Fulldome Gallery

Visualizations in fulldome format for display in digital planetariums.

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Fulldome videos

  • Antarctic Ocean Flows: an excerpt from Atlas of a Changing Earth (Dome Master format)
    2021.08.24
    In this visualization of Antarctica, we cruise along the coastline of the Amundsen Sea from Cape Dart to the Pine Island Bay. Initially we pass the massive Getz Ice Shelf on our right stretching over 300 miles (500 km) along the coast. As we approach the Smith Glacier and the Dotson Ice Shelf, the sea surface becomes transparent allowing us to see the ocean flows moving under the surface. These flows portray the direction, speed and temperature of the ocean circulation based on version 3 of the ECCO ocean circulation model. The flows are colored by temperature, spanning the range from 29.75 degrees fahrenteit (-1.25 degrees celsius) shown in blue to 34.25 degrees fahrenheit (+1.25 degrees celsius) shown in red. We see the ocean flows circulating around the Pine Island Bay and under the adjacent floating ice tongue of the Thwaites Glacier. As we approach the Pine Island Glacier, we dip below the surface of the bay and see the stratification of the temperature in the ocean flows, with the coldest water shown in blue near the surface and the warmer water shown in red at lower depths. We move forward under the floating ice of the Pine Island Glacier and see how the warmer ocean flows are circulating under the glacier's floating tongue, eroding the ice from beneath. The topography in this visualization has been exaggerated by 4x above sea level and 15x below sea level in order to more clearly observe the change in ocean temperature at various depths. This version is provided in Dome Master format meant for projection onto a planetarium dome. A version of this visualization designed to play on a flat screen is available here.
  • Arctic Sea Ice 2020-2021, Domemaster Format
    2021.05.22
    This visualzation depicts changes in Arctic sea ice extent during 2020 and 2021, in domemaster format, derived from NASA's AMSR2 instrument about JAXA's SHIZUKU (GCOM-W1) satellite. The video here is appropriate for use in planetarium shows and other hemispherical displays.
  • Dynamic Earth Dome Show - Biosphere
    2013.10.01
    This visualization was a prototype affiliated with the 'Dynamic Earth', an Earth science planetarium show. The visualization shows the global biosphere and NDVI from the SeaWiFS instrument with MODIS ice and snow overlayed.The images were rendered using a fish eye technique so that they would project properly onto a planetarium dome.

    Earth scientists are able to measure many of the Earth's 'vital signs', and just like a doctor measures our vital signs to see how healthy we are. Scientists will use these measurements of the Earth to better understand how the Earth functions, how the different systems on Earth interact and how those interactions have set the stage upon which life flourishes. The visualization shows a timeseries of images of SeaWiFS Global Biosphere - the ocean's long-term average phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration acquired between September 1997 and September 2007 combined with the SeaWiFS-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index over land. On land, the dark greens show where there is abundant vegetation and tans show relatively sparse plant cover. In the oceans, red, yellow, and green pixels show dense phytoplankton blooms, those regions of the ocean that are the most productive over time, while blues and purples show where there is very little of the microscopic marine plants called phytoplankton.

    Remote sensing, especially using satellite-mounted colour scanners (SeaWiFS and similar platforms), is advocated for broad-based monitoring of chlorophyll once appropriate algorithms have been developed and proved. The concentration of the photosynthetic pigment chlorophyll a (referred to as chlorophyll) in marine waters is a proven indicator of the biomass of phytoplankton, the organisms that constitute the base of the marine food web. Fluorometry provides an estimate of chlorophyll levels in sea water and thus an estimate of primary productivity in the upper part of the water column.

    For more information on monitoring the Earth from Space with SeaWIFS see

    http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/TEACHERS/.

  • Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice for the Dynamic Earth Dome Show
    2013.03.01
    Sea ice is frozen seawater floating on the surface of the ocean. Some sea ice is semi-permanent, persisting from year to year, and some is seasonal, melting and refreezing from season to season. The sea ice cover reaches its minimum extent at the end of each summer and the remaining ice is called the perennial ice cover. This animation first shows the advance and retreat of the Arctic sea ice followed by same for the Antarctic sea ice. The sea ice changes from day to day showing a running 3-day average sea ice concentration in the region where the concentration is greater than 15%. The blueish white color of the sea ice is derived from a 3-day running miniimum of the AMSR-E 89 GHz brightness temperature. The animation ends by flying over the Antarctic Peninsula.

