every 2.2 days. Its star, named HD 189733A, is about 80 percent the size and mass of our sun.

    Astronomers classify the planet as a "hot Jupiter." Previous Hubble observations show that the planet's deep atmosphere reaches a temperature of about 1,900 degrees Fahrenheit (1,030 C).

    HD 189733b periodically passes across, or transits, its parent star, and these events give astronomers an opportunity to probe its atmosphere and environment. In a previous study, a group led by Lecavelier des Etangs used Hubble to show that hydrogen gas was escaping from the planet's upper atmosphere. The finding made HD 189733b only the second-known "evaporating" exoplanet at the time.

    The system is just 63 light-years away, so close that its star can be seen with binoculars near the famous Dumbbell Nebula. This makes HD 189733b an ideal target for studying the processes that drive atmospheric escape.

    When HD 189733b transits its star, some of the star's light passes through the planet's atmosphere. This interaction imprints information on the composition and motion of the planet's atmosphere into the star's light.

    In April 2010, the researchers observed a single transit using Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), but they detected no trace of the planet's atmosphere. Follow-up STIS observations in September 2011 showed a surprising reversal, with striking evidence that a plume of gas was streaming away from the exoplanet.

    The researchers determined that at least 1,000 tons of gas was leaving the planet's atmosphere every second. The hydrogen atoms were racing away at speeds greater than 300,000 mph.

    Because X-rays and extreme ultraviolet starlight heat the planet's atmosphere and likely drive its escape, the team also monitored the star with Swift's X-ray Telescope (XRT). On Sept. 7, 2011, just eight hours before Hubble was scheduled to observe the transit, Swift was monitoring the star when it unleashed a powerful flare. It brightened by 3.6 times in X-rays, a spike occurring atop emission levels that already were greater than the sun's. Astronomers estimate that HD 189733b encountered about 3 million times as many X-rays as Earth receives from a solar flare at the threshold of the X class.

  • Reviving Fomalhaut b
    2012.10.25
    A second look at data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is reanimating the claim that the nearby star Fomalhaut hosts a massive exoplanet. The study suggests that the planet, named Fomalhaut b, is a rare and possibly unique object that is completely shrouded by dust.

    Fomalhaut is the brightest star in the constellation Piscis Austrinus and lies 25 light-years away.

    In November 2008, Hubble astronomers announced the exoplanet, named Fomalhaut b, as the first one ever directly imaged in visible light around another star. The object was imaged just inside a vast ring of debris surrounding but offset from the host star. The planet's location and mass — about three times Jupiter's — seemed just right for its gravity to explain the ring's appearance.

    Recent studies have claimed that this planetary interpretation is incorrect. Based on the object's apparent motion and the lack of an infrared detection by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, they argue that the object is a short-lived dust cloud unrelated to any planet.

    A new analysis, however, brings the planet conclusion back to life.

  • Astronomers Uncover a Surprising Trend in Galaxy Evolution
    2012.10.19
    A comprehensive study of hundreds of galaxies observed by the Keck telescopes in Hawaii and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has revealed an unexpected pattern of change that extends back 8 billion years, or more than half the age of the universe.

    "Astronomers thought disk galaxies in the nearby universe had settled into their present form by about 8 billion years ago, with little additional development since," said Susan Kassin, an astronomer at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and the study's lead researcher. "The trend we've observed instead shows the opposite, that galaxies were steadily changing over this time period."

    Today, star-forming galaxies take the form of orderly disk-shaped systems, such as the Andromeda Galaxy or the Milky Way, where rotation dominates over other internal motions. The most distant blue galaxies in the study tend to be very different, exhibiting disorganized motions in multiple directions. There is a steady shift toward greater organization to the present time as the disorganized motions dissipate and rotation speeds increase. These galaxies are gradually settling into well-behaved disks.

    Blue galaxies — their color indicates stars are forming within them — show less disorganized motions and ever-faster rotation speeds the closer they are observed to the present. This trend holds true for galaxies of all masses, but the most massive systems always show the highest level of organization.

    Researchers say the distant blue galaxies they studied are gradually transforming into rotating disk galaxies like our own Milky Way.

  • Swift and Hubble Probe an Asteroid Crash
    2011.04.28
    Late last year, astronomers noticed that an asteroid named Scheila had unexpectedly brightened and it was sporting short-lived plumes. Data from NASA's Swift satellite and Hubble Space Telescope show that these changes likely occurred after Scheila was struck by a much smaller asteroid.

    On Dec. 11, 2010, images from the University of Arizona's Catalina Sky Survey, a project of NASA's Near Earth Object Observations Program, revealed the Scheila to be twice as bright as expected and immersed in a faint comet-like glow. Looking through the survey's archived images, astronomers inferred the outburst began between Nov. 11 and Dec. 3.

    Three days after the outburst was announced, Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) captured multiple images and a spectrum of the asteroid. Ultraviolet sunlight breaks up the gas molecules surrounding comets; water, for example, is transformed into hydroxyl (OH) and hydrogen (H). But none of the emissions most commonly identified in comets — such as hydroxyl or cyanogen (CN) — show up in the UVOT spectrum. The absence of gas around Scheila led the Swift team to reject scenarios where exposed ice accounted for the activity.

    Images show the asteroid was flanked in the north by a bright dust plume and in the south by a fainter one. The dual plumes formed as small dust particles excavated by the impact were pushed away from the asteroid by sunlight. Hubble observed the asteroid's fading dust cloud on Dec. 27, 2010, and Jan. 4, 2011.

    The two teams found the observations were best explained by a collision with a small asteroid impacting Scheila's surface at an angle of less than 30 degrees, leaving a crater 1,000 feet across. Laboratory experiments show a more direct strike probably wouldn't have produced two distinct dust plumes. The researchers estimated the crash ejected more than 660,000 tons of dust—equivalent to nearly twice the mass of the Empire State Building.

    For the collision animation go to #10759.

