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Weathercasters: Global Hawk

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Other multimedia items related to this story:
     Global Hawk takes High Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Profiler(HIWRAP) data (id 4036)
     Global Hawk observes the Saharan Air Layer through the Cloud Physics Lidar(CPL) during Hurricane Nadine (id 4102)
     HS3 video resources and interview clips (id 11039)
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LEAD: NASA is using a special plane to help hurricane forecasters this summer. This unmanned plane, Global Hawk,  flies at 60,000 feet (twice the height of commercial planes) It takes x-ray-like “cat- scans” of the inside of a hurricane: such as the towers of heavy rain that help energize storms. Because it can stay up for 24 hours it can examine the entire hurricane, Head to toe. TAG: Information will help forecasters determine why some hurricanes blow up from a minimal category one (1) storm to a devastating monster category 5 in less than a day. Especially critical when they approach landfall.    LEAD: NASA is using a special plane to help hurricane forecasters this summer.

This unmanned plane, Global Hawk, flies at 60,000 feet (twice the height of commercial planes)

It takes x-ray-like “cat- scans” of the inside of a hurricane: such as the towers of heavy rain that help energize storms.

Because it can stay up for 24 hours it can examine the entire hurricane, Head to toe.

TAG: Information will help forecasters determine why some hurricanes blow up from a minimal category one (1) storm to a devastating monster category 5 in less than a day. Especially critical when they approach landfall.


Duration: 30.0 seconds
Available formats:
  1920x1080 (30 fps) QT         598 MB
  1280x720 (60 fps) QT         702 MB
  1920x1080 (30 fps) QT         220 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) WMV         15 MB
  1280x720 (30 fps) MPEG       17 MB
  1920x1080 (30 fps) MPEG-4   25 MB
  1920x1080 (29.97 fps) QT         475 MB
  960x540 (30 fps) MPEG-4   5 MB
  1280x720 (30 fps) MPEG-4   11 MB
  1920x1080 (30 fps) MPEG-4   25 MB
  960x540 (30 fps) WEBM         4 MB
  1920x1080 JPEG         1 MB
  320x180     PNG           67 KB
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Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11505
Animation Number:11505
Completed:2014-03-06
Producer:Howard Joe Witte (ADNET Systems, Inc)
Project Support:Aaron E Lepsch (ADNET Systems, Inc.)
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
 
Keywords:
SVS >> HDTV
NASA Science >> Earth
 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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