Hurricane Danielle's Hot Towers August 27,2010 Stereoscopic Version

  • Released Saturday, October 30th, 2010
  • Updated Wednesday, May 3rd, 2023 at 1:53PM
View full credits

NASA's TRMM spacecraft allows us to look under Hurricane Danielle's clouds to see the rain structure on August 27, 2005 at 06:46 UTC or 2:46 EDT. At this time, Hurricane Danielle was a powerful Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale with sustained winds of 115 knots (132 mph). An area of deep convective towers (shown in red) is prominently visible in the center of the storm. These tall towers are the key to Danielle's intensification. They are associated with the strong thunderstorms responsible for the areas of intense rain. These storms within a storm are releasing vast amounts of heat into the core of Danielle. This heating, known as latent heating, is what is driving the storm's circulation and intensification. This animation shows infrared data from TRMM's Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) sensor above a thinner swath from TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR). TRMM reveals that Danielle now has a well-formed eye surrounded by sharply curved rainbands—all signs of mature storm with an intense circulation. TRMM also reveals that there are very powerful thunderstorms in Danielle's eye wall dropping extreme amounts of rain.

Star background is from the Tycho-2 star catalogue. This is an astrometric and photometric reference catalogue of the 2.5 million brightest stars in the sky.

Star background is from the Tycho-2 star catalogue.

This is an astrometric and photometric reference catalogue of the 2.5 million brightest stars in the sky.



Credits

Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio


Missions

This visualization is related to the following missions:

Series

This visualization can be found in the following series:

Papers used in this visualization

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/topstory/2004/0112towerclouds.html


Datasets used in this visualization

Note: While we identify the data sets used in these visualizations, we do not store any further details, nor the data sets themselves on our site.