History

These fully produced Hubble web shorts go over the telescope's history, capabilities, or the people involved with its success.
  • Lyman Spitzer: Making Space For Hubble
    2021.07.30
    Seventy-five years ago, astronomer Lyman Spitzer envisioned a future for space exploration that deepened humanity’s curiosity about the cosmos. A visionary behind the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer was among the earliest astronomers pioneering a revolutionary way to explore the universe through astronomical satellites. His vision came over a decade before the launch of the first satellite, Sputnik, as well as the establishment of NASA itself. While the fundamental concept of sending a large telescope into space wasn’t new, the reality of doing so was.Seventy-five years ago, astronomer Lyman Spitzer envisioned a future for space exploration that deepened humanity’s curiosity about the cosmos. A visionary behind the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer was among the earliest astronomers pioneering a revolutionary way to explore the universe through astronomical satellites. His vision came over a decade before the launch of the first satellite, Sputnik, as well as the establishment of NASA itself. While the fundamental concept of sending a large telescope into space wasn’t new, the reality of doing so was. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Paul Morris: Lead Producer Anisha Engineer: Lead Writer Grace Weikert: Narration Image Credits of Dr. Spitzer: The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Don Morton Denise Applewhite Music Credits: "Lead Train" by Sebastian Barnaby Robertson [BMI] and Tristan Calder [ASCAP] via Killer Tracks [BMI], Soundcast Music [SESAC], and Universal Production Music.
  • Live Interview from International Space Station with Hubble Astronaut Megan McArthur
    2021.06.02
    Astronaut Megan McArthur speaks with us from the International Space Station! We’ll discuss her role on the Hubble mission and her current work as part of NASA’s SpaceX Crew-2.
  • Ahead of its Time: Hubble’s Control Center
    2021.02.12
    Dedicated on February 14th, 1984, at NASA Goddard’s Space Flight Center, the STOCC, or the Space Telescope Operations Control Center, operates the Hubble Space Telescope on its important mission. The Operations Team members at the STOCC continue to operate the telescope, capturing data and images of the cosmos for all of us to enjoy, allowing Hubble to continue its mission of unravelling the mysteries of the universe. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "Heroes Welcome" by John K. Sands [BMI], Marc Ferrari [BMI], and Michael A Tremante [ASCAP] via Base Camp [BMI], Big Sands Music [ASCAP], and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble's 30th Anniversary Celebration
    2020.12.23
    In 2020, the Hubble Space Telescope achieved its 30th year in orbit. Hubble’s unique design, allowing it to be repaired and upgraded with advanced technology by astronauts, has made it one of NASA’s longest-living and most valuable space-based observatories, beaming transformational astronomical images to Earth for decades. Hubble has fundamentally changed our understanding of the cosmos, and its story — filled with challenges overcome by innovation, determination, and the human spirit — inspires us. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "One Destiny" by Mark Petrie [ASCAP] via Soundcast Music [SESAC] and Universal Production Music “Never Give Up” by Michael James Burns [PRS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd [PRS] and Universal Production Music
  • Hubble: Voyage of Discovery
    2020.11.20
    The Hubble Space Telescope has transformed our understanding of the universe, its view from orbit unleashing a flood of cosmic discoveries that have changed astronomy forever. From its discovery of dark energy to its quest to determine the age of the universe, Hubble has helped answer some of the most compelling astronomical questions of our time and revealed even stranger phenomena, opening our eyes to the grandeur and mystery of space. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Paul R. Morris (USRA): Lead Producer Tracy Vogel: Lead Writer Music Credits: "Above the Stars" by Magnum Opus [ ASCAP ] Universal Production Music
  • Hubble Celebrates World Wildlife Day
    2021.03.03
    To celebrate 2021's World Wildlife Day, the Hubble Space Telescope wanted to share all of the best "animal" images taken over the years. From giant tadpole galaxies to the famed Eagle Nebula, there are all kinds of "animals" in space! For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Image Credits: Picture of Eagle by Eliot Malumuth Picture of Horse by Maria Zubareva via Motion Array Video Credits: White Mouse in Hands by Misharin via Motion Array Sand Crab Scavenging via monster/Pond5 Underwater Frog Tadpole via MPS_Images/Pond5 Whale in Ocean via VideoFort/Pond5 Music Credits: “Fröhlicher Bummler” by Conny Schumann [GEMA], via Ed. Beco Tapes [GEMA] and Universal Production Music
  • Hubble and Whale Sharks?
    2020.08.11
    While you might not think that sharks and the Hubble Space Telescope have a lot in common, it turns out they share an incredible bond! For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Paul Morris (USRA): Lead Producer Videos, Images, and Audio Effects: Page Turning Whoosh by dauzkobza via Motion Array Wind by LuLuProduction via Motion Array Camera Sound Pack 1 by Blue Kangaroo via Motion Array Crunchy Bite SFX Pack by WARP EFX via Motion Array Water Splash by Motion Audio via Motion Array Flying Through the Realistic Clouds(Left-Right) by MambaTV via Motion Array POV Water Surface by v_creative via Motion Array Ding by Media_M via Motion Array Bell Ding by dauzkobza via Motion Array Whoosh Pack by BANT via Motion Array Cartoon Love Elements by FXBox via Motion Array Shining Hearts Animation by action_7 via Motion Array Pop Up by Motion Audio via Motion Array Polaroid Photos Opener by Rocksolid via Motion Array Underwater by erhnbcc via Motion Array Whale Shark by Alexpunker via Motion Array Whale Shark At Surface by Alexpunker via Motion Array Whale Shark In Ocean by Alexpunker via Motion Array Whale Shark At Sea by Alexpunker via Motion Array Shark by designprojects via Motion Array Fingerprints Background by Alex39 via Motion Array Whale Shark Still Image by Amber Cook Whale Shark Video with Diver by Tom Campbell Music Credits: “Happy Tulip” by Stéphane Caisson [ SACEM ]. Koka Media [ SACEM ], Universal Publishing Production Music France [ SACEM ], and Universal Production Music
  • Hubble’s Universe: Intergalactic Elegance
    2020.07.02
    Hubble has seen galaxies at the edge of the visible universe. It has unlocked a cosmos so vast and filled with wonder that it boggles the mind. The Hubble Telescope has learned how galaxies merge, and found the powerful jets from massive black-holes. It has uncovered the “dark energy” behind universal expansion and mapped the dark matter that connects galaxies. Through it all, it has revealed an intergalactic elegance that stretches across the universe. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Silver Lining” by Bernhard Hering [GEMA] and Matthias Kruger [GEMA]. Ed Berlin Production Music and Universal Production Music
  • Hubble’s Universe: Milky Way Marvels
    2020.07.01
    30 years ago, the Hubble Space Telescope unlocked a window on the universe. Through that window we’ve seen the wonders of our Milky Way and expanded our vision across the galaxy. From the birth and death of stars to the baby pictures of planets, these are some of Hubble’s Milky Way marvels. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Limitless” by Andre Tavarez [BMI], Sebastian Barnaby Robertson [BMI] Universal Production Music
  • Hubble’s Universe: Solar System Surprises
    2020.06.30
    Celebrating 30 years in orbit, The Hubble Space Telescope has revealed astonishing secrets about our universe. Yet, while its most famous pictures may reveal galaxies and nebulas across the cosmos, it’s also unlocked secrets here in our own solar system. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Minimal Fiber (Loop)” Paul Lipson [BMI]. Universal Production Music
  • Hubble’s 30th Year in Orbit
    2020.04.27
    On April 24, 2020, the Hubble Space Telescope celebrated its 30th year in orbit by premiering a never-before-seen view of two stunning nebulas named NGC 2020 and NGC 2014. Even after all these years, Hubble continues to uncover the mysteries of the universe. These are a few science achievements from Hubble’s latest year in orbit. For more information about the Hubble Space Telescope and its images, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Twist of Fate” by Axel Tenner [GEMA], Michael Schluecker [GEMA], and Raphael Schalz [GEMA]. Berlin Production Music and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble’s 30th Anniversary Image
    2020.04.24
    On April 24, 2020, the Hubble Space Telescope celebrated its 30th year in orbit by premiering a never-before-seen view of two beautiful nebulas named NGC 2020 and NGC 2014. Hubble’s Senior Project Scientist Dr. Jennifer Wiseman takes us on a tour of this stunning new image, describes the telescope's current health, and summarizes some of Hubble's contributions to astronomy during its 30-year career. For more information about the Hubble Space Telescope and its images, visit nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Perpetual Twilight” by Christophe La Pinta [SACEM], Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music.
  • How Hubble’s Servicing Mission 3A Saved the Day
    2019.12.19
    After Hubble’s important gyroscopes began to fail, a Hubble emergency was declared and Servicing Mission 3 was quickly split into two separate launches. So on December 19, 1999, the brave crew of Space Shuttle Discovery lifted off to switch out the broken gyros and get Hubble working again. The mission was an incredible success, and thanks to everyone involved with SM3A, the Hubble Space Telescope was able to do science once again and open the world to the mysteries of the universe. To celebrate SM3A’s 20 year anniversary, this video gives a quick and in-depth review on the accomplishments of this historic mission. The tools and the knowledge gleaned from SM3A are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars. For more information, visit: https://nasa.gov/hubble Music Credits: -”Run to the Hills” by Magnum Opus [ ASCAP ], Atmosphere Music Ltd. [ PRS], Universal Production Music -“Crystalised Fortune” by Paul Leonard Morgan [ PRS ], Universal Production Music -“History in Motion” by Fred Dubois [ SACEM ], Koka Media [ SACEM ], Universal Production Music
  • Hubble: Voyage of Discovery
    2020.11.20
    The Hubble Space Telescope has transformed our understanding of the universe, its view from orbit unleashing a flood of cosmic discoveries that have changed astronomy forever. From its discovery of dark energy to its quest to determine the age of the universe, Hubble has helped answer some of the most compelling astronomical questions of our time and revealed even stranger phenomena, opening our eyes to the grandeur and mystery of space. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Paul R. Morris (USRA): Lead Producer Tracy Vogel: Lead Writer Music Credits: "Above the Stars" by Magnum Opus [ ASCAP ] Universal Production Music
  • Hubble Celebrates Spitzer's 16th Birthday
    2019.08.25
    To celebrate Spitzer's 16th birthday, the Hubble Space Telescope team decided to put together a special present for their fellow "observing buddy." Hubble and Spitzer have observed many of the same astronomical objects over the years; and with Spitzer getting data from infrared, and Hubble getting data from visible, ultraviolet, and some near-infrared, the two telescopes have helped uncover some of the mysteries of the universe. For more information, visit nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Paul Morris Music Credits: "Friends Hold Fast" by Tarek Modi [PRS]; Killer Tracks Production Music
  • Hubble and Going Forward to the Moon
    2019.07.15
    We are going forward to the Moon by 2024, but did you know that back in 2005, Dr. Jim Garvin and his team of scientists pointed the Hubble Space Telescope at our nearest celestial neighbor for a very important reason? The Hubble team used the telescope’s powerful instruments to work as a prospector for the Moon’s surface, searching for resources that would help future human-led missions mine and utilize those materials to “live off the land” of the Moon. Hubble’s lunar research led the way for future missions, such as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, helping men and women to go forward to the Moon by 2024! For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Paul Morris. Music credits: "Tracer" by Max Cameron Concors [ASCAP]; Killer Tracks Production Music. “Insights” by Axel Coon [GEMA], Ralf Goebel [GEMA] Killer Tracks Production Music. “Transitions” by Ben Niblett [PRS], Jon Cotton [PRS] Killer Tracks Production Music. “Interstellar Spacecraft” by JC Lemay [SACEM] Killer Tracks Production Music.
  • Servicing Mission 4 Overview
    2019.05.11
    On May 11, 2009, the brave crew of Space Shuttle Atlantis lifted off to make NASA's Hubble Space Telescope more powerful than ever before. Hubble's Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) was the most ambitious and complicated to date. Changing out two major science instruments and repairing two others while in space helped to make this mission truly memorable. Thanks to the astronauts of SM4, the Hubble Space Telescope is at the apex of its power and capabilities. To celebrate SM4’s 10 year anniversary, this video gives a quick and in-depth review on the accomplishments of this historic mission. The tools and the knowledge gleaned from SM4 are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Paul Morris. Music credits: "Aerial" by Oliver Worth [PRS]; Killer Tracks Production Music
  • Hubble Servicing Mission 4 Archive Teaser
    2019.05.12
    Hubble's Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) was the most ambitious and complicated to date. Changing out two major science instruments and repairing two others while in space helped to make this mission truly memorable. Thanks to the astronauts of SM4, the Hubble Space Telescope is at the apex of its power and capabilities. To celebrate that important moment in history, NASA has gathered the footage of Servicing Mission 4 for posterity's sake, and archived hours of footage for all to use. For more information, visit nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Tim Childers Music Credits: “The Heart of the Challenge” by Tom Caffey via Killer Tracks
  • Hubble's 29th Anniversary
    2019.04.24
    On April 24, 2019, the Hubble Space Telescope celebrated its 29th year in orbit by premiering a never-before-seen view of the Southern Crab Nebula. Even after all these years, Hubble continues to uncover the mysteries of the universe. These are a few science achievements from Hubble’s latest year in orbit. For more information, visit nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Tim Childers Music Credits: “Fortress Europe” by Dan Bodan from the YouTube audio library.
  • Hubble's 28th Anniversary
    2018.05.01
    On April 24, 2018, the Hubble Space Telescope celebrated its 28th year in orbit. Even after all these years, Hubble continues to expand humanity’s knowledge of the universe. These are a few science achievements from Hubble’s latest year in orbit.
  • Hubble Technology Finds Earthly Applications
    2018.04.25
    The decades-long career of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has resulted in a wealth of new technologies, many of which have found earthly applications. Visit Hubble's new webpage on technology transfer at https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/hubble-technology-transfer Learn more about the specific technologies mentioned in this video: Breast biopsy technology - https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/ccds-provide-clearer-and-less-painful-biopsies Dead Sea Scrolls - https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/ccds-help-decipher-ancient-manuscripts Whale shark tracking - https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/star-mapping-algorithms-track-endangered-animals Package scanning - https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/laser-optics-tools-scan-packages-and-groceries Speed skate polishing - https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/polishing-tool-helps-win-olympic-gold
  • Hubble's Messier Marathon Madness
    2018.03.16
    In mid-March, skywatchers in the northern hemisphere can try to observe all 110 objects from the Messier catalog in one night. To celebrate the Messier Marathon, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is releasing 12 new images to add to its extensive collection of Messier objects observed by Hubble. View Hubble's full Messier catalog at nasa.gov/hubble.
  • Hubble Inspires Our Inner Explorer
    2017.11.08
    Humanity's drive to explore led to one of the most iconic exploration machines of all time, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. This video was edited by summer interns at the Goddard Space Flight Center.
  • Goddard + Hubble, Valentines Since 1984
    2017.02.14
    Hubble's Space Telescope Operations Control Center (STOCC) had its ribbon-cutting ceremony at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on Valentine's Day, 1984, beginning a long-lasting relationship that thrives to this day. Read more about Hubble mission operations at the STOCC here - https://www.nasa.gov/content/hubble-mission-operations
  • Hubble: Humanity's Quest for Knowledge
    2016.12.30
    Launched on April 24, 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope has provided over a million observations, advancing studies of the solar system, nebulae, exoplanets, stars, black holes, galaxies, dark matter, and dark energy. The culmination of decades of human ingenuity, the Hubble Space Telescope remains at peak performance and continues humanity's quest for knowledge. Follow Hubble online at nasa.gov/hubble and @NASA_Hubble
  • Hubble Traveling Exhibit
    2016.08.01
    Hubble's "New Views of the Universe" traveling exhibit immerses visitors in the magnificence and mystery of the Hubble mission and introduces the James Webb Space Telescope. If you are considering hosting the exhibit, you may explore the different sections of the installation in these videos. If you are currently hosting the exhibit, you are welcome to share this short promotional video. A special thank you to the Buffalo State University Planetarium, Buffalo, NY and its students for supporting the production of this video. For more information, visit nasa.gov/content/the-hubble-traveling-exhibit
  • Can you #SpotHubble?
    2016.07.21
    Since its launch in 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope has sent back mind-blowing images that not only changed our understanding of our universe, but also changed where we see glimpses of our universe in everyday life. Hubble is more than a science spacecraft; it’s a cultural phenomenon! Take a moment to think about where you’ve seen the Hubble Space Telescope or Hubble images in your daily life. Maybe you own a textbook with a picture of the telescope on the cover, or you walk by a mural inspired by Hubble images every day on your way to work. Perhaps you’ve even created art based on Hubble images. We want to see the Hubble impact in your life! Share your photos with us on Instagram, Twitter, Flickr and Facebook. How to #SpotHubble! There are four social media platforms that you can use to submit your work. Flickr: Submit your photos to the Spot Hubble Flickr Group Instagram: Use the Instagram app to upload your photo, and in the description include #SpotHubble and #NASAGoddard Twitter: Share your image on Twitter and include #SpotHubble in the tweet Facebook: Share your image on Facebook and include #SpotHubble in the post If a #SpotHubble image catches our eye, we may share your post on our NASA Hubble social media accounts. Terms and Conditions For more information: NASA Invites You to #SpotHubble
  • Hubble Memorable Moments
    2016.04.14
    In celebration of the 25 years since the Hubble Space Telescope's April 1990 launch, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center recalls intense moments throughout Hubble's history that were memorable for Goddard's engineers and flight operators.
  • 20 Years of Hubble Science
    2010.07.22
    This video series focuses on two areas of science that the Hubble Space Telescope has helped advance: thee formation and evolution of galaxies and detection of extrasolar planets.
  • Making Hubble More Powerful
    2009.05.12
    The Hubble Space Telescope would not be able to produce its breathtaking science without the upgraded infrastructure targeted during the HST SM4 mission: Fine Guidance Sensor, Scientific Instrument Command and Data Handling, Soft Capture Mechanism, Batteries, and New Outer Blanket Layers. Along with all new cameras, scientific instruments, the Hubble telescope will work better than it ever has in its lifetime.
  • Hubble Career Profiles
    2009.07.27
    These profiles begin to explore what systems engineering is as seen through the roles of Benjamin Reed and Jackie Townsend on the Hubble Space Telescope. Reed is a materials assurance engineer who has a background in chemistry and has most recently worked on improving Hubble's outer blanket layer. Townsend came to Goddard with a background in physics and has served as the instrument manager of Hubble's newest imager, Wide Field Camera 3. Through their personal backgrounds and current work, Reed and Townsend show that great engineers share patience, tenacity, and a passion for problem solving.
  • The Hubble Legacy: A Collegiate Case Study
    2009.07.27
    USA Today Education, in collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, brings the final section of a six-part case study, which explores the human ingenuity, vision, and expertise represented in the still-evoloving story of the Hubble Space Telescope. The interviews that follow are based on the Critical Inquiry section of the case study, which was composed by the subject matter experts at NASA.

