Live Shots Gallery Collection

Collection of live shot pages of b-roll and interviews

Content Contact:

2018 Live Shots

Collection of live shots done in 2018
  • The Numbers Are In: Where Does 2017 Rank for Global Temperatures? Live Shots 1.18.18
    2018.01.16
    The Numbers Are In: Where Does 2017 Rank for Global Temperatures?
    NASA Scientists Available January 19th To Share Latest With Your Viewers

    In many parts of the United States, 2017 was a year of extremes: deadly hurricanes, devastating flooding and wildfires but also record-breaking Arctic temperatures across much of the country and surprising snowfall in areas of the country that don’t usually see much of the white, fluffy stuff. New York City experienced its coldest New Year’s Eve in 55 years, and Los Angeles hosted the hottest World Series game ever. But where does 2017 rank globally in the temperature record books?

    Join NASA scientists from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EST on Friday, Jan. 19 to find out where 2017 global temperatures rank, and find out how NASA uses its unique vantage point from space to track how the Earth is responding to a warming climate.

    Despite year-to-year changes, average temperatures around the globe remain on a steady, long-term upward trend. In fact, 17 of the 18 warmest years on record have occurred since 2001. NASA scientists will break down where 2017 stands in the record books, and what role warmer temperatures may have played in the extreme events that the U.S. experienced last year.

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18/Upper: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Upper| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12069.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    *****To book a window contact**** Michelle Handleman / Michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov / 301-286-0918

    Suggested Questions:
    1. NASA just released data about 2017. Tell us where 2017 ranks among the warmest years on record?

    2. December was unusually cold for much of the U.S. How does that compare to what we saw elsewhere around the world last month?
    3. Last year was a wild year for weather in the United States/our area. How does what we saw overall in the U.S. in 2017 relate to the broader global picture? 

    4. What are some of the other effects we’re seeing as temperatures rise?
    5. Where can we learn more?

    Questions For Longer Interviews:
    1. What is an El Niño and what part has this weather pattern played in global temperatures in recent years?
    2. How might shifting patterns of El Niño to a possible La Nina impact us this year?
    3. What is driving our planet’s long term warming trend?
    4. One or two degree temperature increases don’t sound like much. Why is this significant?
    5. NASA has a global perspective here on Earth and in space. How do NASA’s observations from space help us understand the changing climate?

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:
    Dr. Doug Morton / NASA Scientist (English and Portuguese)
    Dr. Lesley Ott / NASA Scientist
    Dr. Eric Brown De Colstoun / NASA Scientist (en Español)

  • ‘Super, Blue Blood Moon’ Will Leave Spectators in Awe Live Shots
    2018.01.24
    ‘Super, Blue Blood Moon’ Will Leave Spectators in Awe on Jan. 31 br>NASA Scientists Available Jan. 30 to Show Viewers How to See the Magnificent Moon.

    It’s the Moon’s turn to shine next week, coming on the heels of the solar eclipse last August. Serendipity strikes on Wednesday, Jan. 31 as a total lunar eclipse will happen at the same time as a supermoon and a blue Moon. This lunar trifecta is the first of its kind in 35 years and will not occur again until 2037.

    Join NASA scientists from 6:00-11:30 a.m. EST on Tuesday, Jan. 30 – the day before the rare event – to find out how your viewers can experience the ‘Super, Blue, Blood Moon’ and learn more about our closest celestial neighbor.

    People around the world will experience a bigger and brighter Moon caused by the Moon’s closest approach to Earth in its elliptical orbit. Viewers in the central and western U.S., Australia, New Zealand and Eastern Asia will get the added bonus of seeing a lunar eclipse – giving the Moon a copper glow. NASA scientists are using the lunar eclipse as an opportunity to study what happens when the Moon goes from baking in the Sun to being in the cold shadow of the Earth. A blue Moon occurs on the second full Moon of a calendar month. The chance alignment happens once in a ‘blue Moon.’

    **** To book a window contact: michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov/ 301-286-0918 ****

    HD Satellite Digital Coordinates for G17-K18/Upper: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Upper| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12069.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded Suggested Questions:
    1. What is the best way to watch the ‘Super, Blue Blood Moon?’
    2. How rare is the combination of a lunar eclipse, super and blue Moon?
    3. NASA has been studying the Moon with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter – or LRO – for eight years. What has been most surprising about NASA’s observations of the Moon?
    4. How can NASA’s understanding of our Moon lead to further space exploration?
    5. Where can we learn more about our Moon and NASA’s observations of it?

    Questions for longer interviews:
    1. What does the lunar eclipse mean for a spacecraft orbiting the Moon?
    2. During the total solar eclipse, people in the path of totality experienced a drop in temperature. How will the temperature on the Moon be affected by this eclipse?
    3. The 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 is approaching. What is there left to learn about the Moon?
    4. When will this unusual combination of a lunar eclipse, super and blue Moon occur again?

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:
    Dr. Noah Petro / NASA Scientist / LRO Deputy Project Scientist
    Dr. Michelle Thaller / NASA Scientist
    Dr. Jake Bleacher / NASA Scientist
    Dr. Geronimo Villanueva / NASA Scientist [en Español]

  • Space Communications Live Interviews - Feb. 15, 2018
    2018.02.07
    Next Generation of Space Exploration Starts at NASA New Straight out of Sci-Fi Laser Technology Will Advance Space Communications

    We’ve all been frustrated with spotty cell coverage. NASA faced a similar issue, in space. Fifty years ago, astronauts were only able to communicate with Earth about 15 percent of the time. Thanks to NASA’s advances in space communications, every word and heartbeat from astronauts circling 250 miles above Earth aboard the International Space Station comes down to Mission Control in near real-time. NASA’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) bring in data from over 40 missions including the space station.

    Have you ever wondered how NASA communicates with astronauts and streams live video from space? Or how striking images of the cosmos get back to Earth? Join NASA space communications experts from 6:00-11:30 a.m. ET on Thursday, Feb. 15, to learn about this amazing technology and get a preview of how NASA is using lasers to take space communications and navigation to the next level for future exploration missions.

    The space communications network that allows NASA astronauts and low-Earth orbiting satellites to communicate with the ground is entering a new age of exploration and technology. The latest TDRS launched on Aug. 18, 2017. Next week, TDRS-13 will officially join NASA’s Space Network. With its addition, the TDRS fleet will have more satellites than ever before, working together to enable science discoveries and exploration. Future communications satellites will use lasers to relay even more data at once.

    *****Schedule a live or taped interview***** Clare Skelly / clare.a.skelly@nasa.gov / 301-286-4994


    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18/Upper: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Upper| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12069.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions: 1. How has communicating with astronauts changed since the Apollo missions? 2. NASA’s space communications network has more satellites than ever before working to bring back data from space. What does the newest satellite add to the network? 3. How will NASA eventually use ‘space lasers’ to advance this technology? 4. NASA spacecraft capture stunning imagery of everything from our home planet to the cosmos. What kinds of missions does TDRS support? 5. Where can we learn more?

    Extra Questions for Longer Interviews: 1. How will NASA take future generations of space communications satellites to the next level? 2. What is NASA doing to develop and perfect laser communications technology? 3. NASA has three communications networks – the Near Earth Network, Space Network and Deep Space Network. How are they different? 4. How would you describe the TDRS legacy?

    Location: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Interview Talent: David Littmann/TDRS Project Manager Cheryl Gramling/Navigation Systems Engineer Greg Heckler/Telecommunications Systems Manager Sandra Cauffman/Deputy Director of the Earth Science Division at NASA Headquarters [Spanish speaker]

    Video: NASA will roll all insert videos during live interviews. If needed, stations can roll a clean feed of all video at 5:45 a.m. ET on Feb. 15, at the above listed satellite. Canned interviews and b-roll will be available on this page starting at 6 p.m. on Feb. 14.

    For more visit: https://esc.gsfc.nasa.gov/ and @NASA_TDRS

  • Faster Weather Tracking On The Way. Feb. 23 Live Shots About Upcoming Launch Of GOES-S
    2018.02.20
    Calling All Meteorologists! Faster Weather Tracking On The Way

    U.S. Will Now Have Two of the Most Advanced Weather Satellites Ever, Operating in Tandem
    NOAA Scientists Available Feb. 23 to Talk about New GOES-S Satellite Launching Next Week

    Last year’s historic hurricanes and wildfires and extreme storm systems called for fast and reliable weather forecasting. On Thursday, March 1, NASA will launch NOAA’s newest weather satellite, GOES-S, which will scan the Earth five times faster and at four times the image resolution. GOES-S is the second of NOAA’s new series of advanced geostationary weather satellites. With it, the United States will now have two of the most advanced weather satellites working in tandem to provide unprecedented coverage across the entire U.S. and most of the Western Hemisphere, from the west coast of Africa to New Zealand. This includes the northeastern Pacific, the birthplace of many weather systems that affect the continental U.S., and where there is comparatively little data.

    Join NOAA scientists from 6:00 a.m. -12:00 p.m. ET on Friday, Feb. 23 — just days before launch — to learn how GOES-S will help forecasters predict and emergency officials plan for future extreme weather and natural disasters.

    The new GOES-S satellite has triple the number of channels from older geostationary weather satellites, which allow it to see in different wavelengths of light, including a new near-infrared band, which can discern between snow, ice and clouds. GOES-S will track storm systems, lightning, wildfires, coastal fog and other weather hazards that threaten the U.S. – particularly in the western U.S., Hawaii and Alaska. It will also give forecasters and emergency responders more time to prepare for severe weather across the U.S. as storm systems move east. GOES-S is a joint collaboration between NOAA and NASA.
    **Schedule a live or taped interview** Michelle Handleman / michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov / 301-286-0918

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K24/Lower: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 24 Slot Lower| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12171.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:
    1. How will the newest, most-advanced GOES satellite improve weather forecasts?
    2. Last year, we saw destructive hurricanes, record wildfire season and devastating flooding. How will GOES-S help us better predict and prepare for extreme weather?
    3. How will new technology on GOES-S help my local weather forecasts?
    4. Fog can be responsible for flight delays all over the country. How will GOES-S help with aviation forecasts?
    5. Where can we learn more about the new satellite as it prepares to launch?

