Planets and Moons  ID: 4221

Hyperwall: Dionysius Crater

This image set is formatted for NASA's hyperwall, a tiled display with a combined resolution of up to 9600 x 3240.

Dionysius crater (17.297°E, 2.766°N) is situated on the western edge of Mare Tranquillitatis (the Sea of Tranquility) and excavates both bright (highland) and dark (mare) materials. Dark banded layers of mare peek out of the eastern wall, where mare material was disturbed by the impact that formed Dionysius crater. Bright talus trails wind downslope through crags and crannies in the dark mare scarps.

Looking closely, the mare appears banded or striated, indicating a non-uniform material. In general, mare are thought to form from large volumes of fluid lavas, much like the Columbia River Basalts in the Pacific Northwest of North America. The stratifications in the lunar mare may represent a series of lava flows in the region.

For More Information

http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/748


Visualization Credits

Ernie Wright (USRA): Lead Animator
Laurence Schuler (ADNET Systems Inc.): Project Support
Ian Jones (ADNET Systems Inc.): Project Support
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/GSFC/ASU/SVS

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http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4221

Mission:
LRO (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter)

Data Used:
LRO/LROC/Narrow Angle Camera August 26, 2010
Note: While we identify the data sets used in these visualizations, we do not store any further details nor the data sets themselves on our site.

This item is part of this series:
The Moon

Keywords:
SVS >> Lunar
SVS >> Moon
SVS >> Hyperwall
SVS >> LRO
SVS >> Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
SVS >> LROC
NASA Science >> Planets and Moons