NASA Has Eyes On The Atlantic Hurricane Season

  • Released Monday, June 3rd, 2019
  • Updated Wednesday, May 3rd, 2023 at 1:45PM
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NASA has a unique and important view of hurricanes around the planet. Satellites and aircraft watch as storms form, travel across the ocean and sometimes, make landfall. After the hurricanes have passed, the satellites and aircraft see the aftermath of hurricanes, from downed forests to mass power loss.

Complete transcript available.

Music credits: “Northern Breeze” by Denis Levaillant [SACEM], “Stunning Horizon” by Maxime Lebidois [SACEM], Ronan Maillard [SACEM], “Magnetic Force” by JC Lemay [SACEM] from Killer Tracks

Watch this video on the NASA Goddard YouTube channel.

This video can be freely shared and downloaded. While the video in its entirety can be shared without permission, some individual imagery provided by pond5.com is obtained through permission and may not be excised or remixed in other products. Specific details on stock footage may be found here. For more information on NASA’s media guidelines, visit https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/guidelines/index.html.

Notes on footage:

• 0:03 - 0:17 provided by Pond5

• 1:38 - 1.43 provided by Pond5

• 1:49 - 1:52 provided by Pond5

• 2:21 - 1:27 provided by Pond5

GIFThe Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center created this visualization using the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) computer model. When combined with data from NASA’s satellites, the model becomes a tool for scientists to fully understand aerosols’ impact and how they fit into the global Earth system.

GIF

The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center created this visualization using the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) computer model. When combined with data from NASA’s satellites, the model becomes a tool for scientists to fully understand aerosols’ impact and how they fit into the global Earth system.

GIFFrom space, NASA satellites can monitor hurricanes as they form, develop and dissapate.

GIF

From space, NASA satellites can monitor hurricanes as they form, develop and dissapate.

GIFNASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Mission tracks rainfall in near-real time and can create detailed, 3D images of storms as they form.

GIF

NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Mission tracks rainfall in near-real time and can create detailed, 3D images of storms as they form.

GIFResearch scientist Doug Morton of Goddard was part of the team of NASA researchers who had surveyed Puerto Rico's forests six months before the storm with Goddard’s Lidar, Hyperspectral, and Thermal (G-LiHT) Airborne Imager, a system designed to study the structure and species composition of Puerto Rican forests. Shooting 600,000 laser pulses per second, G-LiHT produces a 3D view of the forest structure in high resolution. In April 2018, post-Maria, they went back and surveyed the same tracks as in 2017.

GIF

Research scientist Doug Morton of Goddard was part of the team of NASA researchers who had surveyed Puerto Rico's forests six months before the storm with Goddard’s Lidar, Hyperspectral, and Thermal (G-LiHT) Airborne Imager, a system designed to study the structure and species composition of Puerto Rican forests. Shooting 600,000 laser pulses per second, G-LiHT produces a 3D view of the forest structure in high resolution. In April 2018, post-Maria, they went back and surveyed the same tracks as in 2017.



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Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


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