    Questions for longer interviews:
    1. What is a geostationary satellite?
    2. How will the new GOES-S satellite complement other orbiting weather satellites?
    3. What type of data will GOES-S provide compared with the satellite it’s replacing?
    4. What kind of economic benefits might come from this satellite?
    5. How do NASA and NOAA work together to use the vantage point of space to better understand the Earth’s system?

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:
    Joe Pica / NOAA National Weather Service, Director of Observations
    Jamese Sims / GOES-R Satellite Products Manager
    Matt Seybold /GOES-R Data Operations Manager and Product Readiness & Operations Lead Vanessa Griffin / NOAA, Director of the Office of Satellite and Product Operations
    Jose Galvez /meteorologist, International Desk, NOAA's Weather Prediction Center

  • NASA Preparing to Launch New Planet-Hunting Mission Live Shots
    2018.04.10
    NASA Preparing to Launch New Planet Hunting Mission Next Week
    Mission Expected to Discover Thousands of New Worlds Orbiting Nearby Stars
    NASA Scientists Available to Speak On the Hunt For New Worlds
    The hunt is on to discover new and exciting worlds! NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite – TESS – is scheduled to launch April 16 to find thousands of planets orbiting stars outside our solar system, known as exoplanets. In the past ten years, NASA has discovered and studied thousands of these planets – including the TRAPPIST-1 system, which could have the ingredients to support life. TESS is expected to add thousands more planets to this growing list during its two-year mission, looking at the nearest and brightest stars in our galaxy to see if there are worlds hiding in their light.

    From molten lava and frigid icy planets, to bizarre places that rain rubies and sapphires and water-covered worlds, the possibilities of new worlds for the planet-hunter to find are limitless. Are Earth and the other planets in our solar system unique? Join NASA scientists from 6:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, April 10 – days before the launch – as they share some of the exciting discoveries they hope to find with the TESS mission.

    TESS will find promising planets that other NASA telescopes – like the Hubble Space Telescope and future James Webb Space Telescope – could look at in more detail to determine what their atmospheres are made of, and whether these unknown worlds could potentially support life. Suggested Questions:
    1. What is an exoplanet and why are scientists excited about them?
    2. How will this new mission help NASA in the search for life?
    3. Will this planet-hunter change the way we look at the stars in the night sky?
    4. Previous telescopes have found really unusual worlds. What kinds of planets are you looking forward to TESS discovering?
    5. Where can we learn more?
    Questions for longer interviews:
    1. Where will TESS orbit?
    2. What has been the biggest surprise in searching for exoplanets?
    3. How will TESS detect planets?
    4. What makes TESS different than other planet hunter missions?
    5. What does it look like when a planet crosses in front of the parent star?
    Live Shot Details: Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:
    Dr. Paul Hertz / NASA Director of Astrophysics
    —or—
    Dr. Joshua Schlieder / NASA Scientist
    —or—
    Dr. Jennifer Burt / MIT Torres postdoctoral fellow
    —or—
    Natalia Guerrero / MIT Kavli TESS Objects of Interest Deputy Manager [ en Español ]z

  • Hubble Space Telescope Celebrates 28 Years: Live Interviews on April 20, 2018
    2018.04.12
    Hubble Space Telescope Celebrates 28 Years of Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe World’s Iconic Telescope Reveals Another Breathtaking New View for Its Anniversary
    Space exploration and discovery has come a long way since NASA launched the Hubble Space Telescope in 1990. Two awe-inspiring new images of the Lagoon Nebula will be revealed on Hubble’s 28th anniversary — a testament to the telescope’s longevity and continuous innovation. Astronauts have performed five servicing missions to install more advanced technology on Hubble over its lifetime, making it possible for the telescope to continue pushing the boundaries of exploration. The spectacular new images of the heart of the Lagoon Nebula will showcase a region that is just 4,000 light-years away from Earth and has never been seen before in such exquisite detail. Hubble captured two stunning versions of the nebula — one image in the visible light spectrum and one in the infrared. The star-filled images showcase billowing clouds of gas and streamers of dust at the heart of this stellar nursery, the birthplace of stars. Suggested Questions: 1. What are we seeing in this new image being released of the Lagoon Nebula? 2. How can viewers find the Lagoon Nebula in the night sky? 3. The Hubble Space Telescope is celebrating its 28th anniversary. How has Hubble changed our understanding of the universe? 4. What other interesting discoveries has Hubble made lately? 5. Where can we learn more? Questions for longer interviews: 1. How is Hubble doing after being in orbit for 28 years? 2. We’ve been living in a golden era of discovery, and Hubble has been a big part of that science. How far have we come since the launch of Hubble? 3. What are some interesting things Hubble has seen in our own solar system? Live Shot Details: Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland Scientists: Dr. Jeffrey Hayes / NASA Scientist —or— Dr. Michelle Thaller / NASA Scientist —or— Dr. Antonella Nota / ESA Hubble Project Scientist —or— Dr. Heidi Hammel / AURA Planetary Scientist —or— Dr. Susana Deustua / Associate Scientist/ Space Telescope Science Institute [en Español]

2017 Live Shots

Collection of live shots done in 2017
  • Snow Live Shots (Feb. 17, 2017)
    2017.02.08
    NASA Views Snow from Space: What a Difference a Year Makes Snow doesn’t fall everywhere, but how much falls and where has global consequences
    The snapshot of snow from space tells a different story every year. Last January, a winter storm pummeled the east coast and broke several snowfall records. This winter the Sierra Nevada was hit by consecutive storms, each one piling more snow on top of the last storm's snow. NASA’s view from space highlights these dramatic differences, but the story is incomplete.
    More than a sixth of the world’s population relies on melt water from seasonal snowpack and glaciers, but it is challenging to measure the volume and depth of snow cover, especially in remote locations and dense forests. Determining exactly how much snow is on the ground globally and understanding the contribution of winter storms to the world’s water resources are key pieces to the Earth system puzzle.
    NASA is in the field right now, testing techniques and technologies for measuring snow’s water content. Join NASA scientists on Friday, February 17, from 6:00 a.m – 11:30 a.m. EST to show your viewers NASA’s snow imagery and discuss strides towards improved space-based measurement of snow on Earth.

    The effects of snow are global. For example, California’s Central Valley, which relies on seasonal snow melt, constitutes only 2 percent of US cropland, yet it produces nearly half the nation’s fruits and nuts. The benefits of snow measurements are huge because of the importance of snow to agriculture, water security, natural hazards and more.
    Thanks to a half-century of snow observations, we know these amazing facts, which are crucial to understanding what’s necessary to advance snow measurements.
    • More than one-sixth of the world’s population (1.2 billion people) relies on melt water from snowpack and glaciers.
    • Up to 70 percent of water resources in the western United States are from snow melt. In California, more than 70 percent of water from the San Joaquin River, which originates from Sierra Nevada snow, is used to irrigate the Central Valley.
    • 60 million people in the U.S. rely on snowmelt as their primary source of freshwater.
    • Globally, 30 percent of land area gets covered by snow and about half of the snow cover area has tree cover of some sort.
    • Since 1967, a million square miles of spring snow cover has disappeared from the Northern Hemisphere, an area the size of the entire southwestern United States.
    • NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM) tracks falling snow, including off the coast where few observations exist, in the mountains where ground-based radar may have challenges, and even at the tops of hurricanes.
    • Snowflakes (crystals) have six sides, but most of the snowflakes we see are multiple crystals stuck together. Snow crystals stick together and begin to change or metamorphose as soon as they fall to the ground.
    • The same sensing technology used to measure seasonal snowpack on Earth can be used to measure ice on Mars.

    *** To Book a Window *** Contact Clare Skelly – clare.a.skelly@nasa.gov / 301-286-4994 (office)

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18Upper: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Upper| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12069.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded


    Suggested Questions:
    1. NASA satellites see snow cover from space. How does this winter compare to previous years?
    2. NASA scientists are in the field right now testing advanced technologies for measuring snow. How will these new measurements be used? [OR] Up to 70 percent of water resources in the western United States are from snow melt. California got heavy snow in January, does that mean the drought is over?
    3. Can NASA see falling snow from space?
    4. How does snow impact parts of the country that rarely see any snowfall?
    6. Where can we learn more?
    Scientists:
    Dorothy Hall / NASA Scientist
    —or—
    Matthew Rodell / NASA Scientist
    —or—
    Dalia Kirschbaum / NASA Scientist

  • Exoplanet Live Shots 2.23.17
    2017.02.21
    NASA will hold a news conference at 1:00 p.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 22, to present new findings on planets that orbit stars other than our sun, known as exoplanets. The event will air live on NASA Television and the agency's website.

    Scientists are available for live TV or radio interviews on Thursday, Feb. 23, from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EST to share these exciting results with your morning viewers, and talk about how NASA is exploring these strange new worlds. We will also give you a sneak peek into upcoming NASA missions that will further the search for life in the universe.

    **Due to an embargo, we will send out additional details at 1:00 pm on Wednesday, Feb. 22**

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18Upper: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Upper| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12069.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    **** To book a window contact **** Michelle Handleman/ michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov/ 301-286-0918

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:

    Dr. Paul Hertz / Director, Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Headquarters Washington

    Dr. Padi Boyd / Chief , Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory

    Dr. Nikole Lewis / Astronomer, Space Telescope Science Institute

    Dr. Hannah Wakeford / NASA Scientist

  • 2017 Spring Equinox Live Shots
    2017.03.15

    March 20 Equinox Marks The Start Of Spring In The Northern Hemisphere

    Dance Of The Solar System Is The First Solar Event Of 2017.

    Stay Tuned For The Big Event Of 2017, The August Solar Eclipse!

    It may not feel like it this week in parts of the country, but spring begins in just a few days. March 20 kicks off the first day of astronomical spring in the Northern Hemisphere. On March 20, the day of the spring Equinox, the sun will pass directly over the Earth’s equator, giving the entire planet equal hours of day and night. This is the seasonal marker in Earth’s orbit around the sun when daylight hours begin to get longer than night.

    This dance of the solar system is just one celestial event we’ll see this year. On August 21 all 50 states in the U.S. will be in prime position to see a partial or even a total solar eclipse, which happens when the moon is in perfect position to blot out the sun’s bright disk. The last time the U.S. saw a coast-to-coast solar eclipse was in 1918! The path of totality runs from Oregon to South Carolina.

