Bermuda High

  • Released Wednesday, June 7, 2006

The Bermuda High pressure system sits over the Atlantic during summer. Acting as a block that hurricanes cannot penetrate, the size and location of this system can determine where hurricanes go. A normal Bermuda High often leads to hurricanes moving up the east coast and out to sea. During summer 2004 and 2005, the Bermuda High expanded to the south and west, which steered hurricanes into the Gulf of Mexico rather than up the east coast or curving out to sea. Once in the Gulf, most hurricane paths will involve landfall at some location.

During summer 2004 and 2005, the Bermuda High expanded to the south and west, which steered hurricanes into the Gulf of Mexico rather than up the east coast or curving out to sea.

During summer 2004 and 2005, the Bermuda High expanded to the south and west, which steered hurricanes into the Gulf of Mexico rather than up the east coast or curving out to sea.



Credits

Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Images Lab

Release date

This page was originally published on Wednesday, June 7, 2006.
This page was last updated on Wednesday, May 3, 2023 at 1:55 PM EDT.


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