Comparison of Minimum Sea Ice between 2005 and 2007 - Full Screen

  • Released Thursday, October 4th, 2007
  • Updated Wednesday, May 3rd, 2023 at 1:55PM
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Sea ice is frozen seawater floating on the surface of the ocean. Some sea ice is semi-permanent, persisting from year to year, and some is seasonal, melting and refreezing from season to season. The 2007 Arctic summer sea ice has reached the lowest extent of perennial ice cover on record - nearly 25% less than the previous low set in 2005. The area of the perennial ice has been steadily decreasing since the satellite record began in 1979, at a rate of about 10% per decade. But the 2007 minimum, reached on September 14, is far below the previous record made in 2005 and is about 38% lower than the climatological average. Such a dramatic loss has implications for ecology, climate and industry.

In this animation, the 2005 sea ice minimum extent is initially shown over the Arctic. As the 2005 minimum sea ice fades to orange, the 2007 minimum extent comes into view. The state of California, shown in green, is placed in the melt region for a comparison of the size difference between the two years..

This image shows a comparison between the minimum sea ice from 2005, shown in orange, and the 2007 mimimum sea ice from September 14, shown in white.  An area the size of California, shown in green, is overlain on the melt region.

This image shows a comparison between the minimum sea ice from 2005, shown in orange, and the 2007 mimimum sea ice from September 14, shown in white. An area the size of California, shown in green, is overlain on the melt region.



Credits

Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio
The Next Generation Blue Marble data is courtesy of Reto Stockli (NASA/GSFC).


Datasets used in this visualization

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