Career Aspirations

These videos feature the many career paths that the Hubble Space Telescope has available. From the astronauts who fix Hubble to the developers who work on its software, from the scientists who study the data to the people who spread the word about its discoveries, the telescope is supported by people who traveled unique paths to join the Hubble adventure. Learn about their stories and find out how your skills could lead you to NASA.
  • Hubble Career Page 360 Degree Video
    2019.07.08
    Hubble careers are as wide-ranging and different as the people who hold the jobs. From the astronauts who fix the telescope to the engineers who work on its software, from the scientists who study the data to the people who spread the word about its discoveries, Hubble is supported by people who organize, budget, educate and more. Meet some of the people behind the telescope and learn about the unique paths they traveled to join the Hubble adventure. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Georgina Chiou: Lead Producer Music credits: "The Power of Pride" by Matthew St Laurent [ASCAP]; Killer Tracks Production Music Videos must be uploaded to and played on a platform that supports 360-degree video in order to view in 360.
  • Dr. John Grunsfeld: NASA Astronaut and Astronomer
    2020.09.14
    As an astronaut who operated on Hubble multiple times in orbit, Dr. John Grunsfeld has a unique relationship with the telescope. He’s watched Hubble drift against the background of Earth and stars, and he’s guided new parts and instruments into the telescope and left it whole and healthy. His quest to become an astronaut started at 6 years old. As a child, he toted a lunch box decorated with a NASA Gemini theme, celebrating an early human spaceflight program. This video features Dr. Grunsfeld going over his unique bond with the Hubble Space Telescope. Music Credits: “Vaporous Waters” by Elio Antony [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. “Innocent Activities” by Benjamin James Parsons [PRS] via Sound Pocket Music [PRS], and Universal Production Music. “Iron Horse” by Adrien Dennefeld [SACEM] via KTSA Publishing [SACEM], and Universal Production Music.
  • Stephanie Clark: Hubble’s Public Outreach Specialist
    2020.09.17
    Stephanie Clark knew she wanted to work with people. When she graduated from the University of Maryland with a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology, or the science of how the body moves, she was considering a career in pediatric physical therapy. “I have always wanted to work with people and help change their lives for the better.” Little did she know her career path would lead her to the Hubble Space Telescope... Music Credits: “Elapsing Time” by Christiian Teelford [ASCAP], Robert Anthony Navarro [ASCAP], and Universal Production Music.
  • Exploring Our Solar System with Dr. Amy Simon
    2021.02.10
    Dr. Amy Simon has always been fascinated with space. From a young age she dreamed of lifting off in the Space Shuttle, just like her hero Sally Ride. Over the years her interest in space remained, and she eventually found herself working at NASA. Dr. Simon is the Senior Scientist for Planetary Atmospheres Research in the Solar System Exploration Division at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Her scientific research involves the study of the composition, dynamics, and cloud structure in jovian planet atmospheres, primarily from spacecraft observations like the Hubble Space Telescope. Dr. Simon is also involved in multiple robotic flight missions, as well as future mission concept development. She was a co-investigator on the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) and is the Deputy Instrument Scientist for the OSIRIS-REx Visible and near-IR Spectrometer (OVIRS), as well as the Landsat 9 TIRS2 instrument, and the Lucy L'Ralph instrument Deputy PI. She is PI of the Hubble Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program. She recently served as science co-lead of the NASA Ice Giants Mission Concept study. This inspiring woman shows the world that anything is possible, and that you should always work hard to follow your passion in life. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "Falling Freet" by Christian Tschuggnall [AKM] and Michael Edwards [APRA] via Atmosphere Music Ltd. [PRS] and Universal Production Music. “Darwin’s Extraordinary Journey” by Laurent Dury [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM] and Universal Production Music.
  • Precision & Design: Making Blankets for Hubble
    2020.07.09
    NASA’s Thermal Blanket Lab is a vital part of ensuring that the important equipment that we send into space remains protected from getting either too hot or too cold. Paula Cain is one of the talented thermal blanket technicians who uses her skillful hands to correctly cover all sorts of spacefaring instruments. Over a decade ago, when she was new to the job, she had a special project related to the Hubble Space Telescope and its fifth and final servicing mission. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Alien Species” by Théo Boulenger [ SACEM ]. Koka Media [ SACEM ] , Universal Publishing Production Music France [ SACEM ], and Universal Production Music “Cascades” by Air Jared [ ASCAP ], Sebastian Barnaby Robertson [ BMI ]. Killer Tracks [ BMI ] , Open Note [ ASCAP ], and Universal Production Music “Wild Journey” by Gilbert Artman [ SACEM ]. Koka Media [ SACEM ], and Universal Production Music “Claraboo” by Denis Levaillant [ SACEM ], Jean-Marc Foltz [ SACEM ]. Koka Media [ SACEM ], and Universal Production Music “Hidden Movement” by Yoann Le Dantec [ SACEM ]. Koka Media [ SACEM ] , Universal Publishing Production Music France [ SACEM ], and Universal Production Music “Urban Migration” by Fred Dubois [ SACEM ]. Koka Media [ SACEM ] , Universal Publishing Production Music France [ SACEM ], and Universal Production Music
  • Hubble Technology Detected Science Writer's Breast Cancer
    2018.10.29
    Ann Jenkins has been writing about the Hubble Space Telescope and its discoveries for most of her adult life. One of her earliest projects with the team was to write about a technology spinoff that used digital imaging technology developed for Hubble in breast biopsy systems to clearly and precisely image suspicious tissue and guide a needle to retrieve a sample. This saved patients from having to undergo a surgical incision, in turn reducing pain, scarring and recovery time. Years later, Jenkins benefitted from the very same technology when a mammogram revealed something suspicious and she had to have a biopsy herself.
  • NASA’s First Chief Astronomer, the Mother of Hubble
    2018.02.11
    In a time when women were discouraged from studying math and science, Nancy Grace Roman became a research astronomer and the first Chief of Astronomy at NASA. Known today as the “Mother of Hubble,” she was instrumental in taking the Hubble Space Telescope from an idea to reality and establishing NASA’s program of space-based astronomical observatories. Celebrate International Day of Women and Girls in Science by listening to more of her story.
  • Mission Possible: Women of the Hubble Space Telescope
    2018.03.08
    When they were growing up, six women couldn’t have imagined that their lives would take them on a journey to NASA to work with the Hubble Space Telescope. From astronaut to social media lead, from scientists to engineers, these featured "Women of Hubble" overcame obstacles and persevered to achieve success and help make Hubble one of the greatest exploration machines in human history. Their inspirational stories teach us that anyone can succeed if you stay curious, never give up, and don’t let anything keep you from reaching your goals.
  • How the Visually Impaired Experience Hubble Images
    2019.10.10
    The Hubble Space Telescope is well known for its incredible images. But what of those among us who are visually impaired? To help spread awareness as a part of World Sight Day, this video is meant to share the importance of different ways to share Hubble's astounding images. The book, "Touch the Universe" by Noreen Grice features some of Hubble's most well-known photographs; but all of these photos were specially made to include everyone. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Rebecca Roth: Lead Producer Courtney Lee: Lead Producer Paul R. Morris (USRA): Producer / Editor Rob Andreoli: Videographer John Caldwell: Videographer Bradley Hague: Videographer Music Credits: "Hercules' by Christian Ort [GEMA], Matthew Tasa [GEMA], Meyer Anthony [GEMA], Siulapwa Cisha [BMI]; Universal Production Music

Iconic Imagery

Some of Hubble's most famous and visually stunning images. For a full catalog of Hubble imagery, search http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/
  • Hubble's Cosmic Reef Image Flyby
    2020.04.29
    This science visualization presents the dramatic landscape of two nebulas in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The video takes viewers on a close-up tour of the nebulas' three-dimensional structures, as deduced by scientists and artists. The visualization is an interpretation of the nebulas' complex structure and is based on images by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. For more information about the Hubble Space Telescope and its images, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Visualization Credits: Greg Bacon, Joseph DePasquale, Leah Hustak, Joseph Olmsted, Alyssa Pagan, Dani Player, and Frank Summers [ STScI ] Music credits: "Cosmic Reef" by J. DePasquale [ STScI ]
  • Jupiter in 4k
    2015.10.13
    These new maps and spinning globes of Jupiter were made from observations performed with NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. They are the first products to come from a program to study the solar system’s outer planets – Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune and, later, Saturn – each year using Hubble. The observations are designed to capture a broad range of features, including winds, clouds, storms and atmospheric chemistry. These annual studies will help current and future scientists see how these giant worlds change over time.

    Scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the University of California at Berkeley produced two global maps of Jupiter from the observations, which were made using Hubble’s high-performance Wide Field Camera 3.

    The two maps represent nearly back-to-back rotations of the planet, making it possible to determine the speeds of Jupiter’s winds. Already, the images have revealed a rare wave just north of the planet’s equator and a unique filament-like feature in the core of the Great Red Spot that had not been seen previously.