    NASA will lead an unprecedented science initiative during the eclipse that will draw on the collaboration of the public to help collect images, data and even temperature readings from across the nation during the hour-and-a-half it takes to cross the continent.

    NASA scientists are available on Monday, March 20 from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EDT to help your viewers ring in the new season and talk about the big solar event this August.

    *** To book a window contact **** Michelle Handleman / michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov/ 301-286-0918

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18Upper: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Upper| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12069.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:

    1. What is an equinox?

    2. There is an exciting event happening this year: a total solar eclipse! When is this happening?

    3. NASA will be doing some pretty cool science during the eclipse. How is NASA using the eclipse to study the sun and Earth?

    4. How do eclipses help us find planets orbiting other stars?

    5. Where can we learn more?

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:

    Dr. Alex Young/ NASA Scientist

    Dr. Yari Collado-Vega / NASA Scientist [Interviews in Spanish]

    Video: NASA will roll all insert videos during live interviews. If needed, stations can roll a clean feed of all video at 5:45 a.m. EDT on March 20, at the above listed satellite.

  • James Webb Space Telescope Live Shots - March 30, 2017
    2017.03.21
    A rare behind-the-scenes look at NASA’s largest and most powerful space telescope
    See inside the cleanroom where the James Webb Space Telescope is being built right now
    Webb will look further back in time to find the first galaxies that formed in the early universe

    The James Webb Space Telescope stands tall in the world’s largest cleanroom at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center for the last time. Give your viewers a behind the scenes look at the cleanroom on Thursday, March 30 from 6 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. ET to see the engineering marvel and learn what makes Webb the biggest and most powerful space telescope ever built.

    Fully assembled, the Webb telescope is as tall as a three-story building. The size of the telescope is significant for the kinds of observations it will make. Webb will find the very first galaxies that formed after the Big Bang, answer fundamental questions about the evolution of our universe, and help in the search for life and habitable planets. Webb’s detectors can record extremely faint signals that will help us study planetary systems around other stars, and maybe even determine if any of the seven recently discovered Earth-sized planets orbiting the nearby TRAPPIST-1 star could support life.

    After rigorous testing at NASA Goddard, the Webb telescope is one step closer to launch. Engineers spent months testing space hardware in vibration and acoustics test facilities to ensure Webb will withstand the ride into space. Next, the Webb telescope will ship to NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston for another important space environment test.

    Launching in 2018, the premiere space observatory will fold origami-style into an Ariane 5 rocket and deploy like a transformer once in space. Webb will travel nearly 1 million miles away from Earth to its home orbit at the second Lagrange point, or L2.

    **To Book a Window**
    Contact Clare Skelly – clare.a.skelly@nasa.gov / (301) 286-4994 office

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18/LO: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Lower| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12051.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded


    Suggested questions:
    1. What is the James Webb Space Telescope and how is it different from the Hubble Space Telescope?
    2. Once it launches, the Webb telescope will travel a million miles away from Earth. How do you know it will work so far away?
    3. Webb is the largest space telescope ever built. How do you build and test a three story tall telescope on Earth for what it will encounter in a very different environment in space?
    4. NASA recently discovered seven Earth-sized planets orbiting a nearby star. Will Webb study these to determine if they can support life?
    5. Where can we learn more?

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Greenbelt, Maryland

    Interviews with:
    Eric Smith / James Webb Space Telescope Program Director and Program Scientist
    Bill Ochs / James Webb Space Telescope Project Manager
    Amber Straughn / James Webb Space Telescope Science Communications Deputy Project Scientist
    Jane Rigby / James Webb Space Telescope Deputy Project Scientist for Operations
    Begoña Vila [Spanish speaker] / James Webb Space Telescope Instrument Systems Engineer

    Video: NASA will roll all insert videos during live interviews. If needed, stations can roll on a clean feed of all video at 5:45 a.m. ET on Thursday, March 30, at the above listed satellite coordinates.

    jwst.nasa.gov
    On Twitter: @NASAWebb


  • New Hubble Views Of Jupiter Live Shots
    2017.04.04
    Sky Watchers, Get Ready For Great Jupiter Viewing This Weekend!
    The Giant Planet Is At Its Closest Approach To Earth, Shining Bright In The Sky Right Now
    New Hubble Space Telescope Image Shows Giant Red Spot And Clouds In Beautiful Detail

    Go outside and look up! For the next couple of days, Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system, shines the biggest and brightest it will all year. On April 8, Jupiter will make its closest approach to Earth this year, making now the best time to view the giant planet. It’ll be up all night long! To the naked eye, Jupiter appears as a very bright star, but with a good pair of binoculars or a small telescope you should be able to see details on the planet and spot its four largest moons.

    NASA’s iconic Hubble Space Telescope will take advantage of this great viewing opportunity and capture new, detailed views of Jupiter. Hubble provides important insight into how the gas giant’s extraordinary features like its famous Great Red Spot – a giant storm that is larger than Earth – is changing. The spot is mysteriously shrinking, and Hubble is one the tools scientists use to monitor those changes.

    Join NASA scientists on Friday, April 7, from 6 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. ET to show your viewers Hubble’s newest image of Jupiter, talk about how you can spot Jupiter in the night sky and what scientists are learning about a potential water-rich moon of Jupiter.

    Jupiter and its many moons form a fascinating “mini solar system,” and Hubble’s rich collection of images and data over the last 26 years offer important clues about whether any of Jupiter’s moons – like Europa – harbor liquid water and maybe even life. This data compliments other NASA missions that are looking at the Jovian system.

    **To book a window contact** Michelle Handleman/ michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov/ 301-286-0918

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18/LO: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Lower| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12051.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:
    1. Why is tonight the best time to view Jupiter, and where can we see it in the night sky?
    2. The Hubble Space Telescope just took a new image of Jupiter. What does this new image show us about our solar system’s largest planet?
    3. Jupiter is so big that 1000 Earths could fit inside it! What are we seeing that’s interesting lately on Jupiter?
    4. Jupiter’s Great Red Spot has captivated astronomers for hundreds of years. Hubble has captured images of this spot mysteriously shrinking over the last two decades. Can you show us Hubble’s unique view of this feature?
    5. Europa is one of the best places in our solar system to look for life. What have scientists learned about Europa?6. Where can we learn more?


    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:
    Dr. Jennifer Wiseman / Hubble Senior Project Scientist
    Dr. Michelle Thaller / NASA Scientist
    Dr. Amy Simon / NASA Scientist
    Dr. Susana Deustua / Associate Scientist / Space Telescope Science Institute [interviews in Spanish]

  • Galaxies Galore! Hubble's Last 'Frontier Fields' Image Live Shots
    2017.05.01
    Galaxies Galore! A lot of Galaxies Need Guarding in Hubble’s Latest View
    New ‘Frontier Field’ Image Takes us on an Adventure to the Edges of the Universe

    The Hubble Space Telescope is humanity’s window to the cosmos. Just in time for the release of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Hubble’s newest and final ‘Frontier Field’ image shows just how vast and crowded our universe is. There are thousands of galaxies in the narrow field of sky Hubble looked at – an area no bigger than looking at the sky through a soda straw. Thanks to Hubble, scientists estimate there are some two trillion galaxies. Now that’s a lot of galaxies in need of guarding!

    So what exactly is a galaxy and what kind of superpower did Hubble use to capture this new image? Chat with NASA on Friday, May 5, from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. ET to show your viewers this new deep field image, and find out how Hubble uses nature’s own magnifying lens to see some of the faintest galaxies ever seen.

    Hubble’s Frontier Fields program uses the gravitational power of massive galaxy clusters deep in space to magnify the light of galaxies too faint and distant for Hubble to see directly. The resulting image is like a funhouse mirror, showing galaxies that appear distorted and stretched. This gravitational lensing effect is the best tool for finding and studying one of nature’s biggest secrets, something called dark matter.

    **To book a window contact**
    Michelle Handleman/ michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov/ 301-286-0918

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18/LO: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Lower| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12051.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:
    1. What is a galaxy and can you show us some that need guarding?
    2. What superpower did Hubble use to see faint and distant galaxies in this new image?
    3. Dark matter sounds like something a villain would use. How do missions like Hubble help us learn about one of nature’s biggest secrets?
    4. Hubble just celebrated its 27th birthday. What’s next for the famous space telescope?
    5. Where can we see this beautiful image and learn more about Hubble?


    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Greenbelt, Maryland

    Interviews with:
    Jim Jeletic / Hubble Space Telescope Deputy Project Manager
    Dr. Padi Boyd / NASA Scientist
    Dr. Dan Coe / Astronomer / Space Telescope Science Institute
    Dr. Susana Deustua / Associate Scientist / Space Telescope Science Institute [Spanish interviews]

    Video: NASA will roll all insert videos during live interviews. If needed, stations can roll a clean feed of all video at 5:45 a.m. ET on May 5, 2017, at the above listed satellite.

    Learn more: nasa.gov/hubble
    Follow us: @NASAHubble

  • Rare Total Solar Eclipse Is Only Two Months Away Live Shots 6.21.17
    2017.06.13
    The Countdown is on for Rare Solar Eclipse Visible Across all of North America
    For the First Time in Nearly 100 Years, Millions of Americans Coast-to-Coast Will see an Eclipse
    Chat with NASA to find out how you can catch this spectacular event

    On August 21, 2017, daylight will fade to the level of a moonlit night as millions of Americans experience one of nature’s most awe-inspiring shows – a total solar eclipse. For the first time since 1918, the dark shadow of the moon will sweep coast-to-coast across the United States, putting 14 states in the path of totality and providing a spectacular view of a partial eclipse across all 50 states.

    NASA scientists are available Wednesday, June 21, from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EDT to show your viewers the path of the eclipse, what they need to see it safely and talk about the unprecedented science that will be gathered from one of the most anticipated and widely observed celestial events in history. We’ll also give your viewers a sneak peek of a press conference about the eclipse NASA is having later that day.

    A solar eclipse happens when a rare alignment of the sun and moon casts a shadow on Earth. NASA knows the shape of the moon better than any other planetary body, and this data allows us to accurately predict the shape of the shadow as it falls on the face of Earth. While everyone in the U.S. will see the eclipse if their local skies are clear, people standing in the path of totality – completely in the moon’s shadow – will see stars and planets become visible in what is normally a sunlit sky.

