Sun Time Science: Big Sun, Little Moon

  • Released Friday, October 21st, 2022
  • Updated Wednesday, May 3rd, 2023 at 11:43AM
  • ID: 14229

How can the small moon cover up the big Sun? Explore how solar eclipses can happen by using items from your own home in this do it yourself science activity. To do this activity, you will need two objects of similar shape, a bit of space and either someone to hold one object in place or some wall safe tape.

To learn more about the Sun, visit: https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/menu/sun/
To learn more about eclipses, visit: https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/eclipses

A partial solar eclipse is seen as the sun rises behind the Delaware Breakwater Lighthouse, Thursday, June 10, 2021, at Lewes Beach in Delaware. The annular or “ring of fire” solar eclipse is only visible to some parts of Greenland, Northern Russia, and Canada. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

A partial solar eclipse is seen as the sun rises behind the Delaware Breakwater Lighthouse, Thursday, June 10, 2021, at Lewes Beach in Delaware. The annular or “ring of fire” solar eclipse is only visible to some parts of Greenland, Northern Russia, and Canada.

Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)



Credits

Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. However, individual items should be credited as indicated above.


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