STEREO

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STEREO for HDTV (non-stereo)

High-Definition movies of actual STEREO data.
  • STEREO Coronal Mass Ejection: From the EUVI to HI-2
    2007.03.01
    This movie collects imagery from SOHO and STEREO-A of a coronal mass ejection (CME) during January of 2007. The instruments in this view, from left to right, are STEREO/HI-1, STEREO/HI-2, SOHO/LASCO/C3, SOHO/LASCO/C2, and STEREO/EUVI. The Heliospheric Imager, HI-2, shows some of the tail of comet McNaught. The dark trapezoidal shape on the left edge of the image in HI-2 is the Earth occulter which will block out the disk of the Earth when it moves into view (since the planet will appear so bright as to saturate the detectors). Due to ongoing work with the STEREO coronagraphs, COR1 and COR2, the SOHO/LASCO coronagraphs are used for this movie. The blue Sun in the center of the coronagraphs is STEREO/EUVI ultraviolet images.

    There is a 22 hour gap in the data coverage for HI-2 which creates the appearance of a jump in the playback.

    These are not standard images but are called 'running difference' images which highlight changes in the view. White pixels correspond to increases in brightness, while dark pixels reflect a decrease in brightness, with respect to the immediately previous image.

    'Running differencing' generates some unusual effects. For example, the mottled background is created by the motion of the stars through the field-of-view as the spacecraft pointing direction slowly changes (the Andromeda galaxy is the oblong 'smudge' near the upper left corner). The planets Venus (right edge of HI-2) and Mercury are visible (near center of HI-1), their column of pixels saturated due to their brightness.

    - STEREO: Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory
    - SOHO: SOlar Heliospheric Observatory
    - LASCO: Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph
    - EUVI: Extreme UltraViolet Imager

  • STEREO Panoramic View
    2007.03.01
    The STEREO mission presents a new view of the space between the Earth and the Sun. This view from the STEREO-A satellite, demonstrates the broad range of sky coverage by the five cameras of the SECCHI instrument.
  • STEREO-A Extreme Ultraviolet Imager. First Light
    2007.03.01
    At a pixel resolution of 2048x2048, the STEREO EUVI instrument provides views of the Sun in ultraviolet light that rivals the full-disk views of SOHO/EIT. This image is through the 171 Ångström (ultraviolet) filter which is characteristic of iron ions (missing eight and nine electrons) at 1 million degrees. There is a short data gap in the latter half of the movie that creates a freeze and then jump in the data view.

    - STEREO: Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory
    - SOHO: SOlar Heliospheric Observatory
    - EIT: Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope
    - EUVI: Extreme UltraViolet Imager

Collections by Mission Events

Supplemental Resources

Spacecraft Views

Data-Based Solar Models: 2-D & 3-D

  • Flight Through the Loops
    2005.10.27
    Here we illustrate the potential benefits of the 3-D views of the Sun which STEREO will provide. Starting with a simple 2-D EIT ultraviolet image from SOHO, we transition to a 3-D model and move through the coronal loops which are constructed along solar magnetic fields. The solar model is constructed from magnetogram data collected by SOHO/MDI. Because we do not see the full solar surface at any one time, the magnetograms collected over the course of a solar rotation are processed through a time-evolving solar surface model to provide a snapshot of the surface at a fixed time. The resulting magnetogram is then processed through the Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model. Coronal loops are visible at the higher temperatures of ultraviolet light, in this case, 195 Ångströms, the filter wavelength of SOHO/EIT. For this version, we color the coronal loops green for ready comparison to the EIT 195 Ångström imagery using the EIT 'standard color table'.
  • Rotating tour of the Coronal loops
    2005.10.27
    A slow rotating tour of a data-based coronal loop model. This version is designed for continuous loop play. The solar model is constructed from magnetogram data collected by SOHO/MDI. Because we do not see the full solar surface at any one time, the magnetograms collected over the course of a solar rotation are processed through a time-evolving solar surface model to provide a snapshot of the surface at a fixed time. The resulting magnetogram is then processed through the Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model. Coronal loops are visible at the higher temperatures of ultraviolet light, in this case, 195 Ångströms, the filter wavelength of SOHO/EIT.
  • Grand Tour of the Coronal Loops
    2006.03.30
    This is a longer coronal loops tour combining components of the two previous versions (#3286 and #3287). The solar model is constructed from magnetogram data collected by SOHO/MDI. Because we do not see the full solar surface at any one time, the magnetograms collected over the course of a solar rotation are processed through a time-evolving solar surface model which provides a snapshot of the surface at a fixed time. The resulting magnetogram is then processed through the Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model which constructs the magnetic field above the solar surface. The magnetic field around the Sun is then analyzed for field lines, which creates the loop structures we see in the model. Hot plasma tends to flow along the magnetic field lines, creating the coronal loops. These loops are only visible at the higher temperatures corresponding to ultraviolet light, in this case, 195 Ångströms, one of the filter wavelengths of SOHO/EIT. For this version, we color the coronal loops green for ready comparison to the EIT 195 Ångström imagery using the EIT standard color table.
  • Constructing 3-D CMEs from 2-D Data
    2004.07.01
    Using differences in polarization of light directly from the Sun vs. scattered from the CME electrons, it is possible to derive a distance of matter along the line-of-sight. This version is an enhanced version of animation ID 2950 with a color table enhanced to show fainter regions of the CME.
  • Model for Coronal Mass Ejections
    2005.04.27
    A coronal mass ejection (CME) is a massive burst of solar wind, other light isotope plasma, and magnetic fields rising above the solar corona or being released into space.