Operation IceBridge - Antarctic Campaigns: Produced Videos

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2010

  • IceBridge Antarctic Peninsula Flight Highlights - Nov. 13, 2010
    2010.11.15
    The IceBridge science team and DC-8 crew flew a mission over the Antarctic Peninsula on Saturday, November 13th. This video provides a snapshot of the flight from the field and describes the challenges faced with weather and terrain. All instruments collected data for several glaciers before the weather conditions forced an early return to Punta Arenas.
  • IceBridge Kicks Off Antarctic 2010 Campaign
    2010.10.18
    On October 18th, NASA's Operation IceBridge scientists and the DC-8 crew departed for Punta Arenas, Chile where they will begin the Antarctic 2010 phase of the mission. For the next five weeks, instrumnents aboard the DC-8 will collect data to determine surface elevation and ice characteristics near and over Antarctica.

2011

  • Operation IceBridge Discovers Massive Crack In Ice Shelf
    2011.11.02
    NASA's DC-8 flew over the Pine Island Glacier Ice Shelf on Oct. 14, 2011, as part of Operation IceBridge. A large, long-running crack was plainly visible across the ice shelf. The DC-8 took off on Oct. 26, 2011, to collect more data on the ice shelf and the crack. The area beyond the crack that could calve in the coming months covers about 310 square miles (800 sq. km).
  • Operation IceBridge Antarctica 2011 Mission Preview
    2011.10.13
    In preparation for Operation IceBridge's Antarctica 2011 campaign, flight crews at NASA Dryden worked to outfit the DC-8 aircraft — NASA's long-haul "workhorse" — with an array of different instruments designed to measure sea ice, ice sheets, and even the bedrock below Antarctic glaciers.
  • West Antarctica's Weak Spot
    2011.11.08
    NASA has put an airborne mission in the field that will continue critical measurements of a worrisome glacier.

2012

  • Operation IceBridge 2012 Antarctic Campaign video series
    2012.11.16
    This year Operation IceBridge completed 16 science flights over Antarctica and nearby sea ice, flying once again out of Punta Arenas, Chile. This video series contains a diverse set of products reflecting the science and adventure of the mission.
  • Sea Ice Atlas
    2012.12.04
    Flying low over Antarctic waters, Operation IceBridge gets a mesmerizing view of sea ice.
  • Flying through the Rift: An update on the crack in the P.I.G.
    2012.03.06
    NASA's DC-8 flew over the Pine Island Glacier Ice Shelf on Oct. 14, 2011, as part of Operation IceBridge. A large, long-running crack was plainly visible across the ice shelf. The DC-8 took off on Oct. 26, 2011, to collect more data on the ice shelf and the crack. The area beyond the crack that could calve in the coming months covers about 310 square miles (800 sq. km).
  • Ice Canyon
    2012.04.12
    Take to the air above and through a widening rift across an Antarctic ice shelf.

2013

2014

  • Operation IceBridge 2013 Antarctic Campaign B-Roll
    2014.04.01
    Raw video footage from Operation IceBridge's 2013 science campaign out of McMurdo Station Antartica

  • OIB: Fourwheeling Antarctica
    2014.10.08
    Not everyone was sure Kyle Krabill’s four-wheeler would function in the Antarctic cold. But with some help from the talented techs at the National Science Foundation, the little ATV played a critical role in supporting Operation IceBridge’s 2013 campaign out of remote McMurdo Station.
  • OIB: McMurdo Accomplished, West Antarctic Calling
    2014.10.27
    Last year Operation IceBridge flew for the first time out of McMurdo Station in Antarctica, reaching a new slate of exciting science targets. But that means it's now been two years since the mission has flown over critical areas in West Antarctica, and so the airborne campaign is returning to fly out of Punta Arenas, Chile to monitor quickly-changing ice closer to the Antarctic Peninsula.

2016

  • IceBridge images of crack in Larsen C Ice Shelf
    2016.12.08
    Operation IceBridge, a NASA airborne survey of changes in polar ice, recently completed its eighth consecutive Antarctic deployment. This page contains a wrapup video for the entire mission, as well as some footage over the Antarctic Peninsula's Larsen C Ice Shelf, and a few high definition still images. One of this year’s missions flew over a massive rift in the Larsen C. Ice shelves are the floating parts of ice streams and glaciers, and they buttress the grounded ice behind them; when ice shelves collapse, the ice behind accelerates toward the ocean, where it then adds to sea level rise. Larsen C neighbors a smaller ice shelf that disintegrated in 2002 after developing a rift similar to the one now growing in Larsen C. The IceBridge scientists measured the Larsen C fracture to be about 70 miles long, more than 300 feet wide and about a third of a mile deep. The crack completely cuts through the ice shelf but it does not go all the way across it – once it does, it will produce an iceberg roughly the size of the state of Delaware. "It’s a large rift on an ice shelf whose future we are curious about. Inevitably, when you see it in satellite imagery or from a plane, you wonder what is going to happen when it breaks off,” said Joe MacGregor, IceBridge deputy project scientist and glaciologist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. "However, large icebergs calve from ice shelves regularly and they normally do not lead to ice-shelf collapse. The growth of this rift likely indicates that the portion of the ice shelf downstream of the rift is no longer holding back any grounded ice.” For more about Operation IceBridge and to follow future campaigns, visit: www.nasa.gov/icebridge https://www.facebook.com/NasaOperationIcebridge

2018

Section 8

  • NASA’s Operation IceBridge Completes Eleven Years of Polar Surveys
    2019.12.11
    For eleven years from 2009 to 2019, the planes of NASA’s Operation IceBridge flew above the Arctic, Antarctic and Alaska, gathering data on the height, depth, thickness, flow and change of sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets. Designed to collect data during the years between NASA’s two Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellites, ICESat and ICESat-2, IceBridge made its final polar flight in November 2019, one year after ICESat-2’s successful launch. The fleet of aircraft carried more than a dozen instruments, from elevation-mapping lasers and ice-penetrating radars to optical and infrared cameras. And the mission did much more than bridge the altimetry gap – it enabled many other discoveries, too, from diminishing snow cover over Arctic sea ice to impact craters hidden beneath Greenland’s ice. As the team and planes move on to their next assignments, the scientists and engineers reflected on a decade of IceBridge’s most significant accomplishments.