    Eclipses provide an unprecedented opportunity for us to see the sun’s faint outer atmosphere in a way that cannot be replicated by current human-made instruments. Scientists believe this region of the sun is the main driver for the sun’s constant outpouring of radiation, known as the solar wind, as well as powerful bursts of solar material that can be harmful to our satellites, orbiting astronauts and power grids on the ground.

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18/LO: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Lower| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12051.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    *** To book a window contact*** /Michelle Handleman / michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov / 301-286-0918

    Suggested Questions:
    1. This is the first time in nearly 100 years that the United States will have the opportunity to see a total solar eclipse coast-to-coast! What will we see on August 21?
    2. This eclipse will be the most widely observed and shared celestial event in U.S. history. Why are scientists excited for this eclipse?
    3. Eclipses allow scientists to see the sun’s faint outer atmosphere, which is actually hotter than its surface. What can you tell us about NASA’s upcoming mission that will touch the sun?
    4. From our vantage point the sun always looks the same, but NASA satellites are showing us in high resolution just how dynamic our sun is. Can you show us some of these stunning images?
    5. How does NASA’s study of our sun help us explore the solar system?
    6. How do eclipses help scientists learn about planets orbiting stars outside our solar system?
    7. How does NASA’s mapping of the moon give us the accurate path of totality?
    8. Where can we learn more?

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:
    Dr. Alex Young / NASA Scientist
    Dr. Nicholeen Viall / NASA Scientist
    Dr. Noah Petro / NASA Scientist

    To learn more visit: Eclipse Across America On Twitter @NASASun

  • One Month & Counting: Solar Eclipse Liveshots (July 21, 2017)
    2017.07.11
    One Month and Counting: Solar Eclipse Visible From Everywhere in North America Become a Citizen Scientist During the Eclipse, Using the GLOBE Phone App Help Scientists Study What Happens When Earth Goes Dark During the Solar Eclipse

    One of the most anticipated solar eclipses in history is just a month away. The August 21 solar eclipse provides a unique opportunity to study our planet and what happens when Earth goes dark during an eclipse. It’s also an opportunity for what may be the largest citizen science project of all time.

    On that Monday, the moon’s shadow will darken the sky, temperatures drop and stars become visible in the normally day lit sky. This brief hiccup in the day-night cycle changes the amount of energy an area gets from the sun.

    NASA scientists hope to learn just how much Earth’s environment changes during the eclipse and they need help from your viewers! Using the GLOBE Observer phone application, curious eclipse onlookers can become citizen scientists. This data will help us better understand the important relationship between the sun and Earth.

    Join NASA scientists on Friday, July 21 from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. ET to find out where your viewers can see the eclipse and how they can participate, whether they’re viewing from the path of totality or not!

    Everyone in North America (weather dependent) will experience an eclipse, one of nature’s rarest shows – even those outside the path of totality. For the first time since 1918, the dark shadow of the moon will sweep coast-to-coast across the United States, putting 14 states in the path of totality and providing a spectacular view of a partial eclipse across all 50 states.

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18/LO: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Lower| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12051.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    *** To book a window contact*** Clare Skelly / clare.a.skelly@nasa.gov / (301) 286-4994
    Suggested Questions: 1. What’s going to happen one month from today? [answer includes safety information] 2. Why is this eclipse special to NASA? 3. How can our viewers participate? 4. We live on a solar powered planet. How does energy from the sun impact Earth? 5. Where can we learn more?

    Extra Questions for Longer Interviews: 6. Tell us about the new mission NASA is preparing to launch that will continue to collect information on the sun-Earth relationship. 7. It’s the middle of summer and it’s hot out! How does space weather and the solar cycle make people more vulnerable to sunburn? 8. What parts of Earth are particularly sensitive to changes in solar energy output? 9. How often do other planets experience these kinds of eclipses?

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists: Dr. Michelle Thaller / NASA Scientist Dr. Jim Garvin / NASA Scientist Dr. Alex Young / NASA Scientist Dr. Ivona Cetinic / NASA Scientist

    Video: NASA will roll all insert videos during live interviews. If needed, stations can roll a clean feed of all video at 5:45 a.m. ET on July 21, 2017, at the above listed satellite.

    Download the GLOBE Observer Application for iOS or Android. For eclipse information, maps and safety: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/ To learn more about the GLOBE program: https://observer.globe.gov/ For more information about how NASA studies Earth: https://www.nasa.gov/earth

  • Are You Ready for the Eclipse? (Live Interviews on Aug. 16, 2017)
    2017.08.06
    Are you ready for the historic solar eclipse that’s just days away? Do you have what you need to see it safely? You can see the eclipse no matter where you are in North America on Aug. 21!

    August 21 will be a day for the history books. No matter where you are in North America, you’ll get to experience the first coast-to-coast solar eclipse in nearly a century! The dark shadow of the moon will sweep from Oregon to South Carolina, putting 14 states in the path of totality and providing a spectacular view of a partial eclipse across all 50 states.

    Eclipses are an incredible experience, but it’s important to view them safely. Join NASA scientists on Wednesday, August 16, from 6:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. ET and again from 3:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. ET to show your viewers what they need to safely see the eclipse whether they’re inside the path of totality or not.

    You should never look directly at the sun! The only safe way to look directly at the sun or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or hand-held solar viewers. An eclipse is a striking phenomenon you won't want to miss, but you must carefully follow safety procedures.

    Solar eclipses happen somewhere in the world about every 18 months, but much of the time it happens over the ocean. To have an eclipse travel across so much land where millions of people live is incredibly rare, and makes for a unique opportunity for so many to witness one of nature’s most impressive shows. It’s also a great opportunity for scientists to see the sun’s faint outer atmosphere and evaluate how Earth responds to the sudden darkening.

    Take this opportunity to step outside and safely watch one of nature’s best shows!

    *** To book a window *** Contact Michelle Handleman michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov / 301-286-0918

    HD Satellite Digital Coordinates for G17-K20/Up: Galaxy 17, Ku-band Xp 20, Slot Upper | 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12109.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded


    Suggested Questions: 1. The anticipated solar eclipse is just days away! What will we experience next week? 2. We’ve been told never to look directly at the sun (even with sunglasses!). How can we enjoy this eclipse safely? 3. For those in the path of totality – when is it safe to finally take off our solar glasses? 4. We’re not in the path of totality – what interesting things should we lookout for? 5. Why are you excited for this eclipse? 6. Where can we learn more?

    Extra Questions for Longer Interviews: 7. How did a picture of an eclipse in 1919 prove Einstein’s theory of relativity? 8. Eclipses are actually a special type of transit. How are transits helping scientists search for life on other planets? 9. Why does an eclipse only last for a few minutes? 10. What happens to Earth during the eclipse? 11. If you were looking back at Earth during the eclipse what would you see? 12. How has our precise mapping of the moon helped us predict the path of eclipses? 13. How long and where was the longest ever recorded eclipse?

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Interviews With: Dr. Michelle Thaller / NASA Scientist Dr. Alex Young / NASA Scientist Dr. Jim Garvin / NASA Scientist Dr. Nicholeen Viall / NASA Scientist Dr. Eric Christian / NASA Scientist Dr. Yari Collado-Vega / NASA Scientist [Spanish speaker] Dr. Geronimo Villanueva / NASA Scientist [Spanish speaker]

    Video: NASA will roll all insert videos during live interviews. If needed, stations can roll a clean feed of all video at 5:45 a.m. on August 16, 2017, at the above listed satellite.

    https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/ @NASASun
  • First NASA Mission To Collect Asteroid Sample Will Slingshot by Earth - 9.22.17 Live Shots
    2017.09.22

    NASA's first-ever mission to collect an asteroid sample will get a boost from Earth THIS Friday. On Friday, Sept. 22, Earth's gravity will slingshot OSIRIS-REx toward its target, a near-Earth asteroid named Bennu. Scientists believe asteroids like Bennu may have seeded Earth with the organic compounds that made life possible. OSIRIS-REx — the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security-Regolith Explorer — is a robotic mission that will map this asteroid and then collect a sample that it will send home to Earth.

    OSIRIS-REx launched last year, but because Bennu's orbit is tilted six degrees in comparison to Earth's, the spacecraft needs a boost before it can get to the asteroid. Earth's game-day assist on Sept. 22nd will position it to reach Bennu's path in 2018. One of the best ways to change the trajectory of a spacecraft (without carrying extra fuel) is by using the gravity of a planet or large moon to catapult it, and that’s exactly how our home planet will help OSIRIS-REx match the asteroid's path and speed.

    Join NASA scientists on Friday, Sept. 22, from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EST – just hours before Earth slingshots OSIRIS-REx toward asteroid Bennu – to find out why this maneuver is critical to the mission’s success, and how OSIRIS-REx could uncover the materials and processes that enabled life on Earth.

    When it arrives at Bennu next year, OSIRIS-REx will map the asteroid, study its orbit and collect samples that will be sent to Earth in 2023. There are more than half a million known asteroids in our solar system, but Bennu is an ideal candidate for closer study because of its size, composition and proximity to Earth. Bennu is an artifact of the ancient solar system, a silent witness to the titanic events in our solar system’s 4.6 billion-year history.

    ****To book a window contact: Michelle Handleman/ michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov / 301-286-0918.****

    HD Satellite Digital Coordinates: HD Satellite Coordinates for SES2-K21/AB: SES 2, Ku-band Xp 21, Channel AB | 87.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12111.0 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:
    1. What is OSIRIS-REx and where is it going?
    2. Earth's gravity will slingshot OSIRIS-REx to the asteroid. How does that work?
    3. Asteroids are time capsules from the beginning of our solar system. What’s so exciting about this particular asteroid?
    4. What's it going to look like when NASA high-fives an asteroid to collect a sample?
    5. Where can we learn more?

    Extra Questions for Longer Interviews:
    1. How do you determine when and where to get the sample from Bennu?
    2. What kind of science do we hope to gain from studying Bennu, especially with samples here on Earth?
    3. What will OSIRIS-REx do that's never been done before?
    4. What will scientists do with the asteroid sample once it gets to Earth?
    5. How have previous missions helped NASA perfect the art of the gravity assist?
    6. Bennu is just one of hundreds of thousands of asteroids out there. How can studying asteroids keep us safe?

