Sun  ID: 12500

SDO: Year 7

Our sun is ever-changing, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory has a front-row seat.

On Feb. 11, 2010, NASA launched the Solar Dynamics Observatory, also known as SDO. SDO keeps a constant eye on the sun, helping us track everything from sunspots to solar flares to other types of space weather that can have an impact on Earth. For instance, solar activity is behind the aurora, one of Earth’s most dazzling natural events.

The sun’s activity rises and falls in a pattern that lasts about 11 years on average. This is called the solar cycle. After seven years in space, SDO has had a chance to do what few other satellites have been able to do – watch the sun for the majority of a solar cycle in 11 types of light. This video shows two.
 

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Credits

Scott Wiessinger (USRA): Lead Producer
Aaron E. Lepsch (ADNET Systems Inc.): Technical Support
Tom Bridgman (GST): Data Visualizer
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO

Short URL to share this page:
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12500

Mission:
SDO

Data Used:
SDO/HMI/Continuum
SDO/AIA/171 Filter
Note: While we identify the data sets used in these visualizations, we do not store any further details nor the data sets themselves on our site.

This item is part of these series:
Narrated Movies
SDO - Edited Features

Keywords:
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Music
SVS >> Solar Cycle
SVS >> Sun
GCMD >> Earth Science >> Sun-earth Interactions >> Solar Activity >> Sunspots
SVS >> SDO
SVS >> Edited Feature
SVS >> Solar Dynamics Observatory
SVS >> Heliophysics
SVS >> Sunspot Cycle
SVS >> Corona
NASA Science >> Sun

GCMD keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation: Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0