    In addition, the new images confirm that the Great Red Spot continues to shrink and become more circular, as it has been doing for years. The long axis of this characteristic storm is about 150 miles (240 kilometers) shorter now than it was in 2014. Recently, the storm had been shrinking at a faster-than-usual rate, but the latest change is consistent with the long-term trend.
  • Across the Universe: The Hubble Ultra Deep Field
    2015.09.25
    The Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) peers deeper into the universe than any previous visible-light image. Multiple observations of the same small patch of sky were combined for an equivalent exposure time of more than 11 days. Revealed within the image are thousands of galaxies located many billions of light-years away. Many of these galaxies are too small and too faint to be otherwise seen. Most importantly, because the light from distant galaxies requires billions of years to cross the intervening space, astronomers get to see them as they were billions of years ago. Much of the history of galaxy development can be found within the HUDF image.
    This scientific visualization flies through a 3D model of the HUDF galaxies. Each of the more than 5,000 galaxies in the model was cut out of the HUDF image and placed at its appropriate distance (as calculated from redshift measurements). The virtual camera flies through this long, thin galaxy dataset, showing how galaxy sizes, shapes, and colors change as one looks both out in space and back in time. Note that, in order to traverse the cosmos in a reasonable amount of time, the distance scale in the model was compressed by a factor of a few hundred.
  • eXtreme Deep Field
    2015.09.25
    In 2004, the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) provided a ground-breaking view of distant galaxies. In 2009, those data were augmented with new infrared observations to create the HUDF-IR. In 2012, the Hubble eXtreme Deep Field (HXDF) combined those images along with a complete census of archival datasets to see yet farther into the universe. The HXDF contains roughly 5,500 galaxies stretching over 13 billion light-years of space, and represents astronomy's deepest view into the cosmos.
    This scientific visualization depicts a flight through the HXDF galaxies. Using measured and estimated distances for approximately 3,000 galaxies, astronomers and visualizers constructed a three-dimensional model of the galaxy distribution. The camera traverses through the thirteen-billion-light-year dataset and ends in blackness, not because more distant galaxies do not exist, but because such galaxies have not yet been observed. For cinematic reasons, the exceedingly vast distances in the 3D model have been significantly compressed.
  • Horsehead Nebula
    2015.09.25
    The Horsehead Nebula is a dark cloud of dense gas and dust located just below the belt of Orion on the sky. A visible light view shows a strong silhouette resembling the horse's head used for a knight in chess. Infrared light, however, reveals a more complex scene, as shown in Hubble's 2013 image. The warm parts of the clouds glow in infrared light, plus longer infrared wavelengths can penetrate deeper into the clouds. A dark and relatively featureless scene is revealed as a glowing gaseous landscape.
    This video presents a scientific visualization of the Horsehead Nebula as seen in infrared light. To fill out the widescreen frame, the central Hubble image has been augmented by ground-based observations from the European Southern Observatory's Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). The three-dimensional interpretation has been sculpted to create a wispy and mountainous environment, with stars distributed in an approximate and statistical manner. The computer graphics model is intended to be scientifically reasonable, but not fully accurate. This imaginative traverse provides an inspiring spaceflight experience that brings the celestial scene to life.
  • Carina Nebula
    2015.09.25
    The Carina Nebula is a vast, star-forming region in our Milky Way Galaxy. Within the nebula, new stars form out of dense, dark clouds of gas and dust. The bright, high-energy radiation from massive young stars erodes away the dark gas. Tall pillars, such as the ones featured in this sequence, form when dense pockets of gas resist that erosion. The illuminating stars for these pillars are located well off the top of the image. At the peaks of two pillars, jets of emission serve as the birth announcements of new stars buried within the clouds. The image is nicknamed "Mystic Mountain" and was released in celebration of the 20th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope.
    Like most astronomical objects, the Carina Nebula is too far away for the Hubble Space Telescope to see in a three-dimensional perspective. This scientific visualization separates the stars and layers of the nebula to create depth from the 2D image. A virtual camera flies into the resulting 3D model, which is informed by astronomical knowledge but is not scientifically accurate. Distances, in particular, have been greatly compressed.
  • Orion Nebula
    2013.10.17
    This dramatic image offers a peek inside a cavern of roiling dust and gas where thousands of stars are forming. The image, taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, represents the sharpest view ever taken of this region, called the Orion Nebula. More than 3,000 stars of various sizes appear in this image. Some of them have never been seen in visible light. These stars reside in a dramatic dust-and-gas landscape of plateaus, mountains, and valleys that are reminiscent of the Grand Canyon.
  • Westerlund 2
    2015.09.24
    This visualization provides a three-dimensional perspective on Hubble's 25th anniversary image of the nebula Gum 29 with the star cluster Westerlund 2 at its core. The flight traverses the foreground stars and approaches the lower left rim of the nebula Gum 29. Passing through the wispy darker clouds on the near side, the journey reveals bright gas illuminated by the intense radiation of the newly formed stars of cluster Westerlund 2. Within the nebula, several pillars of dark, dense gas are being shaped by the energetic light and strong stellar winds from the brilliant cluster of thousands of stars.
  • Veil Nebula
    2015.09.24
    This 3-D visualization flies across a small portion of the Veil Nebula as photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope. This region is a small part of a huge expanding remnant from a star that exploded many thousands of years ago. Hubble resolves tangled rope-like filaments of glowing gases.
    The 3-D model has been created for illustrative purposes and shows that that the giant bubble of gas has a thin, rippled surface. It also highlights that the emission from different chemical elements arises from different layers of gas within the nebula. In the imagery, emission from hydrogen, sulfur, and oxygen are shown in red, green, and blue, respectively.
  • Eagle Nebula
    2014.05.01
    Where stars are born.
  • Hubble Images
    2014.01.24
    Some large-resolution images from hubblesite.org, prepared for the hyperwall.
  • Andromeda Galaxy
    2013.10.17
    Andromeda galaxy–also called M31 by astronomers–is the largest galaxy in the Local Group, the group of galaxies that our Milky Way galaxy also belongs to. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Multi-cycle program to map roughly a third of M31’s star forming disk, using 6 filters covering from the ultraviolet through the near infrared. With HST’s resolution and sensitivity, the disk of M31 will be resolved into more than 100 million stars, enabling a wide range of scientific endeavors. This movie starts with a 1.5 x 3.0 kiloparsec (KPC) view of part of Andromeda's major star forming ring. The field contains millions of stars, mottled by filaments of dust, which dim and redden the background stars. As the movie begins, it zooms into the region, revealing a rich mix of old red stars and young blue stars, along with occasional background galaxies and emission line nebulosity. As the movie pans across, it moves into regions of intense star formation, traced by thousands of bright blue stars. Satellite: Hubble Space Telescope

Documentaries

These documentaries highlight some of the biggest moments and people involved with the Hubble Space Telescope.
  • New Hubble Video Miniseries Goes Behind the Scenes of Our "Eye in the Sky"
    2020.07.13
    A new video miniseries explores the intricate world of operating the Hubble Space Telescope. In Hubble – Eye in the Sky, viewers get an inside look at the challenges of operating the telescope, along with an understanding of the groundbreaking discoveries that forever changed the way we view space. Leading scientists, engineers and a Nobel prize winner take us through the innovation and strategies that keep the telescope in prime condition. Starting on July 15, the first episode, “Driving the Telescope,” visits Hubble’s control center to find out how a telescope in space is managed and operated from Earth. The following two episodes will premiere on July 20 and 23. They explore the riveting discoveries, technological updates and “time machine” capabilities of Hubble. Watch Hubble – Eye in the Sky starting on July 15, and follow Hubble on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Positioned above Earth’s murky atmosphere, Hubble fundamentally changed the field of astronomy and our understanding of the universe. For more information, visit NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope website. Music Credits: “Only Seconds Left” by Donn Wilkerson [ BMI ]. Killer Tracks [ BMI ] and Universal Production Music.
  • Episode 1: Driving The Telescope (Hubble – Eye in the Sky miniseries)
    2020.07.15
    Episode 1: Driving the Telescope – Visit Hubble’s control center to learn about the challenges and techniques of performing extraordinarily detailed observations with an orbiting space telescope. Tour the rarely seen, life-size simulator at NASA that helps engineers and operators investigate problems and test new solutions before implementing them on the real telescope in space. This series, Hubble – Eye in the Sky, takes you behind the scenes into the world of Hubble Space Telescope operations. Discover the strategies needed to run a bus-sized observatory as it speeds around Earth at 17,000 miles per hour, and find out how Hubble collects the incredible images and groundbreaking data that have transformed humanity’s vision of space. Witness the ingenuity that keeps such a complex and remote machine working to investigate the mysteries of the universe for more than 30 years. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Production & Post: Origin Videos & Images: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center European Space Agency Space Telescope Science Institute Music: The Machines — Richard Canavan Interesting Conundrum — K1Woods Watching The Stars — Rimsky Music Better Times Coming — Zeonium (PremiumBeat by Shutterstock)
  • Episode 2: An Unexpected Journey (Hubble – Eye in the Sky miniseries)
    2020.07.20
    Episode 2: An Unexpected Journey – With five servicing missions, upgraded instruments, and new ways of operating, Hubble is not the same telescope it was when it launched. Discover the innovative ways astronomers and engineers use Hubble today. This series, Hubble – Eye in the Sky, takes you behind the scenes into the world of Hubble Space Telescope operations. Discover the strategies needed to run a bus-sized observatory as it speeds around Earth at 17,000 miles per hour, and find out how Hubble collects the incredible images and groundbreaking data that have transformed humanity’s vision of space. Witness the ingenuity that keeps such a complex and remote machine working to investigate the mysteries of the universe for more than 30 years. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Production & Post: Origin Videos & Images: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center European Space Agency Space Telescope Science Institute Music: The Machines — Richard Canavan Cosmic Call — Immersive Music Moving Headlines — Immersive Music Our Planet — Remember The Future (PremiumBeat by Shutterstock)
  • Episode 3: Time Machines (Hubble – Eye in the Sky miniseries)
    2020.07.23
    Episode 3: Time Machines – Hubble has looked back billions of years in time to see some of the earliest galaxies in their infancy, and it has fundamentally changed what we know about the universe itself. Find out from Nobel Laureate John Mather and Hubble Senior Project Scientist Jennifer Wiseman how Hubble will work with the future James Webb Space Telescope to revolutionize our understanding of the universe even further. This series, Hubble – Eye in the Sky, takes you behind the scenes into the world of Hubble Space Telescope operations. Discover the strategies needed to run a bus-sized observatory as it speeds around Earth at 17,000 miles per hour, and find out how Hubble collects the incredible images and groundbreaking data that have transformed humanity’s vision of space. Witness the ingenuity that keeps such a complex and remote machine working to investigate the mysteries of the universe for more than 30 years. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Production & Post: Origin Videos & Images: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center European Space Agency Space Telescope Science Institute Music: The Machines — Richard Canavan Counting The Stars — Patrick Rundblad Wonderful Places — Mocha Music Fallen Dynasty — Evan MacDonald (PremiumBeat by Shutterstock)

Trivia

Hubble Trivia is a miniseries featuring some frequently asked questions and surprising facts about the famous space telescope.
  • Hubble Trivia
    2020.08.12
    The Hubble Space Telescope has been answering questions about the universe for over 30 years. Now it’s your turn to answer some questions about Hubble! Hubble Trivia is a miniseries featuring some frequently asked questions and surprising facts about the famous space telescope. See if you can answer each trivia question before the answer is revealed!