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:
    Dr. Jim Garvin / NASA Goddard Chief Scientist

    Dr. Christina Richey / OSIRIS-REx Deputy Program Scientist
    Dr. Michelle Thaller/ NASA Scientist

  • Astrophysics Live Shot 10.17.2017
    2017.10.13
    Scientists to announce new developments in gravitational-wave astronomy
    NASA Scientists Available Tuesday, Oct. 17

    Join NASA scientists from 6:00-11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 17 , for a bite-sized astrophysics lesson about an exciting discovery, which NASA will announce on Monday, Oct. 16. We'll show you some new animations and cosmic imagery to illustrate the news.

    An updated advisory with further details will be sent out Monday, Oct. 16 at 10 a.m. ET. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center will provide live satellite interviews at the below coordinates.

    ***To book a window, contact: Micheala Sosby / micheala.m.sosby@nasa.gov / 301-286-8199***

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18/Lower: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Lower| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12051.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Click for more about the PRESS CONFERENCE ON MONDAY OCTOBER 16TH. RSVP information is included

  • 11.2.2017 Live Shots: NASA To Rocket NOAA’s Newest Weather Satellite Into Space Next Week
    2017.11.02
    Calling All Meteorologists – More Accurate Seven-Day Weather Forecasts On The Way
    New NOAA Satellite Will Improve Emergency Response to Hurricanes and Wildfires
    NASA To Rocket NOAA’s Newest Weather Satellite Into Space Next Week

    In just one week the nation will add a powerful new tool to its weather satellite fleet. On Nov. 10, NASA will rocket the newest NOAA weather satellite into space. The Joint Polar Satellite System-1, or JPSS-1, will be a powerhouse, providing scientists and meteorologists with vital data about a variety of weather-related extremes like hurricanes, floods, blizzards and wildfires. The satellite will also play a critical role in improving the accuracy of forecasts from three to seven days out.

    The United States has suffered a slew of deadly, calamitous hurricanes and wildfires this year. Join NOAA scientists from 6:00-11:30 a.m. ET on Thursday, Nov. 2 — just days before launch — to learn about how timely data from JPSS will help forecasters and emergency managers get ahead of future natural disasters. JPSS-1 is the first of four new weather satellites in this series, which is a joint collaboration between NOAA and NASA.

    JPSS-1 is a polar-orbiting satellite that will collect planet-wide measurements 14 times a day from 512 miles above Earth’s surface. That kind of complete, global coverage, combined with critical observations from other weather satellites, like the GOES series, leads to more accurate forecasts. Having a clearer picture of your weather forecast not only helps you plan your weekend — it also helps meteorologists and emergency managers make important life-saving decisions about how to prepare their communities.

    *****To book a window contact: *****
 Micheala Sosby / micheala.m.sosby@nasa.gov / 301-286-8199

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18 Upper: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Upper| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12069.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:
    1. How will this new satellite improve our forecasts?
    2. How will this satellite help us be more prepared for hurricanes, snowstorms, wildfires and other extreme weather?
    3. What kinds of economic benefits can we expect from this satellite?
    4. How will this satellite work with the other weather satellites in space?
    5. Where can we learn more?

    Location: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:
    Dr. Mitch Goldberg / NOAA, Chief Program Scientist, JPSS
    Vanessa Griffin / NOAA, Director of the Office of Satellite and Product Operations
    Joe Pica / NOAA National Weather Service, Director of Observations

  • Stunning New Global Portrait Celebrates 20 Years of Studying Life on Earth from Space Live Shots
    2017.11.13
    Stunning New Global Portrait Celebrates 20 Years of Studying Life on Earth from Space
    Show Your Viewers How the Ecosystems in Your Region Are Changing
    NASA Creates the Ultimate Timelapse of Life on Earth

    NASA scientists now have the most complete global picture of life on Earth to date. From the unique vantage point of space, NASA observes not only Earth’s landmasses and oceans but also the organisms that live among them. We see the entire Earth breathing, growing and changing.

    Join NASA scientists from 6:00-11:30 a.m. ET on Friday, Nov. 17, to see a new timelapse of life on our entire planet over the last two decades, in addition to a close-up view of your region. We’ll show your viewers how NASA data is being used to study the health of ecosystems close to home.

    A true understanding of our planet requires us to keep a keen eye on its living inhabitants. With NASA's fleet of Earth-observing satellites, scientists can track worldwide changes in vegetation, marine life, human development and more. We’ve seen fisheries evolving, deserts expanding, spring coming earlier and fall coming later. Seeing these kinds of changes occur all over the world has taught us a lot about the ingredients for life and the environmental conditions that can sustain it.

    We only know of one planet that pulses with life. NASA's outlook from space shows us what makes Earth different from the thousands of other planets we’ve discovered so far. And when considering the vastness of unlivable space, Earth seems evermore fragile and beautiful.

    *****To book a window contact***** Micheala Sosby / micheala.m.sosby@nasa.gov / 219-331-5864

    HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K17 Lower: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 17 Slot Lower| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12031.0 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:
    1. This new timelapse shows 20 years of life on Earth. Show us what’s happening here.
    2. What trends has NASA observed over the last two decades of studying life on Earth?
    3. How are the ecosystems in our region changing?
    4. How is Earth helping us search for life on other worlds?
    5. Where can we learn more?

    Extra Questions for Longer Interviews:
    1. What makes this data set of life on Earth so special?
    2. What tools is NASA using to study Earth’s ecosystems from space?
    3. What are some of the surprising uses of this data set?
    4. What do plants tell us about the health of life on Earth?
    5. With this view from space, what have scientists learned about Earth’s carbon cycle?
    6. Why is NASA’s view from space so important for understanding Earth’s oceans?

    Location: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:
    Dr. Ivona Cetinic/NASA Oceanographer
    Dr. Compton Tucker/NASA Earth Scientist Dr. Jeremy Werdell/NASA Oceanographer Dr. Carlos del Castillo/NASA Oceanographer

  • A Hubble Holiday Surprise Hides In Plain Sight Among The Geminid Meteor Shower Live Shots
    2017.12.06
    One of the Best Meteor Showers of the Year Peaks Next Week
    Hubble Scientists Reveal a New Holiday Image and Share Their Favorite Skywatching Tips

    One of the best meteor showers of the year peaks on Dec. 13, and amidst the shooting stars you can see the very cosmic object that sparkles and shines in this year’s Hubble Space Telescope holiday image.

    Spectators of the Geminid meteor shower can expect to see up to 120 meteors per hour shoot across the night sky. These bright streaks of light will appear when tiny remnants from an asteroid named 3200 Phaethon interact with Earth's atmosphere. Most meteor showers are the result of comet remnants, so the Geminids are special because they originate from an asteroid.

    Join Hubble scientists from 6:00-11:30 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, Dec. 13 as as they share their tips and tricks for meteor shower-watching and stargazing this holiday season. They'll also reveal Hubble's festive new image.

    This year Hubble is releasing a special holiday image that features a truly stunning cosmic object. Even though it's tens of thousands of light-years away, it can still be seen from the ground using just a pair of binoculars or a small backyard telescope. It is best viewed under a winter sky, and better yet, during next week’s meteor shower. HD Satellite Coordinates for G17-K18/Lower: Galaxy 17 Ku-band Xp 18 Slot Lower| 91.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12051.0 MHz | Vertical Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded *****To book a window contact: *****
 Michelle Handleman / michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov / 301-286-0918

    Additional Information: Launched in 1990, Hubble has brought stunning imagery and groundbreaking science to the public for 27 years.

    Suggested Questions:
    1. What is a meteor shower and how can we see the one peaking tonight?
    2. Hubble just released a new holiday image of an object that we can also see in our night sky. How can we see this festive cosmic object? (Scientists will reveal the new Hubble holiday image)
    3. December is a great time to look up at the night sky and see lots of other interesting things. What are some other objects that Hubble has seen that we can see, too?
    4. What tips do you have for aspiring backyard astronomers?
    5. Where can we learn more?

    Questions for longer interviews:
    1. Hubble is 27 years old now. How is the telescope doing?
    2. Hubble has been studying the universe for more than 27 years now. How many observations has the telescope actually made?
    3. Hubble has had a long career studying and capturing beautiful images of planets in our solar system as well as distant galaxies. What’s next for the telescope?
    4. Hubble has captured the imagination of the world. How can the public engage with this iconic telescope?

    Location: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:
    Jim Jeletic / Hubble Space Telescope Deputy Project Manager
    Dr. Ken Carpenter / Hubble Space Telescope Project Scientist
    Dr. Amber Straughn / NASA Astrophysicist Dr. Rosa Diaz / Mission Systems Scientist / Space Telescope Science Institute [Interviews in Spanish]

2016 Live Shots

Collection of live shots done in 2016
  • NASA/NOAA 2015 Global Temperature Live Shots
    2016.01.20
    Earth’s 2015 surface temperatures were the warmest since modern record keeping began in 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Globally-averaged temperatures in 2015 shattered the previous mark set in 2014 by 0.23 degrees Fahrenheit (0.13 Celsius). Only once before, in 1998, has the new record been greater than the old record by this much. The 2015 temperatures continue a long-term warming trend, according to analyses by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York (GISTEMP). NOAA scientists concur with the finding that 2015 was the warmest year on record based on separate, independent analyses of the data. Because weather station locations and measurements change over time, there is some uncertainty in the individual values in the GISTEMP index. Taking this into account, NASA analysis estimates 2015 was the warmest year with 94 percent certainty. The planet’s average surface temperature has risen about 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1.0 degree Celsius) since the late-19th century, a change largely driven by increased carbon dioxide and other human-made emissions into the atmosphere. Most of the warming occurred in the past 35 years, with 15 of the 16 warmest years on record occurring since 2001. Last year was the first time the global average temperatures were 1 degree Celsius or more above the 1880-1899 average. To see NASA/NOAA temperature release.
  • "Tracking El Nino" Live Shots Resource Page
    2016.02.23
    El Niño’s fingerprints are already on this winter’s weather forecasts, influencing extreme weather events ranging from tornados to blizzards across the United States and globally. NASA has been following this El Niño since its development, showing its striking impacts from space. NASA scientists discuss how NASA is studying this year’s El Niño, one of the strongest on record. NASA scientists will show your viewers how Earth’s land, ocean and atmosphere are responding to El Niño-driven changes.

