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MAVEN Particles & Fields Package

To planetary scientists, the Martian atmosphere presents an intriguing mystery: today it's a thin, cold wisp of carbon dioxide with just one percent the pressure of Earth's atmosphere, but long ago it was thick and warm enough to support lakes and rivers on the Martian surface. How did Mars lose so much of its early atmosphere? Scientists think that the solar wind may be responsible, and NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is designed to find out. The instruments of MAVEN's Particles & Fields package will study the interaction of the solar wind with Mars's upper atmosphere, helping scientists to better understand how Mars became the freeze-dried planet that we see today.
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Other multimedia items related to this story:
     MAVEN Magnetometer (id 11224)
     MAVEN Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (id 11295)
     MAVEN Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (id 11310)
More information on this topic available at:
http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/

Studying the Solar Wind at Mars Robert Lin, the late director of the Space Sciences Laboratory, discusses how NASA's MAVEN spacecraft will study the interaction of the Martian atmosphere with the solar wind. MAVEN's findings will reveal how Mars lost its early atmosphere, turning it from a warm, wet planet into the cold, dry one that we see today. Watch this video on the NASAexplorer YouTube channel .    Studying the Solar Wind at Mars
Robert Lin, the late director of the Space Sciences Laboratory, discusses how NASA's MAVEN spacecraft will study the interaction of the Martian atmosphere with the solar wind. MAVEN's findings will reveal how Mars lost its early atmosphere, turning it from a warm, wet planet into the cold, dry one that we see today.

Watch this video on the NASAexplorer YouTube channel.

For complete transcript, click here.
Duration: 3.4 minutes
Available formats:
  960x540 (29.97 fps) WEBM         49 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         342 MB
  960x540 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   101 MB
  320x240 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   21 MB
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         3 GB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) WMV         117 MB
  640x360 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   40 MB
  640x360 (29.97 fps) QT         96 MB
  1280x720   PNG           1 MB
  320x180     PNG           96 KB
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Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11498
Animation Number:11498
Completed:2014-02-28
Animators:Michael Lentz (USRA) (Lead)
 Chris Meaney (HTSI)
 Chris Smith (HTSI)
Video Editor:Dan Gallagher (USRA)
Interviewee:Robert Lin (University of California, Berkeley)
Producer:Dan Gallagher (USRA)
Scientists:Robert Lin (University of California, Berkeley)
 David L. Mitchell (Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley)
Project Support:Aaron E Lepsch (ADNET Systems, Inc.)
 David Silberberg
Videographers:Rob Andreoli (AIMM)
 Kevin Deane (Oakville Lane Productions, Inc.)
Series:Narrated Movies
 MAVEN Instrument Profiles
Goddard TV Tape:G2013-003 -- MAVEN Particles and Fields
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
 
Keywords:
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Mars
SVS >> Solar Wind
SVS >> MAVEN
SVS >> Solar System >> Planets >> Mars >> Atmosphere
NASA Science >> Sun
NASA Science >> Planets and Moons
SVS >> Magnetometer
SVS >> Particles and Fields
 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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