Hubble Tool Time

A six-part mini-series about the tools used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions.
  • Hubble Tool Time Promo
    2019.04.15
    Tuesdays starting on April 16, 2019, we will be releasing a new six-part mini-series about the tools used on Hubble's servicing missions, hosted by retired NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld. Hubble was uniquely designed to be serviced in space so that components could be repaired and upgraded. Astronauts performed challenging spacewalks on five servicing missions from 1993 to 2009 to keep Hubble operating so that it could change our fundamental understanding of the universe. In addition to enabling Hubble's scientific discoveries, the tools developed by teams at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested with the Johnson Space Center furthered NASA's human exploration capabilities. These tools and the knowledge gleaned from the Hubble servicing missions are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the moon and Mars. For more information, visit nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Paul Morris. Music credits: "Wine On It" by Kevin Blanc [SACEM]; KTSA Publishing SACEM; Gum Tapes; Killer Tracks Production Music.
  • Hubble Tool Time Episode 1 - Astronaut Training
    2019.04.16
    Retired NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld hosts this six-part mini-series about the tools used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. Hubble was uniquely designed to be serviced in space so that components could be repaired and upgraded. Astronauts risked their lives on five servicing missions from 1993 to 2009 to enable Hubble to conduct world-class science. In addition to enabling Hubble's scientific discoveries, the tools developed and tested by teams at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center furthered NASA's human exploration capabilities. These tools and the knowledge gleaned from the Hubble servicing missions are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the moon and Mars. Join John and astronaut trainer Christy Hansen in this first episode to learn about how astronauts trained to use the tools on the Hubble servicing missions. For more information, visit nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Katrina Jackson. Music credits: "Wine On It" by Kevin Blanc [SACEM]; KTSA Publishing SACEM; Gum Tapes; Killer Tracks Production Music. "Breakthrough" by Donn Wilerson [BMI]; Killer Tracks BMI; Killer Tracks Production Music.
  • Hubble Tool Time Episode 2 - Servicing Mission 1
    2019.04.23
    Retired NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld hosts this six-part mini-series about the tools used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. Hubble was uniquely designed to be serviced in space so that components could be repaired and upgraded. Astronauts using custom-designed tools performed challenging spacewalks on five servicing missions from 1993 to 2009 to keep Hubble operating so that it could change our fundamental understanding of the universe. Join John and EVA manager Russ Werneth in this episode of Hubble Tool Time to learn about the power ratchet tool used on Hubble’s first servicing mission in 1993. In addition to enabling Hubble's scientific discoveries, the tools developed by teams at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested in collaboration with the Johnson Space Center furthered NASA's human exploration capabilities. These tools and the knowledge gleaned from the Hubble servicing missions are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars. For more information, visit nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Katrina Jackson. Music credits: "Wine On It" by Kevin Blanc [SACEM]; KTSA Publishing SACEM; Gum Tapes; Killer Tracks Production Music. "Breakthrough" by Donn Wilerson [BMI]; Killer Tracks BMI; Killer Tracks Production Music.
  • Hubble Tool Time Episode 3 - Servicing Mission 2
    2019.04.30
    Retired NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld hosts this six-part mini-series about the tools used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. Hubble was uniquely designed to be serviced in space so that components could be repaired and upgraded. Astronauts using custom-designed tools performed challenging spacewalks on five servicing missions from 1993 to 2009 to keep Hubble operating so that it could change our fundamental understanding of the universe. Join John and EVA manager Russ Werneth in this episode of Hubble Tool Time to learn about the pistol grip tool developed for Hubble’s second servicing mission in 1997, a tool that astronauts now use on almost every spacewalk. In addition to enabling Hubble's scientific discoveries, the tools developed by teams at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested in collaboration with the Johnson Space Center furthered NASA's human exploration capabilities. These tools and the knowledge gleaned from the Hubble servicing missions are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Katrina Jackson. Music credits: "Wine On It" by Kevin Blanc [SACEM]; KTSA Publishing SACEM; Gum Tapes; Killer Tracks Production Music. "Breakthrough" by Donn Wilerson [BMI]; Killer Tracks BMI; Killer Tracks Production Music.
  • Hubble Tool Time Episode 4 - Servicing Mission 3A
    2019.05.07
    Retired NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld hosts this six-part mini-series about the tools used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. Hubble was uniquely designed to be serviced in space so that components could be repaired and upgraded. Astronauts using custom-designed tools performed challenging spacewalks on five servicing missions from 1993 to 2009 to keep Hubble operating so that it could change our fundamental understanding of the universe. Join John and EVA engineer Ed Rezac in this episode of Hubble Tool Time to learn about the difficult job of replacing Hubble’s Rate Sensor Units on Servicing Mission 3A in 1999 and the resulting tool created to make the job easier. In addition to enabling Hubble's scientific discoveries, the tools developed by teams at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested in collaboration with the Johnson Space Center furthered NASA's human exploration capabilities. These tools and the knowledge gleaned from the Hubble servicing missions are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Katrina Jackson. Music credits: "Wine On It" by Kevin Blanc [SACEM]; KTSA Publishing SACEM; Gum Tapes; Killer Tracks Production Music. "Breakthrough" by Donn Wilerson [BMI]; Killer Tracks BMI; Killer Tracks Production Music.
  • Hubble Tool Time Episode 5 - Servicing Mission 3B
    2019.05.14
    Retired NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld hosts this six-part mini-series about the tools used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. Hubble was uniquely designed to be serviced in space so that components could be repaired and upgraded. Astronauts using custom-designed tools performed challenging spacewalks on five servicing missions from 1993 to 2009 to keep Hubble operating so that it could change our fundamental understanding of the universe. Join John and EVA engineer Ed Rezac in this episode of Hubble Tool Time to learn about developing a wrench-like connector tool to replace Hubble’s Power Control Unit on Servicing Mission 3B in 2002. In addition to enabling Hubble's scientific discoveries, the tools developed by teams at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested in collaboration with the Johnson Space Center furthered NASA's human exploration capabilities. These tools and the knowledge gleaned from the Hubble servicing missions are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Katrina Jackson. Music credits: "Wine On It" by Kevin Blanc [SACEM]; KTSA Publishing SACEM; Gum Tapes; Killer Tracks Production Music. "Breakthrough" by Donn Wilerson [BMI]; Killer Tracks BMI; Killer Tracks Production Music.
  • Hubble Tool Time Episode 6 - Servicing Mission 4
    2019.05.21
    Retired NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld hosts this six-part mini-series about the tools used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. Hubble was uniquely designed to be serviced in space so that components could be repaired and upgraded. Astronauts using custom-designed tools performed challenging spacewalks on five servicing missions from 1993 to 2009 to keep Hubble operating so that it could change our fundamental understanding of the universe. Join John, EVA engineer Ed Rezac, and astronaut trainer Christy Hansen in this episode of Hubble Tool Time to learn about creating a Fastener Capture Plate to capture 111 screws in order to repair the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on Servicing Mission 4 in 2009. In addition to enabling Hubble's scientific discoveries, the tools developed by teams at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested in collaboration with the Johnson Space Center furthered NASA's human exploration capabilities. These tools and the knowledge gleaned from the Hubble servicing missions are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Katrina Jackson. Music credits: "Wine On It" by Kevin Blanc [SACEM]; KTSA Publishing SACEM; Gum Tapes; Killer Tracks Production Music. "Breakthrough" by Donn Wilerson [BMI]; Killer Tracks BMI; Killer Tracks Production Music.

Servicing Missions

This five-part miniseries showcases Hubble's incredible servicing missions. Hubble, orbiting 353 miles (569 km) above the surface of Earth, is the first telescope designed for space-based maintenance. Astronauts visiting Hubble have made repairs, replaced parts, and updated its technology with new instruments.
  • Hubble’s Servicing Mission 1
    2020.12.02
    Shortly after the Hubble Space Telescope was deployed in 1990, the observatory's primary mirror was discovered to have an aberration that affected the clarity of the telescope's early images. Fortunately, Hubble, orbiting 353 miles (569 km) above the surface of the Earth, was the first telescope designed to be visited in space by astronauts to perform repairs, replace parts, and update its technology with new instruments. Servicing Mission 1, launched in December 1993, was the first opportunity to conduct planned maintenance on the telescope. In addition, new instruments were installed and the optics of the flaw in Hubble's primary mirror was corrected. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "Sleep Patterns" by Oliver Worth [PRS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd [PRS] and Universal Production Music. "Tides" by Ben Niblett [PRS], and Jon Cotton [PRS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd [PRS] and Universal Production Music. "Mirrored Cubes" by Laurent Dury [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM] and Universal Production Music. "Natural Time Cycles by Laurent Dury [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM] and Universal Production Music. Motion Graphics Template Media Credits: Lower Thirds Auto Self Resizing by cayman via Motion Array
  • Hubble’s Servicing Mission 2
    2021.02.16
    The Second Servicing Mission, launched February 11, 1997, greatly improved Hubble's productivity. The installation of new instruments extended Hubble's wavelength range into the near infrared for imaging and spectroscopy, allowing us to probe the most distant reaches of the universe. The replacement of failed or degraded spacecraft components increased efficiency and performance. A seven-member STS-82 crew took part in this mission. Four astronauts conducted the planned spacewalks: Mark Lee, Gregory Harbaugh, Steven Smith and Joseph Tanner were part of the extravehicular activity crew. Kenneth Bowersox was the commander, Scott Horowitz was the pilot, and Steven Hawley was the Remote Manipulator System Operator. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "Cristal Delight" by Fred Dubois [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM] and Universal Production Music. “Paradigm” by Laurent Dury [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM] and Universal Production Music. “Temporal Kinetics” by Laurent Dury [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM] and Universal Production Music. “Drive to Succeed” by Stephen Daniel Lemaire [ASCAP] via El Murmullo Sarao [SGAE], Universal Sarao [SGAE] and Universal Production Music. Motion Graphics Template Media Credits: Lower Thirds Auto Self Resizing by cayman via Motion Array
  • Hubble’s Servicing Mission 3A
    2020.12.18
    What was originally conceived as a mission of preventive maintenance turned more urgent on November 13, 1999, when the fourth of six gyros failed and Hubble temporarily closed its eyes on the universe. Unable to conduct science without three working gyros, Hubble entered a state of dormancy called safe mode. Essentially, Hubble "went to sleep" while it waited for help. NASA decided to split the Third Servicing Mission (SM3) into two parts, SM3A and SM3B, after the third of Hubble's six gyroscopes failed. In accordance with NASA's flight rules, a "call-up" mission was quickly approved and developed and executed in a record 7 months! The crew of STS-103 including astronauts Curtis L. Brown Jr., Scott J. Kelly, John M. Grunsfeld, Jean-François Clervoy, Michael Foale, Steven L. Smith, and Claude Nicollier ensured that the Hubble Space Telescope continued its mission into the 21st century. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "Illuminations" by Aleksander Terris [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM] and Universal Production Music. “Castle Road” by Laurent Dury [SACEM ]via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM] and Universal Production Music. “Urgent Pizzicati” by Fabrice Ravel Chapuis [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM] and Universal Production Music. “Royal Legacy” by Laurent Dury [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM] and Universal Production Music. “A Fresh Perspective” by Stephen Daniel Lemaire [ASCAP] via El Murmullo Sarao [SGAE], Universal Sarao [SGAE] and Universal Production Music. Motion Graphics Template Media Credits: Lower Thirds Auto Self Resizing by cayman via Motion Array Old TV Graphic by SVZUL via Motion Array
  • Hubble’s Servicing Mission 3B
    2021.03.01
    Servicing Mission 3B was actually the fourth visit to Hubble. NASA split the original Servicing Mission 3 into two parts and conducted 3A in December of 1999. During SM3B a new science instrument will be installed: the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Several other activities were accomplished as well over a 12-day mission with 5 spacewalks. Four astronauts trained for five scheduled spacewalks to upgrade and service the Hubble Space Telescope during the STS-109 mission in early 2002. Three veteran astronauts, John M.Grunsfeld, James H. Newman, and Richard M. Linnehan, were joined by Michael J. Massimino, who will be making his first space flight. Scott Altman, (Cmdr., USN), a two-time shuttle veteran, commanded the STS-109 mission. He was joined on the flight deck by pilot Duane Carey, (Lt. Col., USAF), making his first space flight, and flight engineer Nancy Currie (Lt. Col, USA, Ph.D.). Currie had three previous space flights to her credit. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "Piano Bar" by Steve Marvin [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. “On a Tightrope” by Jay Price [PRS] and Paul Reeves [PRS] via KAtmosphere Music Ltd. [PRS] and Universal Production Music. "Cocktail For 3" by Steve Marvin [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. "On Going Process" by Laurent Dury [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. "Intrigues and Plots" by Laurent Dury [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. "Hyperion" by Laurent Dury [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. Motion Graphics Template Media Credits: Lower Thirds Auto Self Resizing by cayman via Motion Array
  • Hubble’s Servicing Mission 4
    2021.05.11
    The Hubble Space Telescope was reborn with Servicing Mission 4 (SM4), the fifth and final servicing of the orbiting observatory. During SM4, two new scientific instruments were installed – the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Two failed instruments, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), were brought back to life by the first ever on-orbit repairs. With these efforts, Hubble has been brought to the apex of its scientific capabilities. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "Aquarius" by Fred Dubois [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. “Adam and Eve” by Laurent Dury [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. "Inquiring Mind" by Leon Mitchener [NS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd. [PRS], and Universal Production Music. "Weight of Water" by Anthony Edwin Phillips [PRS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd. [PRS], and Universal Production Music. "Urban Migration" by Fred Dubois [SACEM] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music. "Get up and Run" by Raul del Moral Redondo [SGAE] via El Murmullo Sarao [SGAE], Universal Sarao [SGAE], and Universal Production Music. “Metamorphosis” by Matthew St Laurent [ASCAP] via Soundcast Music [SESAC] and Universal Production Music. Motion Graphics Template Media Credits: Lower Thirds Auto Self Resizing by cayman via Motion Array