    This was created for a planetarium dome show called Dynamic Earth and is produced in 'domemaster format'. The domemaster format was created by rendering 7 separate 2048x2048 camera tiles. The tiles were then stitched together to form final domemaster at 4096x4096 resolution. Both the tiles and the domemaster were rendered with 16 bits per channel with no gamma correction. Two domemaster layers were generated for this animation: the Earth showing sea ice advancing or retreating rendered with transparency and the star background without transparency. This visualization was shown in the "VR Village" at SIGGRAPH 2015.

  • Earth Observing Spacecraft Fleet shot for Dynamic Earth Dome Show
    2013.10.01
    This visualization shows the orbits of NASA's fleet of Earth observing spacecraft. It also includes the International Space Station and Hubble Space Telescope. This was created for a planetarium dome show called Dynamic Earth and is produced in domemaster format (a type of fisheye projection).

    The domemaster format was created by rendering 7 separate camera tiles. The tiles were then stitched together to form final domemaster layers at 4096x4096 resolution and 16 bits per channel with premultiplied alpha and no gamma correction. A composite version is provided along with the layers. There are 3 domemaster layers intended to be composited as follows: the Earth and orbits layer over Sun layer over star field (no alpha channel).

  • The Coronal Mass Ejection strikes the Earth!
    2012.09.01
    This visualization is the sequel to animation ID 3867.

    The CME we saw before continues to expand from the Sun, and its outer boundary is approaching the Earth. Will the Earth be pummeled like its sister planet, Venus?

    Not this time, for the Earth has a fairly strong geomagnetic field.

    The geomagnetic field helps deflect the incoming blast of solar particles around the Earth, dramatically reducing the impact of the event.

    It is important to note that the flowing material of the CME are actually ions and electrons far too small to see. This visualization tries to represent the motions of these tiny particle in a form large enough for us to see.

    Technical Details

    This is the dome show component where the CME strikes the Earth.

    The domemaster format was created by rendering 7 separate camera tiles. The tiles were then stitched together to form final domemaster layers at 4096x4096 resolution and 16 bits per channel with premultiplied alpha and no gamma correction. There are 2 domemaster layers that should be composited as follows:

    - Earth, Sun and particles

    - star field (no alpha channel)

    In addition to the final domemaster frames and movies, the individual camera tiles are included as well. Each domemaster layer has a set of camera tiles. There are 7 cameras numbered 00 through 06 that represent the itiles. Camera 00 is in the center of the domemaster, camera 01 is looking below camera 00, cameras 01 through 06 look around the outside of the dome master in counter-clockwise order. These frames are probably only useful if a better re-stitching algorithm is ever required to be run on the tiles.

  • A Coronal Mass Ejection strikes Venus!
    2012.09.01
    Energetic events on the Sun have impacts throughout the Solar System. This visualization, developed for the "Dynamic Earth" dome show, opens with a closeup view of the Sun. The solar imagery was collected from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) using an ultraviolet filter (wavelength 304 Ångstroms or 30.4 nanometers). We can observe jets of ionized gases, called prominences, erupting from the solar surface, and often constrained to loop-shaped trajectories due to the solar magnetic field.

    We pull out from the Sun to reveal the solar wind, which continuously streams outward from the Sun.

    We eventually reach the orbit of the planet Venus, the solar wind still streaming around us.

    But a massive eruption, called a coronal mass ejection, or CME, takes place on the Sun, sending a much higher density of particles (ions and electrons) outward into the solar wind.

    The wave of particles eventually strikes the planet Venus. But Venus has no significant magnetic field, and the particles make it directly to the atmosphere of the planet. These energetic solar events slowly blow away the atmosphere of the planet.

    The next part of this sequence is "The Coronal Mass Ejection strikes the Earth!".

    Technical Details

    This is the dome show component moving from the Sun to Venus being hit by the CME.

    The domemaster format was created by rendering 7 separate camera tiles. The tiles were then stitched together to form final domemaster layers at 4096x4096 resolution and 16 bits per channel with premultiplied alpha and no gamma correction. There are 3 domemaster layers that should be composited as follows:

    - Earth and orbits

    - Sun

    - star field (no alpha channel)

    In addition to the final domemaster frames and movies, the individual camera tiles are included as well. Each domemaster layer has a set of camera tiles. There are 7 cameras numbered 00 through 06 that represent the itiles. Camera 00 is in the center of the domemaster, camera 01 is looking below camera 00, cameras 01 through 06 look around the outside of the dome master in counter-clockwise order. These frames are probably only useful if a better re-stitching algorithm is ever required to be run on the tiles.

