2023 Ozone Hole Update

  • Released Wednesday, November 1st, 2023
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The 2023 Antarctic ozone hole reached its maximum size at 10 million square miles, or 26 million square kilometers, on Sept. 21, which ranks as the 16th largest since 1979, according to annual satellite and balloon-based measurements made by NASA and NOAA.

During the peak of the ozone depletion season from Sept. 7 to Oct. 13, the hole averaged 8.9 million square miles (23.1 million square kilometers), approximately the size of North America

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NASA Earth Observatory image by Lauren Dauphin, using data courtesy of NASA Ozone Watch and GEOS-5 data from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office at NASA GSFC.This map shows the size and shape of the ozone hole over the South Pole on September 21, 2023, the day of its maximum extent as calculated by the NASA Ozone Watch team. Moderate ozone losses (orange) are visible amid widespread areas of more potent ozone losses (red).

NASA Earth Observatory image by Lauren Dauphin, using data courtesy of NASA Ozone Watch and GEOS-5 data from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office at NASA GSFC.

This map shows the size and shape of the ozone hole over the South Pole on September 21, 2023, the day of its maximum extent as calculated by the NASA Ozone Watch team. Moderate ozone losses (orange) are visible amid widespread areas of more potent ozone losses (red).

NASA Earth Observatory image by Lauren Dauphin, using data courtesy of NASA Ozone Watch and GEOS-5 data from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office at NASA GSFC.This map shows the size and shape of the ozone hole over the South Pole on September 21, 2023, the day of its maximum extent as calculated by the NASA Ozone Watch team. Moderate ozone losses (orange) are visible amid widespread areas of more potent ozone losses (red).

NASA Earth Observatory image by Lauren Dauphin, using data courtesy of NASA Ozone Watch and GEOS-5 data from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office at NASA GSFC.

This map shows the size and shape of the ozone hole over the South Pole on September 21, 2023, the day of its maximum extent as calculated by the NASA Ozone Watch team. Moderate ozone losses (orange) are visible amid widespread areas of more potent ozone losses (red).



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NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


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