Earth  Sun  ID: 12638

How to View the Solar Eclipse with a Pinhole Projector

You don't necessarily need fancy equipment to watch one of the sky's most awesome shows: a solar eclipse. With just a few simple supplies, you can make a pinhole camera that allows you to view the event safely and easily.

Before you get started, remember: You should never look at the sun directly without equipment that's specifically designed for solar viewing. Do not use standard binoculars or telescopes to watch the eclipse, as the light could severely damage your eyes. Sunglasses also do NOT count as protection when attempting to look directly at the sun.

Stay safe and still enjoy the sun's stellar shows by creating your very own pinhole camera. It's easy!

See another pinhole camera tutorial at https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/learn/project/how-to-make-a-pinhole-camera/

A pinhole camera is just one of many viewing options. Learn more at https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety

Find more videos about the solar ecilpse on the Sun Eclipse 2017 gallery page.
 

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Credits

Genna Duberstein (USRA): Lead Producer
Josh Masters (USRA): Animator
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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This item is part of these series:
Narrated Movies
2017 Solar Eclipse

Keywords:
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Music
SVS >> Safety
SVS >> Sun
SVS >> Edited Feature
SVS >> Eclipse
NASA Science >> Earth
NASA Science >> Sun
SVS >> Pinhole Projector