    Suggested Questions:

    1. What can you tell us about this year’s El Niño?

    2. What kind of environmental changes are we seeing from El Niño?

    3. Will this year’s El Niño bring a relief to the droughts in California?

    4. Could this year’s El Nino turn into a La Nina, and what would that mean for us?

    5. Where can we learn more? For more information click here. El Niño Observations @NASAEarth @NASA_ES (en Español)

  • 2016 Total Solar Eclipse Live Shots
    2016.03.03

    NASA scientists discuss the March 8/9, 2016 total solar eclipse. A Moment in the Sun’s Atmosphere: NASA’s Science During the March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse Eye Safety During a Total Solar Eclipse More on Twitter @NASASunEarth Share your eclipse pictures

  • Sea Ice Maximum/Operation IceBridge Live Shots
    2016.03.22

    Just three months into 2016 and already global temperatures – particularly in the Arctic – are far warmer than normal. Global temperatures for February were the warmest on record for that month.

    Nowhere is this warming trend felt more than in the Arctic where the unusual wintertime warmth has contributed to record low wintertime sea ice extent. Arctic sea ice keeps the Polar Regions cold and helps regulate global temperatures. The shrinking of sea ice is a key indicator of our planet’s health. NASA is monitoring the health of the Arctic from space and the ground. In the coming days NASA will launch two missions – Operation Ice Bridge and OMG (Oceans Melting Greenland). These airborne and ground campaigns to the Arctic will take measurements of sea ice and glacier thickness.

    Join NASA scientists on Friday, March 25 from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EDT to see new images of this year’s sea ice extent; talk about how the Arctic faired this winter; and find out the latest on NASA missions to the Arctic set to launch in the coming days.

    Suggested Questions:

    1. What do the latest images show us about this year’s winter in the Arctic?

    2. What do the images tell us about the long-term trend?

    3. NASA is getting ready to send out teams of scientists to the Arctic in the coming days. What will they be doing?

    4. Where can we learn more?

    *** To book a window contact*** Michelle Handleman / michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov Click for sea ice Flickr gallery.

  • Mercury Transit Live Shots May 9, 2016
    2016.05.02

    NASA will broadcast a stunning view of Mercury on May 9, 2016 as it journeys across the sun. The event, known as a transit, occurs when Mercury passes directly between Earth and the sun. This rare phenomenon will cause Mercury to look like a black dot gliding across the sun’s face. Mercury’s last transit was in 2006, and it won’t happen again until 2019!

    Starting at 7:12 a.m. EDT, Mercury will spend more than seven hours travelling across the sun. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory will take the first near real time, ultra-high definition images ever for this event. This is also an opportunity for NASA scientists to fine tune the spacecraft’s cameras, using a method that can only be done during a transit.

    NASA scientists are available Monday, May 9, 2016, from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EDT to show your viewers amazing images of this event as it unfolds. Scientists will also share why transits are important, and how they’re being used to learn more about planets in our solar system—and beyond.

    Scientists have been using transits for hundreds of years to study the planets in our solar system. When a planet crosses in front of the sun, it causes the sun’s brightness to dim. Scientists can measure similar brightness dips from other stars to find planets orbiting them, and can calculate their sizes, how far away the planets are from their stars, and even get hints of what they’re made of. Upcoming NASA missions will watch for transits outside our solar system in order to find new planets, including some that could resemble Earth.

  • New Hubble Image Of Mars Live Shots. Great Viewing Opportunity Of The Red Planet In Late May
    2016.05.13
    Best Viewing Opportunity Of The Red Planet in Two Years

    Mars Makes Major Comeback in Night Sky During Alignment With Earth

    NASA To Release New Hubble Space Telescope Image of Mars

    The night sky in late May will have a very special feature this year. That’s because Mars will shine bigger and brighter than any other time in the past two years as the Red Planet approaches the closest point in its orbit to Earth. No fancy telescopes are needed. You’ll be able to spot the Red Planet with the naked eye.

    Mars and Earth travel at different speeds in their elliptical orbits around the sun. While they line up every 26 months, this will be Mars’ closest orbit to Earth since 2005!

    The Hubble Space Telescope will take advantage of this great viewing opportunity and turn its gaze toward Mars to capture a new, detailed snapshot of the Red Planet.

    NASA scientists are available on Friday, May 20th from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EDT to show your viewers Hubble’s newest image of Mars, tell you how you can spot Mars next weekend and show you some of Hubble’s other images of planets, moons, and fascinating objects in our solar system.

    For 26 years, Hubble has taken stunning pictures of the planets right here in our solar system, in addition to its more than a million observations of far away galaxies and nebulae. These views of the planets in our solar system have provided scientists with a treasure trove of data about Earth’s closest neighbors.

    ****To book a window*** Contact: Michelle Handleman/ michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov/ 301-286-0918 work

    HD Satellite Coordinates for AMC9-K17: AMC-9 Ku-band Xp 17 Slot AB| 83.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12045.8 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:

    1. Scientists are saying the next few days will be one of the best time to go out and view Mars in years. How can we see Mars next weekend?

    2. The Hubble Space Telescope also took advantage of this unique opportunity to image Mars. Can you show us the new image?

    3. When you think of Hubble you often think of far away galaxies, but Hubble has captured great images of planets right here in our own solar system. What have you learned about our solar system?

    4. What’s next for the Hubble Space Telescope?

    5. Where can we see more of Hubble’s images of planets and galaxies?

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:

    Dr. Jennifer Wiseman / Senior Hubble Scientist

    —or—

    Dr. Padi Boyd/ NASA Scientist

    —or—

    Dr. Michelle Thaller / NASA Scientist —or—

    Dr. Susana Deustua / Associate Scientist/ Space Telescope Science Institute Click to learn more about Hubble and see Hubble images. Or on Twitter @NASA_Hubble

  • NASA Releases Global Temperatures for First Half Of 2016
    2016.07.18

    The last two years broke former global temperature records, so all eyes are on 2016. Compared to the 135-year-old modern temperature record – the first five months of 2016 were the warmest ever measured for each respective month.

    On Tuesday July 19, NASA released its updated global temperature analysis for 2016. The data provides strong insights regarding long-term climate change.

    With striking evidence of long-term climate change, NASA scientists are conducting major field research campaigns – flying over melting Arctic sea ice and taking measurements on the ground – to better understand the processes behind and impacts of a warming planet. Our planet is changing, and NASA is on it.

    *** To Book a Window *** Contact Clare Skelly – clare.a.skelly@nasa.gov / (301) 286-4994

    Suggested questions:

    1. NASA just released new temperature data, what can you tell us about the first half of 2016?

    2. What are the impacts of this heat?

    3. So NASA scientists are in the Arctic right now, how are they observing these changes?

    4. How does this science help us plan for the future?

    5. Where can we learn more? Click for MEDIA RELEASE Click for Arctic sea ice latest. Click for more NASA Earth Science. More on Twitter #EarthRightNow

  • New Hubble "Frontier Field" Image Live Shots
    2016.07.15

    For 26 years the Hubble Space Telescope’s continuing mission has captured the attention of the world with its awe-inspiring images of strange new worlds and exotic galaxies across our universe.

    Just as Captain Kirk and the crew of the Starship Enterprise have stretched our imagination for the last 50 years, for a quarter century Hubble has turned science fiction into science fact.

    Join NASA scientists on Friday, July 22 from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EDT to see some of the earliest galaxies with one of Hubble’s deepest views yet of the universe. There are thousands of galaxies in this image, each teeming with billions of stars, home to strange distant worlds.

    Hubble’s Frontier Fields program uses the power of massive galaxy clusters deep in space. The gravity of these clusters is so massive that it distorts and magnifies the light around it, allowing us to see the very faint light of the distant galaxies behind it.

    **** To book a window contact **** Michelle Handleman / michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov / 301-286-0918

    HD Satellite Coordinates for AMC9-K23: AMC-9 Ku-band Xp 23 Slot AB| 83.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12151 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:

    For more than a quarter century, Hubble has inspired generations of people around the world with its views of the universe. Can you show us the new "Frontier Field" image?

    So this image is literally taking us back to the very edge of space and time. How is this image helping us explore the final frontier?

    Star Trek has stretched our imagination for 50 years. The Starship Enterprise (and its successors) explored hundreds of strange new worlds. How does Hubble compare in seeking out life and new civilizations?

    Star Trek helped us imagine many wonders out there in the Final Frontier. What are some of the wildest things Hubble has seen?

    Where can we learn more?

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:

    Dr. Padi Boyd / NASA Scientist

    Dr. Ken Carpenter / NASA Scientist

    Dr. Jennifer Lotz / Associate Astronomer / Space Telescope Science Institute

    Dr. Rosa Diaz / Mission Systems Scientist / Space Telescope Science Institute [Interviews in Spanish]

    Video: NASA will roll all insert videos during live interviews. If needed, stations can roll a clean feed of all video at 5:45 a.m. EDT on July 22, 2016, at the above listed satellite.

  • Wildfires Live Shot July 2016
    2016.07.25

    NASA Tracking Global Wildfires as Summer Heats Up

    El Nino Fueling Hotter, Drier Conditions in Western U.S. and the Amazon, Priming Them for Flames

    This year’s wildfire season is off to a blazing start. Firefighters in California are battling flames right now north of Los Angeles. Earlier this summer record-breaking temperatures set parts of Alaska and the Southwest on fire. More than 29,000 wildfires have burned over 2.6 million acres in the U.S. this year. The southern Amazon is also expected to see a significant increase in wildfire activity this summer, as El Niño has left the rainforest its driest in 14 years. Smoke from these fires could affect wildlife and agriculture, and potentially impact major events like the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    NASA scientists will be available on Friday, July 29 from 6 a.m.-11:30 a.m. EDT to show viewers how NASA is tracking wildfires, and how they’re affecting your viewers. We will also have a Spanish and Portuguese-speaking scientist available.

    The expected wildfire surge in the Amazon this summer is the result of El Nino, a warming of waters in the Pacific Ocean that had major impacts on weather across the United States the first half of 2016. While El Nino has officially ended, we’re still feeling effects through increased wildfire activity.

    In some parts of the U.S., the fire season is now on average 78 days longer than it was in 1970, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. NASA scientists are able to monitor these wildfires better than ever before, providing valuable information that fire managers can use to prepare the public. NASA is also launching field campaigns this summer to learn more about fires and their global impacts.