Anniversary Celebrations

Hubble’s unique design, allowing it to be repaired and upgraded with advanced technology by astronauts, has made it one of NASA’s longest-living and most valuable observatories, beaming transformational astronomical images and discoveries to Earth for decades. These videos commemorate Hubble’s 30th birthday which was celebrated in 2020, and Hubble's 25th birthday which was celebrated in 2015.
  • Hubble's 30th Anniversary Celebration
    2020.12.23
    In 2020, the Hubble Space Telescope achieved its 30th year in orbit. Hubble’s unique design, allowing it to be repaired and upgraded with advanced technology by astronauts, has made it one of NASA’s longest-living and most valuable space-based observatories, beaming transformational astronomical images to Earth for decades. Hubble has fundamentally changed our understanding of the cosmos, and its story — filled with challenges overcome by innovation, determination, and the human spirit — inspires us. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: "One Destiny" by Mark Petrie [ASCAP] via Soundcast Music [SESAC] and Universal Production Music “Never Give Up” by Michael James Burns [PRS] via Atmosphere Music Ltd [PRS] and Universal Production Music
  • Hubble’s Universe: Solar System Surprises
    2020.06.30
    Celebrating 30 years in orbit, The Hubble Space Telescope has revealed astonishing secrets about our universe. Yet, while its most famous pictures may reveal galaxies and nebulas across the cosmos, it’s also unlocked secrets here in our own solar system. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Minimal Fiber (Loop)” Paul Lipson [BMI]. Universal Production Music
  • Hubble’s Universe: Milky Way Marvels
    2020.07.01
    30 years ago, the Hubble Space Telescope unlocked a window on the universe. Through that window we’ve seen the wonders of our Milky Way and expanded our vision across the galaxy. From the birth and death of stars to the baby pictures of planets, these are some of Hubble’s Milky Way marvels. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Limitless” by Andre Tavarez [BMI], Sebastian Barnaby Robertson [BMI] Universal Production Music
  • Hubble’s Universe: Intergalactic Elegance
    2020.07.02
    Hubble has seen galaxies at the edge of the visible universe. It has unlocked a cosmos so vast and filled with wonder that it boggles the mind. The Hubble Telescope has learned how galaxies merge, and found the powerful jets from massive black-holes. It has uncovered the “dark energy” behind universal expansion and mapped the dark matter that connects galaxies. Through it all, it has revealed an intergalactic elegance that stretches across the universe. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Silver Lining” by Bernhard Hering [GEMA] and Matthias Kruger [GEMA]. Ed Berlin Production Music and Universal Production Music
  • Hubble’s 30th Year in Orbit
    2020.04.27
    On April 24, 2020, the Hubble Space Telescope celebrated its 30th year in orbit by premiering a never-before-seen view of two stunning nebulas named NGC 2020 and NGC 2014. Even after all these years, Hubble continues to uncover the mysteries of the universe. These are a few science achievements from Hubble’s latest year in orbit. For more information about the Hubble Space Telescope and its images, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Twist of Fate” by Axel Tenner [GEMA], Michael Schluecker [GEMA], and Raphael Schalz [GEMA]. Berlin Production Music and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble’s 30th Anniversary Image
    2020.04.24
    On April 24, 2020, the Hubble Space Telescope celebrated its 30th year in orbit by premiering a never-before-seen view of two beautiful nebulas named NGC 2020 and NGC 2014. Hubble’s Senior Project Scientist Dr. Jennifer Wiseman takes us on a tour of this stunning new image, describes the telescope's current health, and summarizes some of Hubble's contributions to astronomy during its 30-year career. For more information about the Hubble Space Telescope and its images, visit nasa.gov/hubble. Music Credits: “Perpetual Twilight” by Christophe La Pinta [SACEM], Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Publishing Production Music France [SACEM], and Universal Production Music.
  • Hubble Space Telescope's 30th Anniversary Beauty Passes
    2020.04.17
    Two new animations commisioned for Hubble Space Telescope's 30th Anniversary showing the observatory in orbit around the Earth.
  • Hubble's Cosmic Reef Image Flyby
    2020.04.29
    This science visualization presents the dramatic landscape of two nebulas in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The video takes viewers on a close-up tour of the nebulas' three-dimensional structures, as deduced by scientists and artists. The visualization is an interpretation of the nebulas' complex structure and is based on images by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. For more information about the Hubble Space Telescope and its images, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Visualization Credits: Greg Bacon, Joseph DePasquale, Leah Hustak, Joseph Olmsted, Alyssa Pagan, Dani Player, and Frank Summers [ STScI ] Music credits: "Cosmic Reef" by J. DePasquale [ STScI ]
  • Hubble 30th Anniversary Logo
    2020.02.26
    In 2020, the Hubble Space Telescope achieves its 30th year in orbit. This page includes's NASA's 30th anniversary logos for the Hubble Space Telescope
  • Hubble Memorable Moments
    2016.04.14
    In celebration of the 25 years since the Hubble Space Telescope's April 1990 launch, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center recalls intense moments throughout Hubble's history that were memorable for Goddard's engineers and flight operators.
  • Edited B-Roll From Hubble 25th Anniversary NASA Social
    2015.04.23
    Edited NATSOUND package from the NASA Social held April 23rd for Hubble's 25th anniversary. NASA Social attendees visited the Hubble Control Room at Goddard Space Flight Center. They also heard from engineers during their visit and even got to see the types of tools astronauts used to service Hubble.
  • Hubble 25th Anniversary Live Shot Resource Page
    2015.04.20
    NASA Scientsts talk about the 25th anniversary of the Hubble Space Telescope. Also includes edited b-roll.
  • Hubble's 25th Anniversary Resource B-Roll Collection
    2015.04.20
    Collection includes highlight reels from the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope on April 24, 1990, deployment and various b-roll of the servicing missions.
  • 25 Years of Hubble
    2015.01.15
    Dr. Frank Summers January 2015 AAS presentation

Archival Footage

Historical footage of the telescope.
  • Hubble Archive - Pre-Launch
    2018.10.04
    This is a recorded interview from Voice of America. In this program, Dr. Fred Whipple discusses sending a telescope above the earth's atmosphere to transcend the atmosphere's obscuring of the view of space. He talks about plans for the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO,) which was a precursor to the Hubble Space Telescope.

    National Archive webpage: https://catalog.archives.gov/id/105636

    SVS webpage: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/13059

    National Archives Identifier: 105636

    Local Identifier: 306.10-23

    Creator: U.S. Information Agency

    From: Record Group 306: Records of the U.S. Information Agency, 1900-2003

    This item was broadcast 07/10/1959

    Production Series: New Horizons in Science

  • Hubble Archive - Launch, STS-31
    2018.10.04
    STS-31 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    Launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, April 24-29 1990

    Astronauts: Loren Shriver, Charles Bolden, Bruce McCandless, Steven Hawley, Kathryn Sullivan

    09:50 - Launch

    12:27 - Opening bay doors

    20:40 - Taking telescope out of payload bay

    24:50 - Deploying the solar arrays

    26:08 - Deploying the high gain antennas

    26:56 - Unfurling the first solar array

    30:16 - EVA preparation

    31:24 - Unfurling the second solar array

    32:00 - Second solar array gets stuck

    34:30 - Disable tension monitoring software to unfurl the solar array

    36:25 - Go for Hubble release

    39:07 - Student experiment

    43:50 - Commands sent to open aperture door

    45:45 - Thank you to training crew

    46:40 - Thoughts on historical significance

    50:09 - Closing bay doors

    50:58 - Shuttle re-entry and landing

    54:59 - Astronauts exiting Shuttle

  • Hubble Archive - Post-Deployment
    2018.10.04

    Digitized tape of the press conference from June 27, 1990 where Ed Weiler and others explain the Hubble Space Telescope's spherical aberration problem and its impact to the science instruments. The aberration wouldn't much affect UV or IR observations, but the Wide Field Planetary Camera would be largely affected since it used visible wavelengths.

    TRT: 30:00

    Participants: Douglas Broome, HST Program Manager; Jean Olivier, Deputy Project Manager; Dr. Edward Weiler, HST Program Scientist at NASA HQ; Dr. Lennard A. Fisk, Associate Administrator Space Science and Applications at NASA HQ; Dr. Peter Stockman, Deputy Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute

    Longer notes:

    Describing the initial spherical aberration problem with the Hubble Space Telescope’s primary mirror. Describe how they conclusively determined the nature of the problem. It affects one of their science objectives. Weiler: “We can still do important science.” UV capability and IR capability not impacted. Spatial resolution is about at ground-based resolution. Explains impacts to each of the instruments.

