Museum Videos

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Visuals

  • Earth Today 1998 Introduction
    1998.10.20
    The ability to see Earth from space has forever changed our view of the planet. We are now able to look at the Earth as a whole, and observe how its atmosphere, oceans, land masses, and life interact as global systems. Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere are dynamic, changing on timescales of days, minutes, or even seconds. Monitoring the Earth in near real time allows us to get an up to date picture of conditions on our planet. More SVS visualizations for the Earth Today exhibit can be found in animation ids 328 and 1402.
  • Earth Today 1998 Countdown
    1998.10.20
    The ability to see Earth from space has forever changed our view of the planet. We are now able to look at the Earth as a whole, and observe how its atmosphere, oceans, land masses, and life interact as global systems. Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere are dynamic, changing on timescales of days, minutes, or even seconds. Monitoring the Earth in near real time allows us to get an up to date picture of conditions on our planet. More SVS visualizations for the Earth Today exhibit are in animation ids 1401 and 1402.
  • The HoloGlobe Project (Version 3)
    1996.08.01
    These animations were produced for the Smithsonian Institution's HoloGlobe Exhibit which opened to the public on August 10, 1996 at the Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. The various data sets show progressive global change mapped onto a rotating globe and projected into space to create a holographic image of the Earth. The exhibit shows that Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere are dynamic, changing on timescales of days, minutes, or even seconds. The exhibit has since been relocated to the west coast. This is a revised version from Animation #116 [The HoloGlobe Project (version 2)].
  • The HoloGlobe Project (Version 2)
    1996.10.25
    This animation was produced for the Smithsonian Institution's HoloGlobe Exhibit which opened to the public on August 10, 1996. The various orthographic data sets showing progressive global change were mapped onto a rotating globe and projected into space to create a holographic image of the Earth. Showing Earthandapos;s atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere are dynamic, changing on timescales of days, minutes, or even seconds. This animation is a revised version of Animation #96 [The HoloGlobe Project (Version 1)].
  • The HoloGlobe Project (Version 1)
    1996.08.01
    This animation was originally produced for the Smithsonian Institution's HoloGlobe Exhibit which opened to the public on August 10, 1996 at the Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. These various data sets showing progressive global change were mapped onto a rotating globe and projected into space to create a holographic image of the Earth. Showing Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere are dynamic, changing on timescales of days, minutes, or even seconds.