    ****To book a window***

    Contact: Michelle Handleman/michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov

    Claire Saravia/ claire.g.desaravia@nasa.gov@nasa.gov

    HD Satellite Coordinates for AMC9-K23: AMC-9 Ku-band Xp 23 Slot AB| 83.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12151.0 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:

    1. Wildfires have been raging in parts of the US this year. Can you show us the view from space?

    2. It’s been an active year around the globe for wildfires. How do fires on the other side of the world affect us?

    3. El Nino has dried out the Amazon this year, making it vulnerable to wildfires. What impacts could this have on the Summer Olympics?

    4. NASA is doing groundbreaking research around the world to study wildfires. What are we learning?

    5. Where can we learn more?

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:

    Dr. Doug Morton / NASA Scientist (English and Portuguese)

    Dr. Lesley Ott / NASA Scientist

    Dr. Robert Field / NASA Scientist

    Dr. Eric Brown De Colstoun / NASA Scientist (en Español)

    Click for NASA's FIRES webpage.

    Find the latest on Twitter @NASAEarth

  • 2016 Sea Ice Minimum Live Shots
    2016.08.15

    Arctic Sea Ice Trending Low After Record 2016 Heat

    NASA Scientists Available August 19 To Show New Views Of The Arctic During Summer Melt Season

    Record-breaking temperatures in the first half of 2016 have primed the Arctic for another summer of low sea ice cover. Sea ice is frozen ocean water around the polar caps that, in the winter thickens and grows and in the summer thins and decreases. Arctic sea ice is important because it reflects sunlight and keeps the Arctic region cool. Over the past three decades, Arctic sea ice has dramatically declined; making what was once extraordinary low measurements the new normal.

    Join NASA scientists on Friday August 19th from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EDT to show your viewers new images from the Arctic, and talk about how the polar region is fairing this summer, and how long-term changes in this region could affect the way we live in the U.S.

    The Arctic is Earth’s air conditioner and it helps regulate global temperatures. But the region is warming twice as fast as elsewhere in the world, making the Arctic one of the most visible signs of a changing planet.

    NASA is keeping a close eye on changing conditions in the Arctic with its satellites, airborne and ground campaigns that are measuring the polar sea ice. Scientists are also monitoring the ice sheets that sit on land that are also melting at increasing rates. In 2018 NASA will launch the ICESat-2 satellite that will make some of the most advanced measurements of the polar regions ever.

    ** To book a window ** Michelle Handleman/ michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov / 301-286-0918 work

    HD Satellite Coordinates for AMC9-K17/Slot AB (18MHz): AMC-9 Ku-band Xp 17 Slot AB| 83.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12045.0 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:

    1. Globally it’s been the warmest year on record. What do the latest images show us about this year’s summer in the Arctic?

    2. What is sea ice and why is it important to the Arctic and the Earth as a whole?

    3. Do you think we’ll ever see an ice-free Arctic?

    4. What about the rest of the Arctic – aren’t we seeing changes in Greenland, too?

    5. Where can we learn more?

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:

    • Dr. Walt Meier / NASA Scientist


    • Dr. Tom Wagner / NASA Cryosphere Program Manager

    • Dr. Carlos Del Castillo / NASA Scientist [Interviews in Spanish]

    Video: NASA will roll all insert videos during live interviews. If needed, stations can roll a clean feed of all video at 5:45 a.m. EDT on August 18, 2016, at the above listed satellite.

    Canned interviews and b-roll will be available starting August 18 at 6:00 p.m. EDT: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12335 On Twitter @NASAEarth

  • OSIRIS-REx Live Shots
    2016.09.06

    NASA scientists are available on Thursday, Sept. 8th from 6:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. and again 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. EDT – just hours before NASA’s FIRST-EVER asteroid sample return mission launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida – to find out why NASA is going to this asteroid, and what mysteries it might unlock about how life started on Earth and whether life could have started elsewhere in our solar system. We also have a Spanish-speaking scientist available. On Thursday September 8th at 7:05 p.m. EDT, NASA will launch the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer – or OSIRIS-REx – spacecraft that will travel to a near-Earth asteroid named Bennu. Asteroids are rocky debris left over from the dawn of our solar system 4.5 billion years ago. They’ve changed little over time, making Bennu a pristine time capsule of the building blocks of our solar system. Crews in the local Washington/Baltimore area are invited out to Goddard Space Flight Center for a launch viewing event + availability for interviews with scientists Sept 8th from 4:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. EDT at the Visitors Center. RSVP information is here.

    To book a window – contact: Michelle Handleman at michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov. HD Satellite Coordinates for AMC9-K23AB: AMC-9 Ku-band Xp 23 Slot AB| 83.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12151.0 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:

    1. Later today NASA will launch its first-ever sample return mission to an asteroid. Tell us more about this mission.

    2. Could asteroids contain the chemical precursors for life on Earth and in the solar system?

    3. You have a really interesting way to “kiss the asteroid” to collect a sample. Can you show us how you’re going do that?

    4. What will scientists do with the sample once it returns to Earth?

    5. Where can we learn more?

    Live Shot Details:

    Locations:

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station/ Cape Canaveral, Florida (from 6am-9am and 4pm-6pm)

    NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland (from 9am-2pm)

    Scientists:

    Dr. Jim Green / Director, NASA Planetary Science Division

    Dr. Ellen Stofan / NASA Chief Scientist

    Dr. Jim Garvin / NASA Goddard Chief Scientist

    Dr. Lucy McFadden / NASA Scientist

    Dr. Geronimo Villanueva/ NASA Scientist [Interviews in Spanish]

  • Hurricane Matthew Live Shots
    2016.10.06

    Residents along the East Coast are bracing for heavy rains and flooding as Hurricane Matthew barrels toward the U.S. Matthew is the most powerful hurricane to form over the Atlantic since Hurricane Felix in 2007 as it reached Category 5 strength on Oct. 1. NASA is tracking this storm with its powerful arsenal of satellites.

    NASA scientists are available on Friday, Oct. 7 from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EDT to take your viewers inside and outside of Hurricane Matthew with new images of the storm. Find out how NASA is helping to uncover the mysteries of how these storms develop and intensify. Using NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission’s international network of satellites, scientists can observe hurricanes from their birthplace; watch as they travel across the Atlantic Ocean; and see where it really counts – landfall. Scientists can observe a storm’s progress and see what is happening INSIDE the system where a slight change dictates whether a storm will make history or fizzle out.

    ** This interview will focus on the science behind this hurricane and hurricane research. Questions about the latest forecast should be directed to NOAA's National Hurricane Center at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov."***<.b>

    **** To Book a Window *** Contact Michelle Handleman – michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov / (301) 286-0918 office

    HD Satellite Coordinates for AMC9-K11 AB: AMC-9 Ku-band Xp 11 Slot AB| 83.0 ° W Longitude | DL 11911.0 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested questions:

    1. Hurricane Matthew is the strongest hurricane to develop in the Atlantic in almost 10 years. How are scientists using satellites to look inside of Matthew?

    2. This has been a slow moving, but rapidly intensifying storm. How can images like this give us clues as to when a storm is about to intensify?

    3. Matthew produced torrential rains in the Caribbean and could produce significant rains along in coastal states in the U.S. Can we see how this rainfall is accumulating from space?

    4. What is the future of how NASA will monitor hurricanes?

    5. Where can we learn more?

    Live shot details:

    Location: Goddard Space Flight Center/ Greenbelt, MD Scientists:

    Dr. Dalia Kirschbaum/ NASA Scientist

    Dr. Scott Braun/ NASA Scientist

    Dr. Owen Kelley / NASA Scientist

  • NASA's STEREO Solar Probes 10th Anniversary Live Shots
    2016.10.17

    NASA Solar Probes Celebrate 10 Years of Uncovering Mysteries of Space Weather

    STEREO Mission Gave First Ever 360-Degree Views of Our Star, Origin of Solar Wind

    Ten years ago on Oct. 25, 2006, NASA launched twin satellites into orbit to get the first 360-degree view of the sun at one time. The Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO) spacecraft have helped NASA scientists to better understand how the sun affects Earth and the solar system, including the harsh space environment that spacecraft – or even astronauts – may experience in space.

    Join NASA scientists on Friday, Oct. 21, from 6:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. EDT to show your viewers revolutionary solar images from this mission that has uncovered some of the mysteries surrounding the origin of space weather.

    With STEREO-A ahead of Earth in its orbit and STEREO-B trailing behind, the observatories have captured 3D views of the sun’s regular violent eruptions of matter, which trigger the aurora and can – at their worst – disrupt satellites and even cause electrical power outages. STEREO has served as a key addition to a fleet of space weather detection satellites by providing unique data to better help us understand what sets off such solar eruptions and how they travel toward Earth.

    STEREO is also laying the groundwork for Solar Probe Plus, the first mission that will fly into the upper solar atmosphere and “touch” the sun. Launching in 2018, NASA’s Solar Probe Plus will continue the work of improving scientists’ understanding of space weather and its impact on the solar system by observing the sun from a closer vantage point than any human-made object in history.

    To book a window, contact Michelle Handleman / michelle.z.handleman@nasa.gov / 301-286-0918

    tHD Satellite Digital Coordinates: HD Satellite Coordinates for AMC9- K11AB: AMC-9 Ku-band Xp 11 Slot AB| 83.0 ° W Longitude | DL 11911.0 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded

    Suggested Questions:

    1. Why does space weather matter to us on Earth?

    2. How has STEREO changed our understanding of the sun?

    3. We’re gearing up for the solar event of the century in the U.S.— the August 2017 solar eclipse. How does an eclipse help us understand the sun?

    4. NASA has an upcoming mission that will for the first time touch the sun. Can you tell us about that?

    5. We heard STEREO-B was giving NASA the silent treatment for a while. Can you tell us what happened?

    6. Where can we learn more?

    Live Shot Details:

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Greenbelt, Maryland

    Scientists:

    Dr. Yari Collado-Vega/ NASA Scientists [Interviews in English and Spanish]

    Dr. Eric Christian/ NASA Scientist

    Video: NASA will roll all insert videos during live interviews. If needed, stations can roll a clean feed of all video at 5:45 a.m. EDT on Oct. 21st at the above-listed satellite.