    HRS - will be able to do most of the science, just not in crowded fields, still excellent for planetary features, least impacted instrument

    FOS - UV science not impacted except on crowded fields, quasar absorption lines won’t be impacted because point sources,

    FOC - highest spatial resolution of the cameras, visible wavelengths will be ground-based resolution except maybe better for bright objects,

    HSP - won’t be able to do science with high signal to noise, but can do about half of proposed science esp in UV

    WFPC - probably no real science we can do with this because in visible

    Fine guidance sensors for astrometry - can do 100% of science we proposed, will be able to look at star’s wobble to find exoplanets

    Biggest impact is loss of spatial resolution for WFPC

    Insurance policy - planned for maintenance program, are already building a second wide-field camera with a corrective mirror, think we can take out all the aberration and get back to original specification, 40% of science was going to be done with wide-field camera, developing NICMOS for near-IR capability that includes corrective optics

    For HRS and FOS, have STIS under development which would replace spectrographic capabilities

    Haven’t yet figured out how the problem occured; putting together a review board

    Don’t know if the aberration is in the primary or secondary mirror

    Didn’t test the two mirrors in combination because it would have been tremendously costly and difficult (hundreds of millions of dollars)

    Cuts off at end

    Audio missing from 11:10 - 11:20

  • Hubble Archive - Servicing Mission 1, STS-61
    2018.10.04
    Shortly after the Hubble Space Telescope was deployed in 1990, the observatory's primary mirror was discovered to have an aberration that affected the clarity of the telescope's early images. Fortunately, Hubble, orbiting 353 miles (569 km) above the surface of the Earth, was the first telescope designed to be visited in space by astronauts to perform repairs, replace parts, and update its technology with new instruments. Servicing Mission 1, launched in December 1993, was the first opportunity to conduct planned maintenance on the telescope. In addition, new instruments were installed and the optics of the flaw in Hubble's primary mirror was corrected.
  • Hubble Archive - Servicing Mission 2, STS-82
    2020.02.11
    After a successful first mission to correct Hubble’s vision in 1993, a second Servicing Mission (STS-82) was launched to the space telescope in February 1997. The goal of this 10-day operation was to enhance Hubble’s scientific capabilities for discovery by conducting a number of maintenance tasks and refurbishing the existing systems. The crew took more than 150 other crew aids and tools on this mission. They ranged from a simple bag for carrying some of the smaller tools to sophisticated, battery-operated power tools. A seven-member crew took part in this mission. Four astronauts conducted the planned spacewalks: Mark Lee, Gregory Harbaugh, Steven Smith and Joseph Tanner were part of the extravehicular activity crew. Kenneth Bowersox was the commander, Scott Horowitz was the pilot, and Steven Hawley was the Remote Manipulator System Operator.
  • Hubble Archive - Servicing Mission 3A, STS-103
    2019.12.19
    Hubble's third servicing mission, Servicing Mission 3A, launched on December 19, 1999 on Space Shuttle Discovery as part of the STS-103 mission. What was originally conceived as a mission of preventive maintenance turned more urgent on November 13, 1999, when the fourth of six gyros failed and Hubble temporarily closed its eyes on the universe. Unable to conduct science without three working gyros, Hubble entered a state of dormancy called safe mode. Essentially, Hubble "went to sleep" while it waited for help. NASA decided to split the Third Servicing Mission (SM3) into two parts, SM3A and SM3B, after the third of Hubble's six gyroscopes failed. In accordance with NASA's flight rules, a "call-up" mission was quickly approved and developed and executed in a record 7 months. The Hubble team left the telescope far more fit and capable than ever before. The new, improved, and upgraded equipment included six fresh gyroscopes, six battery voltage/temperature improvement kits, a faster, more powerful, main computer, a next-generation solid state data recorder, a new transmitter, an enhanced fine guidance sensor, and new insulation.
  • Hubble Archive - Servicing Mission 3B, STS-109
    2020.03.01
    Servicing Mission 3B was actually the fourth visit to Hubble. NASA split the original Servicing Mission 3 into two parts and conducted 3A in December of 1999. During SM3B a new science instrument will be installed: the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Several other activities were accomplished as well over a 12-day mission with 5 spacewalks. Four astronauts trained for five scheduled spacewalks to upgrade and service the Hubble Space Telescope during the STS-109 mission in early 2002. Three veteran astronauts, John M.Grunsfeld, James H. Newman, and Richard M. Linnehan, were joined by Michael J. Massimino, who will be making his first space flight. Grunsfeld had flown three times, STS-67 in 1995, STS-81 in 1997, and STS-103 in 1999 when he performed two spacewalks to service the Hubble Space Telescope. Newman, veteran of three space flights, STS-51 in 1993, STS-69 in 1995, and STS-88 in 1998, had conducted four previous spacewalks. Linnehan had flown on STS-78 in 1996 and STS-90 in 1998. Massimino is a member of the 1996 astronaut class. Scott Altman, (Cmdr., USN), a two-time shuttle veteran, commanded the STS-109 mission. He was joined on the flight deck by pilot Duane Carey, (Lt. Col., USAF), making his first space flight, and flight engineer Nancy Currie (Lt. Col, USA, Ph.D.). Currie had three previous space flights to her credit.
  • Hubble Archive - Servicing Mission 4, STS-125
    2019.04.03
    Hubble's fifth and final servicing mission, Servicing Mission 4, launched on May 11, 2009 on Space Shuttle Atlantis as part of the STS-125 mission. During SM4, two new scientific instruments were installed – the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Two failed instruments, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), were brought back to life by the first ever on-orbit repairs. With these efforts, Hubble has been brought to the apex of its scientific capabilities. To prolong Hubble's life, new batteries, new gyroscopes, a new science computer, a refurbished fine guidance sensor and new insulation on three electronics bays were also installed over the 12-day mission with five spacewalks.
  • Senator Mikulski Celebrates Hubble Success
    2009.05.18
    The Hubble Space Telescope has been with us for nearly two decades. In that time, its breathtaking images have captured peoples imaginations and its groundbreaking science has revealed some of the many secrets of our universe.

    After five spacewalks by the STS-125 mission to repair Hubble, commander Scott "Scooter" Altman confirmed a successful release of the Hubble telescope from the Space Shuttle Atlantis.

    Shortly after the deploy, Maryland Sen. Barbara Mikulski visited controllers in Goddard's Space Telescope Operations Control Center. Mikulski, who praised the Hubble team for their hard work and dedication during this mission.

    For more info: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/topstory/2009/hubble_deploy.html

B-Roll

B-roll reels of Hubble facilities or events
  • 360-Degree Virtual Tour of Hubble Mission Operations
    2018.09.28
    Take a 360-degree, virtual tour of the Hubble Space Telescope’s home for mission operations, the Space Telescope Operations Control Center (STOCC) at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Begin in the lobby to learn about the orbiting spacecraft. Visit the Mission Operations Room, where the flight operators command and monitor Hubble. Step into the Operations Support Room, where the flight team investigates spacecraft anomalies and verifies new procedures. Then explore the exhibit hallway to view hardware that once flew in space aboard Hubble as well as tools that astronauts used to repair and upgrade the observatory. Music credit for all videos: "Looking Forward" by Daniel Backes [GEMA] and Peter Moslener [GEMA]; Ed.Berlin Production Music/Universal Production Music GmbH GEMA; Berlin Production Music; Killer Tracks Production Music Videos must be uploaded to and played on a platform that supports 360-degree video in order to view in 360. You can view a playlist of these videos on YouTube in 360 here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_8hVmWnP_O0GvDYsfyr-4A3MWLfaHWnj
  • Nancy Grace Roman, The Mother of Hubble - Media Resources
    2017.06.12
    Interviews and b-roll of Dr. Nancy Grace Roman, "the Mother of Hubble." Dr. Roman, born May 16, 1925, began working at NASA in 1959 and served as NASA's first Chief of Astronomy.
  • Hubble Facilities
    2016.12.02
    NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the Hubble Space Telescope Operations Project, the government’s team of technical managers and scientists who oversee all aspects of the Hubble mission. Under its direction, an integrated group of civil servants and contractors at Goddard collectively known as the operations team is responsible for Hubble’s mission operations—those functions of the mission that operate together to assure the health, safety, and performance of the spacecraft. Examples include monitoring and adjusting the spacecraft’s subsystems (e.g. power, thermal, data management, pointing control, etc.), flight software development, sustaining engineering of the control center hardware and software, and systems administration of the network and ground system components. A separate contractor team at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore is similarly responsible for science operations—the functions necessary to award telescope time, schedule observations, calibrate the received data, and archive the datasets. Working closely together, Goddard and the STScI operate Hubble 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, though most of the commanding to the telescope and receipt of its science data is accomplished by computers via automated operations.
  • Edited B-Roll From Hubble 25th Anniversary NASA Social
    2015.04.23
    Edited NATSOUND package from the NASA Social held April 23rd for Hubble's 25th anniversary. NASA Social attendees visited the Hubble Control Room at Goddard Space Flight Center. They also heard from engineers during their visit and even got to see the types of tools astronauts used to service Hubble.