  • Wind and Ocean Circulation shot for Dynamic Earth Dome Show
    2013.10.01
    This visualization was created for the planetarium dome show film called Dynamic Earth. It is rendered with a fish-eye projection, called domemaster, which is why it looks circular. In a dome, the image fills the dome's hemisphere so that the parts near the bottom of the image are low and in front of the view, the top of the image is behind the viewer, and the left and right sides are to the left and right of the viewer.

    The camera slowly pushes in towards the Earth revealing global wind patterns. The wind patterns are from the MERRA computational model of the atomsphere. As the camera continues to push in, the winds fade away, revealing ocean currents which are driven, in part, by the winds. The ocean currents are from the ECCO-2 computational model of the oceans and ice. Only the higher speed ocean currents are shown. The camera moves around the Western Atlantic highlighting the Gulf stream from above and below. The camera finally emerges from beneath sea level and moves over to the Gulf of Mexico to examine the Loop Current.

    This shot is designed to seamlessly match to the end of the Earth/CME shot (animation id #3551.). Topographic features are exaggerated 20 times above water and 40 times below water. The exaggeration is primarily to allow the viewer to distinguish the depths of the flow fields. This visualization was shown in the "VR Village" at SIGGRAPH 2015.

  • Evolution of the Moon
    2012.03.14
    From year to year, the moon never seems to change. Craters and other formations appear to be permanent now, but the moon didn't always look like this. Thanks to NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, we now have a better look at some of the moon's history. Learn more in this video!

    This entry contains the Evolution of the Moon video in mutliple formats, including stereoscopic 3D in both side-by-side and individual left/right channel versions. It also includes a narrated and non-narrated version. Each individual video is labeled to make it easier to find the version that works for you!

  • Mars Evolution from Wet to Dry for Planetariums
    2016.05.24
    Ancient regions on Mars bear signs of abundant water - such as features resembling valleys and deltas, and minerals that only form in the presence of liquid water. Scientists think that billions of years ago, the atmosphere of Mars was much denser and warm enough to form rivers, lakes, and perhaps even oceans of water. As the planet cooled and lost its global magnetic field, the solar wind and solar storms eroded away to space a significant amount of the planet’s atmosphere, turning Mars into the cold, arid desert we see today. The goal of MAVEN is to determine how much of Mars’ atmosphere and water have been lost to space, and how these processes have changed the climate on the Red Planet over its history.
  • Dynamic Earth Dome Prototype: Hemisphere
    2007.01.23
    This visualization was a prototype affiliated with the 'Dynamic Earth', a proposed Earth science planetarium show. The visualization shows the global biosphere from the SeaWiFS instrument with ice and snow overlayed.

    The images were rendered using a fish eye technique so that they would project properly onto a planetarium dome.

  • Dynamic Earth Dome Protoype: Fly Around
    2007.01.23
    This visualization was a prototype affiliated with 'Dynamic Earth', a proposed Earth science planetarium show. The visualization shows a flyover of North America towards Greenland. MODIS Blue Marble data is initially used, then fading to SeaWiFS based biosphere data. MODIS based snow and ice are overlayed on the biosphere data. The images were rendered using a fish eye technique so that they would project properly onto a planetarium dome. The horizon was kept at approximately the 'sweet spot' based on typical viewer locations in a planetarium.
  • SIGGRAPH 2015: VR Village
    2015.08.03
    These visualizations were created for the planetarium dome show film called Dynamic Earth, produced by Tom Lucas in cooperation with the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and Spitz, Inc. Their format is in a fish-eye projection, called domemaster, which is why they look circular. In a dome, the image fills the dome's hemisphere so that the parts near the bottom of the image are low and in front of the viewer, the top of the image is behind the viewer, and the left and right sides are to the left and right of the viewer. The domemaster format was created by rendering 7 separate 2048x2048 camera tiles: 6 at different rotational angles aroung the center axis and one looking overhead. The tiles were then reprojected and stitched together to form the final domemaster at a 4096x4096 resolution.