  • Record Supermoon Live Shots (Nov. 11, 2016)
    2016.11.02
    Showstopper Nov. 14 Supermoon is the Closest Moon to Earth since 1948
    Bigger and Brighter, the Moon will Dazzle in the Night Sky all Weekend
    The moon is a familiar sight, but the days leading up to Monday, Nov. 14, promise a spectacular supermoon show. When a full moon makes its closest pass to Earth in its orbit it appears up to 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter, making it a supermoon. This month’s is especially ‘super’ for two reasons: it is the only supermoon this year to be completely full, and it is the closest moon to Earth since 1948 – when a gallon of gas cost just 16 cents. The moon won’t be this super again until 2034!
    Join NASA scientists on Monday, Nov. 11, from 6:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. EST to tell your viewers when they can see the supermoon, what’s so special about this one and how studying our nearest neighbor helps us uncover mysteries of the outer solar system.
    The moon is the Rosetta Stone by which we understand the rest of the solar system. NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter – or LRO – has been mapping the moon’s surface and capturing high-resolution images for more than seven years. New observations from LRO show a surprising number of small meteoroids are transforming the moon’s surface much faster than previously thought. Extensive mapping of the moon aids scientists in understanding our planet’s history as well as planetary objects beyond the Earth-moon system.
    *** To Book a Window *** Contact Clare Skelly – clare.a.skelly@nasa.gov / 301-286-4994 (office) / 301-509-5414 (cell)
    HD Satellite Digital Coordinates:AMC-9 Ku-band Xp 23 Slot AB| 83.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12151.0 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded
    Suggested Questions:
    1. What is a supermoon and what makes this one so super?
    2. When is the best time to see the supermoon and will it look different from other full moons?
    3. Many of our viewers will be amazed to hear that NASA has had a spacecraft orbiting the moon for over seven years. What is the most surprising thing you’ve seen?
    4. What can our moon teach us about other mysterious places deeper in the solar system?
    5. Where can we learn more?

    Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Greenbelt, Maryland
    Scientists: Dr. Noah Petro / NASA Scientist
    —or—
    Dr. Alex Young / NASA Scientist
    —or—
    Nayessda Castro / NASA Engineer & LRO Mission Operations Team Member [en Español]

2015 Live Shots

Collection of live shots done in 2015
  • 2014 Global Temperature Announcement Live Shot Page
    2015.01.16
    The year 2014 ranks as Earth’s warmest since 1880, according to two analyses released on Jan. 16. NASA scientists discussed the findings during live shot interviews on Jan. 16th. NASA scientists track global temperatures as one way to measure how Earth’s climate is changing over time. Since 1880, the average global temperature has risen about 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit with most of that trend occurring in the last 30 years. Nine of the 10 warmest years in the modern record have occurred since 2000.
  • Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Live Shot Page 1.29.15
    2015.01.28
    NASA scientists talk about the launch of the Soil Moisture Active Passive - or SMAP - satellite scheduled to launch on Jan 29. SMAP will take stock of the water hidden just beneath your feet, in the topsoil. Knowing how much water is in the soil, and whether it is frozen or thawed, has profound applications for society, from better forecasting of natural disasters like floods and droughts to helping prevent food shortages. How SMAP's radiometer works. To learn how SMAP will help weather forecasts click here. To learn more about SMAP click here. For NASA TV's video file click here.
  • MMS Pre-launch Live Shots
    2015.03.12
    LIVE Satellite Interviews with NASA Scientist Thrusday, March 12 from 6 am. - 11 am. EDT
    Join us just hours before these four identical MMS spacecraft launch from Florida’s Cape Canaveral – to talk about what scientists hope to learn from this first-of-its-kind magnetic storm chasing mission, and why understanding this phenomenon in Earth’s backyard is game changing.

    Live Shot Details:
    Location: Goddard Space Flight Center/ Greenbelt, MD
    Scientists: Dr. Holly Gilbert / NASA Scientist
    Dr. Michelle Thaller / NASA Scientist
    Dr. Diego Janches / NASA Scientist (interviews in Spanish)

    *** HD Satellite Coordinates ***: AMC-16 Ku-band Xp 24 Slot A18 | 85.0 ° W Longitude | DL 12171 MHz | Horizontal Polarity | QPSK/DVB-S | FEC 3/4 | SR 13.235 Mbps | DR 18.2954 MHz | HD 720p | Format MPEG2 | Chroma Level 4:2:0 | Audio Embedded
  • GPM April Showers Bring May Flowers Live Shots 4.1.15
    2015.03.31
    NASA scientists talk about the new global portrait of rain and snow and why this world-wide view of precipitation is important for everything from knowing how much freshwater is available to drink, to forecasting natural disasters like hurricanes and floods, to understanding Earth in a changing climate. NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement mission – GPM – sees through clouds to produce the most detailed world-wide view of rain, light rain and snow every 30 minutes. Scientists can now see weather fronts in the Southern Ocean, snow at the tops of hurricanes and watch a storm on the East Coast travel across the Atlantic bringing deluge of rain that causes flooding in England. A constellation of a dozen satellites provides this unprecidented look inside rain clouds, hurricanes and blizzards, giving scientists new insights into how these storms develop and intensify, which will improve weather forecasting. For "A week in the life of rain" click here.
  • Hubble's 25th Anniversary Resource B-Roll Collection
    2015.04.20
    Collection includes highlight reels from the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope on April 24, 1990, deployment and various b-roll of the servicing missions.
  • A Tale Of Two Extremes Live Shots
    2015.07.31
    It’s been a tale of two extremes this year for the United States. Severe drought plagues the West Coast, causing states like California to take serious measures for water conservation. Then just last week Southern California got a deluge of rain that caused flooding. In Texas, heavy rains and flash flooding this summer seem to have erased drought memories—for now. New views from NASA satellites delve into the details of where the water is, or not, from the dry west to the soggy east, and why. NASA scientists Ben Cook and Doug Morton are available on Friday, July 31 between 6 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. EDT to show your viewers new views of the extreme drought and flood conditions affecting large swaths of the U.S., and discuss if a strong possible El Niño will play a role. Click here for more about information about California's rainfall deficit. For more Earth Science stories click here.
  • Sea Level Rise Live Shots
    2015.08.26
    Earth’s rising seas are some of most visible signs of our warming planet. Over the last 20 years, NASA satellites, airborne missions and field campaigns show a steady rise in global sea levels as the world’s polar ice sheets melt. As the Earth continues to warm, new research suggests sea levels could rise by as much as several feet in the next 100 years. Sea level rise is one of the biggest environmental challenges of the 21st Century, and NASA research is helping us understand how much our oceans will rise, and how fast that will happen. Hear from NASA scientists about the latest research on rising sea levels and melting polar ice. See surprising new views of ice loss in Greenland and Antarctica, and talk about the consequences of our rising oceans. Sea Level Rise Gallery. Material from Aug. 26th teleconference is here.
  • Supermoon Eclipse 2015 Live Shots Interviews And B-roll
    2015.09.15
    Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Deputy Project Scientist Noah Petro discusses the Sept. 27th supermoon eclipse and some of the cool things that scientists have learned about our moon. NASA will provide a LIVE FEED of Sunday's Supermoon eclipse. Click for details.
  • MAVEN Results Live Shot Page
    2015.11.05
    On Thursday, November 5, 2015, NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) has released its first results showing how Mars is losing its atmosphere to space. These results will help scientists understand why Mars' climate has changed, and why the planet has evolved from being warm and wet to cold and dry. Scientists were available Friday, November 6 to discuss these results, and what we can learn from them.
  • Carbon Cycle Live Shots
    2015.11.19
    Carbon dioxide is vital for life on Earth, but an overload of the greenhouse gas is driving one of the most serious problems facing our planet: climate change. With NASA’s fleet of satellites including NASA’s new experimental Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), scientists now have a more complete picture of how Earth is changing as carbon dioxide levels rise. Join NASA scientists on Friday, Nov. 20th from 6:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EST and again from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST to see NASA’s first-ever global view tracking carbon dioxide levels all the way from the top of the atmosphere to Earth’s surface. Find out how these results are helping us understand how humans are changing the climate, and what it means for our future. Rising levels of carbon dioxide, which acts as a blanket trapping heat in our atmosphere, are already causing major changes to our climate -- from rising sea levels to the fact that 10 of the warmest years on record happened in the last 15 years. For more information see: "A Breathing Planet, Off Balance." Additional videos of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite.
  • Hubble Sees A Cosmic "Lightsaber" Live Shots
    2015.12.17
    Far, far away in our own galaxy, cosmic forces are awakening in a newborn star seen by the Hubble Space Telescope. On Friday, Dec. 18th, scientists will show you a new image of a newborn star right here in our Milky Way galaxy, shooting jets into space that resemble a cosmic “lightsaber.”

    Since Hubble’s launch in 1990, Hubble has given humankind an unobstructed view of the universe that has rewritten the textbooks and profoundly transformed our understanding of the cosmos and our place among the stars. Hubble has given us a closer look at galaxies far, far away, and the planets and moons right here in our solar system. This is helping NASA in its quest to understand the solar system and beyond. Hubble continues to generate powerful images that show us the real ‘star wars,’ turning science fiction into science fact. Hubble Sees the Force Awakening in a Newborn Star. Click to download the new "lightsaber" image. Extended Hubble resource collection with additional videos, interviews, animations and packages

2014 Live Shots

Collection of live shots done in 2014

2013 Live Shots

Collection of live shots done in 2013

2012 Live Shots

Collection of live shots done in 2012
  • Landsat 40th Liveshot Roll-in Video
    2012.07.18
    On Friday, July 20th, in advance of Landsat's 40th birthday and a live NASA press conference on Monday the 23rd, NASA scientists are available to discuss amazing & unprecedented images from space of your region. Cities grow, wildfires rage, rivers flood out of their beds and droughts shrink lakes and reservoirs — all captured by Landsat, the world's longest continuous record of Earth from space.

    Since 1972, Landsat satellites have been orbiting Earth, telling the story of soil moisture, urban spread, land use, assist disasters & recovery. Next year, the 8th Landsat satellite (LDCM) will be launched from California. The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) will track food production and water resources, organize disaster recovery and monitor the impact of climate change.

    The following is broadcast quality video roll-ins in Apple ProRes 422, 1280x720, 59.94 fps.