RHESSI Observes 2.2 MeV Line Emission from a Solar Flare

  • Released Tuesday, September 2, 2003

The solar flare at Active Region 10039 on July 23, 2002 exhibits many exceptional high-energy phenomena including the 2.223 MeV neutron capture line and the 511 keV electron-positron (antimatter) annihilation line. In the animation, the RHESSI low-energy channels (12-25 keV) are represented in red and appears predominantly in coronal loops. The high-energy flux appears as blue at the footpoints of the coronal loops. Violet is used to indicate the location and relative intensity of the 2.2MeV emission.

Video slate image says, "RHESS Observes 2.2 MeV Line Emission from a Solar FlareThe solar flare at Active Region AR 10039 on July 23, 2002 exhibits many exceptional high-energy phenomena including the 2.223 MeV neutron capture line and the 511 keV electron-positron (antimatter) annihilation line. In the animation, the RHESSI low-energy channels (12-25 keV) are represented in red and appears predominantly in coronal loops. The high-energy flux appears as blue at the footpoints of the coronal loops. Violet is used to indicate the location and relative intensity of the 2.2MeV emission."

Video slate image says, "RHESS Observes 2.2 MeV Line Emission from a Solar Flare

The solar flare at Active Region AR 10039 on July 23, 2002 exhibits many exceptional high-energy phenomena including the 2.223 MeV neutron capture line and the 511 keV electron-positron (antimatter) annihilation line. In the animation, the RHESSI low-energy channels (12-25 keV) are represented in red and appears predominantly in coronal loops. The high-energy flux appears as blue at the footpoints of the coronal loops. Violet is used to indicate the location and relative intensity of the 2.2MeV emission."



Credits

Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

Release date

This page was originally published on Tuesday, September 2, 2003.
This page was last updated on Wednesday, May 3, 2023 at 1:57 PM EDT.


Missions

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Series

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Datasets used in this visualization

  • SOHO/MDI [SOHO: Michelson Doppler Interferometer (MDI)]

    ID: 96
    Sensor: Michelson Doppler Interferometer (MDI)Dates used: 2002/07/21T23:59:30-2002/07/23T17:35:30
  • [RHESSI: X-ray Imaging Spectrometer]

    ID: 101
    Sensor: X-ray Imaging SpectrometerDates used: 2002/07/23T00:16:00-2002/07/23T01:14:53

    The RHESSI instrument is an imaging spectrometer observing the Sun at X-ray to gamma-rays (photon energies of 3 keV to 17 MeV) at time resolutions of a few seconds. (eV stands for "electron volt" and is a unit of energy. Note that photons of visible light have energies of 2-3 eV. 1 keV is a thousand electron volts and 1 MeV is a million electron volts.

    This dataset can be found at: http://hesperia.gsfc.nasa.gov/hessi/

    See all pages that use this dataset
  • [TRACE]

    ID: 106
    Dates used: 2002/07/23T00:00:59-2002/07/23T03:32:45

    The TRACE satellite views the Sun at ultraviolet wavelengths with high temporal (approximately 1-12 seconds) and spatial (1 arcsecond per pixel) resolution. Launched on April 2, 1998, it orbits the Earth in a Sun-synchronous orbit.

    This dataset can be found at: http://sunland.gsfc.nasa.gov/smex/trace/

    See all pages that use this dataset
  • H-alpha [Big Bear Solar Observatory: H-alpha Telescope]

    ID: 265
    Type: Observed DataSensor: H-alpha TelescopeDates used: 2002/07/22T16:22:36-2002/07/23T01:21:45

    Solar imagery in Hydrogen-alpha spectral line

    This dataset can be found at: http://www.bbso.njit.edu

    See all pages that use this dataset

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