Planets and Moons  ID: 11603

Investigating the Martian Atmosphere

The Martian surface bears ample evidence of flowing water in its youth, from crater lakes and riverbeds to minerals that only form in water. But today Mars is cold and dry, and scientists think that the loss of Mars' water may have been caused by the loss of its early atmosphere. NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission, or MAVEN, will be the first spacecraft devoted to studying the Red Planet's upper atmosphere, in an effort to understand how the Martian climate has changed over time.
 

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Credits

Walt Feimer (HTSI): Lead Animator
Michael Lentz (USRA): Animator
Greg Shirah (NASA/GSFC): Animator
Ernie Wright (USRA): Animator
Chris Smith (HTSI): Animator
Dan Gallagher (USRA): Video Editor
Dan Gallagher (USRA): Narrator
Michael Starobin (HTSI): Producer
Bruce Jakosky (LASP): Scientist
David Folta (NASA/GSFC): Scientist
Aaron E. Lepsch (ADNET Systems Inc.): Project Support
Rob Andreoli (AIMM): Videographer
Dan Gallagher (USRA): Videographer
Michael Starobin (HTSI): Writer
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Short URL to share this page:
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/11603

Mission:
MAVEN: Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN

This item is part of these series:
Narrated Movies
MAVEN

Goddard TV Tape:
G2014-061 -- MAVEN MOI

Keywords:
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Mars
SVS >> Orbit
SVS >> Solar System
SVS >> MAVEN
DLESE >> Narrated
SVS >> Planetary Science
SVS >> Solar System >> Planets >> Mars >> Atmosphere
NASA Science >> Planets and Moons