Liveshots

Footage from live Hubble news campaigns
  • Hubble Wraps Its 30th Year with Dazzling New Images Live Shots
    2020.12.03
    When asked about what the universe looks like, you probably think of Hubble images. The Hubble Space Telescope has inspired scientists and the public alike with its views of the universe for three decades. This year, Hubble celebrated its 30th anniversary, and NASA is marking the occasion by releasing a set of 30 new images from its archives. The sparkling new collection features images of star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies, from The Caldwell Catalog - a special catalog of the best celestial targets for amateur astronomers- including some that can be seen from your viewers’ backyard. With these images, Hubble continues to inspire the world to marvel at the beauty of our universe.
  • World’s Most Famous Space Telescope Marks 30 Years of Exploration Live Shots
    2020.04.17
    When you think of the universe, what do you imagine? Chances are the colorful pictures of galaxies and star clusters that come into view are from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. For 30 years, the bus-sized telescope has been orbiting the Earth as one of humanity’s most important windows to the universe. Hubble was designed to last 15 years, but on April 24 it will mark three decades in space.
  • Hubble Captures New Look At Ancient Comet From Beyond our Solar System Live Shots
    2019.12.09
    The Hubble Space Telescope just captured a new image of the first known interstellar comet as it speeds towards our Sun. The comet named 2I/Borisov is an ancient ball of ice, rock and dust that formed in a distant star system. Scientists are clamoring to study this frozen time capsule shrouded in mystery, looking for clues of what may lie beyond our solar system. Chat with Hubble scientists to learn about the out-of-this-solar-system discovery, find out what this comet can teach us about what lies beyond our own solar system and learn how your viewers may be able to see this interstellar visitor for themselves.
  • Astronauts Celebrate Hubble Servicing Mission Live Shots
    2019.05.08
    Hubble Captures Largest Deep View Of The Universe It’s Ever Assembled Image Possible Thanks to Astronaut Upgrades Conducted A Decade Ago Chat with NASA ASTRONAUTS Who Worked on the Telescope in Space! When it launched in 1990, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope was only designed to last 15 years. Last month, the iconic telescope celebrated 29 years of science thanks in large part to the brave astronauts who upgraded it over five separate missions. It’s been 10 years this week since astronauts last visited Hubble, and the telescope continues to deliver breathtaking images and new science results. To date Hubble has taken more than
  • Hubble Space Telescope Celebrates 28 Years: Live Interviews on April 20, 2018
    2018.04.12
    Hubble Space Telescope Celebrates 28 Years of Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe World’s Iconic Telescope Reveals Another Breathtaking New View for Its Anniversary
    Space exploration and discovery has come a long way since NASA launched the Hubble Space Telescope in 1990. Two awe-inspiring new images of the Lagoon Nebula will be revealed on Hubble’s 28th anniversary — a testament to the telescope’s longevity and continuous innovation. Astronauts have performed five servicing missions to install more advanced technology on Hubble over its lifetime, making it possible for the telescope to continue pushing the boundaries of exploration. The spectacular new images of the heart of the Lagoon Nebula will showcase a region that is just 4,000 light-years away from Earth and has never been seen before in such exquisite detail. Hubble captured two stunning versions of the nebula — one image in the visible light spectrum and one in the infrared. The star-filled images showcase billowing clouds of gas and streamers of dust at the heart of this stellar nursery, the birthplace of stars. Suggested Questions: 1. What are we seeing in this new image being released of the Lagoon Nebula? 2. How can viewers find the Lagoon Nebula in the night sky? 3. The Hubble Space Telescope is celebrating its 28th anniversary. How has Hubble changed our understanding of the universe? 4. What other interesting discoveries has Hubble made lately? 5. Where can we learn more? Questions for longer interviews: 1. How is Hubble doing after being in orbit for 28 years? 2. We’ve been living in a golden era of discovery, and Hubble has been a big part of that science. How far have we come since the launch of Hubble? 3. What are some interesting things Hubble has seen in our own solar system? Live Shot Details: Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland Scientists: Dr. Jeffrey Hayes / NASA Scientist —or— Dr. Michelle Thaller / NASA Scientist —or— Dr. Antonella Nota / ESA Hubble Project Scientist —or— Dr. Heidi Hammel / AURA Planetary Scientist —or— Dr. Susana Deustua / Associate Scientist/ Space Telescope Science Institute [en Español]
  • Hubble Sees Summer Storms on Mars and Saturn
    2018.07.26
    Next weekend Mars will be at its closest to Earth in 15 years, appearing as a bright red-orange jewel in the night sky. To celebrate this celestial event, NASA will release a stunning new image of Mars captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. This summer, Hubble has been busy watching out-of-this-world weather — a blustery dust storm on Mars and churning clouds on Saturn. Join Hubble Space Telescope scientists from 6:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. EDT on Friday, July 27, for a special look at Hubble’s latest stormy portraits of the planets, as well as tips for sighting them in the night sky. For almost three decades Hubble has shown us the wonders of our own solar system — from Mars, Jupiter and Saturn to Uranus and Neptune. Hubble’s Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program makes long-term observations of the outer planets to understand their atmospheric dynamics and evolution as gas giants. To schedule an interview, fill out this form. If you have any questions, contact: Micheala Sosby | micheala.m.sosby@nasa.gov
  • A Hubble Holiday Surprise Hides In Plain Sight Among The Geminid Meteor Shower Live Shots
    2017.12.06
    One of the Best Meteor Showers of the Year Peaks Next Week
    Hubble Scientists Reveal a New Holiday Image and Share Their Favorite Skywatching Tips
  • Hubble Messier Catalog
    2017.10.30
    The Messier catalog includes some of the most fascinating astronomical objects that can be observed from Earth’s Northern Hemisphere. Among them are deep-sky objects that can be viewed in stunning detail using larger telescopes but are also bright enough to be seen through a small telescope. This characteristic makes Messier objects extremely popular targets for amateur astronomers possessing all levels of experience and equipment. They are so popular, in fact, that they have inspired a special award from the Astronomical League (an organization for amateur astronomers) given to observers who are able to spot each of these objects. Those who succeed receive a certificate and are given the distinction of being in the Messier Club.
  • Galaxies Galore! Hubble's Last 'Frontier Fields' Image Live Shots
    2017.05.01
    Galaxies Galore! A lot of Galaxies Need Guarding in Hubble’s Latest View
    New ‘Frontier Field’ Image Takes us on an Adventure to the Edges of the Universe

    The Hubble Space Telescope is humanity’s window to the cosmos. Just in time for the release of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Hubble’s newest and final ‘Frontier Field’ image shows just how vast and crowded our universe is. There are thousands of galaxies in the narrow field of sky Hubble looked at – an area no bigger than looking at the sky through a soda straw. Thanks to Hubble, scientists estimate there are some two trillion galaxies. Now that’s a lot of galaxies in need of guarding!

    So what exactly is a galaxy and what kind of superpower did Hubble use to capture this new image? Chat with NASA on Friday, May 5, from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. ET to show your viewers this new deep field image, and find out how Hubble uses nature’s own magnifying lens to see some of the faintest galaxies ever seen.

    Hubble’s Frontier Fields program uses the gravitational power of massive galaxy clusters deep in space to magnify the light of galaxies too faint and distant for Hubble to see directly. The resulting image is like a funhouse mirror, showing galaxies that appear distorted and stretched. This gravitational lensing effect is the best tool for finding and studying one of nature’s biggest secrets, something called dark matter.

    **To book a window contact**
    Michelle Handleman/ michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov/ 301-286-0918

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18/LO: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Lower| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12051.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:
    1. What is a galaxy and can you show us some that need guarding?
    2. What superpower did Hubble use to see faint and distant galaxies in this new image?
    3. Dark matter sounds like something a villain would use. How do missions like Hubble help us learn about one of nature’s biggest secrets?
    4. Hubble just celebrated its 27th birthday. What’s next for the famous space telescope?
    5. Where can we see this beautiful image and learn more about Hubble?


    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Greenbelt, Maryland

    Interviews with:
    Jim Jeletic / Hubble Space Telescope Deputy Project Manager
    Dr. Padi Boyd / NASA Scientist
    Dr. Dan Coe / Astronomer / Space Telescope Science Institute
    Dr. Susana Deustua / Associate Scientist / Space Telescope Science Institute [Spanish interviews]

    Video: NASA will roll all insert videos during live interviews. If needed, stations can roll a clean feed of all video at 5:45 a.m. ET on May 5, 2017, at the above listed satellite.

    Learn more: nasa.gov/hubble
    Follow us: @NASAHubble

  • Exoplanet Live Shots 2.23.17
    2017.02.21
    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed the first known system of seven Earth-size planets around a single star. Three of these planets are firmly located in the habitable zone, the area around the parent star where a rocky planet is most likely to have liquid water. You can find graphics HERE that go with this story. The discovery sets a new record for greatest number of habitable-zone planets found around a single star outside our solar system. All of these seven planets could have liquid water–key to life as we know it–under the right atmospheric conditions, but the chances are highest with the three in the habitable zone.

    Scientists are available for live TV or radio interviews on Thursday, Feb. 23, from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EST to share these exciting results with your morning viewers, and talk about how NASA is exploring these strange new worlds. We will also give you a sneak peek into upcoming NASA missions that will further the search for life in the universe.

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18Upper: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Upper| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12069.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    **** To book a window contact **** Michelle Handleman/ michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov/ 301-286-0918

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:

    Dr. Paul Hertz / Director, Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Headquarters Washington

    Dr. Padi Boyd / Chief , Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory

    Dr. Nikole Lewis / Astronomer, Space Telescope Science Institute

    Dr. Hannah Wakeford / NASA Scientist

  • New Hubble "Frontier Field" Image Live Shots
    2016.07.15

    NASA scientists chatted about the new FRONTIER FIELD image from the Hubble Space Telescope that takes us to the very edge of space and time. This is one of Hubble’s deepest views yet of the universe. There are thousands of galaxies in this image, each teeming with billions of stars, home to many strange distant worlds. Just as Captain Kirk and the crew of the Starship Enterprise have stretched our imagination for the last 50 years, for a quarter century Hubble has turned science fiction into science fact.

    Hubble’s Frontier Fields program uses the power of massive galaxy clusters deep in space. The gravity of these clusters is so massive that it distorts and magnifies the light around it, allowing us to see the very faint light of the distant galaxies behind it.

    **** To book a window contact **** Michelle Handleman / michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov / 301-286-0918

    Suggested Questions:

    For more than a quarter century, Hubble has inspired generations of people around the world with its views of the universe. Can you show us the new "Frontier Field" image?

    So this image is literally taking us back to the very edge of space and time. How is this image helping us explore the final frontier?

    Star Trek has stretched our imagination for 50 years. The Starship Enterprise (and its successors) explored hundreds of strange new worlds. How does Hubble compare in seeking out life and new civilizations?

    Star Trek helped us imagine many wonders out there in the Final Frontier. What are some of the wildest things Hubble has seen?

    Where can we learn more? Can you #SpotHubble in everyday life? Find more Hubble on Twitter @NASA_Hubble

  • New Hubble Image Of Mars Live Shots. Great Viewing Opportunity Of The Red Planet In Late May
    2016.05.13
    Best Viewing Opportunity Of The Red Planet in Two Years

    Mars Makes Major Comeback in Night Sky During Alignment With Earth

    NASA To Release New Hubble Space Telescope Image of Mars

    The night sky in late May will have a very special feature this year. That’s because Mars will shine bigger and brighter than any other time in the past two years as the Red Planet approaches the closest point in its orbit to Earth. No fancy telescopes are needed. You’ll be able to spot the Red Planet with the naked eye.

    Mars and Earth travel at different speeds in their elliptical orbits around the sun. While they line up every 26 months, this will be Mars’ closest orbit to Earth since 2005!

    The Hubble Space Telescope will take advantage of this great viewing opportunity and turn its gaze toward Mars to capture a new, detailed snapshot of the Red Planet.

    NASA scientists are available on Friday, May 20th from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EDT to show your viewers Hubble’s newest image of Mars, tell you how you can spot Mars next weekend and show you some of Hubble’s other images of planets, moons, and fascinating objects in our solar system.

    For 26 years, Hubble has taken stunning pictures of the planets right here in our solar system, in addition to its more than a million observations of far away galaxies and nebulae. These views of the planets in our solar system have provided scientists with a treasure trove of data about Earth’s closest neighbors.

    ****To book a window*** Contact: Michelle Handleman/ michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov/ 301-286-0918 work

    HD Satellite Coordinates for AMC9-K17: AMC-9 Ku-band Xp 17 Slot AB| 83.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12045.8 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded Click to learn more about Hubble's new Mars image. Or on Twitter @NASA_Hubble More about Mars in the night sky.

  • Hubble Sees A Cosmic "Lightsaber" Live Shots
    2015.12.17
    Far, far away in our own galaxy, cosmic forces are awakening in a newborn star seen by the Hubble Space Telescope. On Friday, Dec. 18th, scientists will show you a new image of a newborn star right here in our Milky Way galaxy, shooting jets into space that resemble a cosmic “lightsaber.”

    Since Hubble’s launch in 1990, Hubble has given humankind an unobstructed view of the universe that has rewritten the textbooks and profoundly transformed our understanding of the cosmos and our place among the stars. Hubble has given us a closer look at galaxies far, far away, and the planets and moons right here in our solar system. This is helping NASA in its quest to understand the solar system and beyond. Hubble continues to generate powerful images that show us the real ‘star wars,’ turning science fiction into science fact. Hubble Sees the Force Awakening in a Newborn Star. Click to download the new "lightsaber" image. Extended Hubble resource collection with additional videos, interviews, animations and packages

  • Hubble 25th Anniversary Live Shot Resource Page
    2015.04.20
    NASA Scientsts talk about the 25th anniversary of the Hubble Space Telescope. Also includes edited b-roll.

Spacecraft Animations

Animations of the Hubble Space Telescope.