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GPM: Countdown to Launch

GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The Core Observatory will link data from a constellation of current and planned satellites to produce next-generation global measurements of rainfall and snowfall from space.

The GPM mission is the first coordinated international satellite network to provide near real-time observations of rain and snow every three hours anywhere on the globe. The GPM Core Observatory anchors this network by providing observations on all types of precipitation. The observatory's data acts as the measuring stick by which partner observations can be combined into a unified data set. The data will be used by scientists to study climate change, freshwater resources, floods and droughts, and hurricane formation and tracking.

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GPM's Last Stop Before Orbit Art Azarbarzin, the NASA/GPM Project Manager, and Mashahiro Kojima, the JAXA GPM/DPR Project Manager, reflect on the long journey the GPM Core Observatory spacecraft has taken to reach its last stop before orbit, the Tanegashima Space Center, Japan.    GPM's Last Stop Before Orbit

Art Azarbarzin, the NASA/GPM Project Manager, and Mashahiro Kojima, the JAXA GPM/DPR Project Manager, reflect on the long journey the GPM Core Observatory spacecraft has taken to reach its last stop before orbit, the Tanegashima Space Center, Japan.
Duration: 1.9 minutes
Available formats:
  720x480 (29.97 fps) WMV         53 MB
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         1 GB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         92 MB
  640x360 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   21 MB
  320x240 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   11 MB
  640x360 (29.97 fps) QT         52 MB
  960x540 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   53 MB
  1630x909   PNG           1 MB
  960x540 (29.97 fps) WEBM         26 MB
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Greetings from Minamitane!    Greetings from Minamitane!

For complete transcript, click here.
Duration: 1.5 minutes
Available formats:
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  720x480     WMV         48 MB
  960x540     MPEG-4   43 MB
  320x240     MPEG-4   9 MB
  640x360     MPEG-4   17 MB
  640x360     QT         43 MB
  960x540     WEBM         22 MB
  1024x576   JPEG         134 KB
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Fairing Encapsulation Compete Footage courtesy of JAXA/MHI On Feb. 11, the Core Observatory was moved into the spacecraft fairing assembly building and into the Encapsulation Hall. Final inspections and preparations were completed for the installation into the fairing, which began on Feb 13. The fairing is the part of the rocket that will contain the spacecraft at the top of the H-IIA rocket. The encapsulation process for the H-IIA is very different than for most U.S. rockets. For U.S. rockets, the fairing is usually in two pieces that close around the payload like a clamshell. To install the GPM Core Observatory into the fairing of the H-IIA rocket, first the Core Observatory and the Payload Attach Fitting (PAF) are set up in scaffolding in the Encapsulation Hall. Then, the fairing is lifted above and lowered onto the fitting. When only a few feet remain above the final position, stanchions support the fairing while technicians go inside to complete the electrical connections. When this is completed, they remove the stanchions and lower the fairing to its final position, where it is bolted in place.    Fairing Encapsulation Compete

Footage courtesy of JAXA/MHI

On Feb. 11, the Core Observatory was moved into the spacecraft fairing assembly building and into the Encapsulation Hall. Final inspections and preparations were completed for the installation into the fairing, which began on Feb 13. The fairing is the part of the rocket that will contain the spacecraft at the top of the H-IIA rocket.

The encapsulation process for the H-IIA is very different than for most U.S. rockets. For U.S. rockets, the fairing is usually in two pieces that close around the payload like a clamshell. To install the GPM Core Observatory into the fairing of the H-IIA rocket, first the Core Observatory and the Payload Attach Fitting (PAF) are set up in scaffolding in the Encapsulation Hall. Then, the fairing is lifted above and lowered onto the fitting. When only a few feet remain above the final position, stanchions support the fairing while technicians go inside to complete the electrical connections. When this is completed, they remove the stanchions and lower the fairing to its final position, where it is bolted in place.
Duration: 1.1 minutes
Available formats:
  640x360 (29.97 fps) QT         30 MB
  640x360 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   12 MB
  960x540 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   31 MB
  320x240 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   6 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) WMV         36 MB
  720x480 (29.97 fps) WMV         33 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         99 MB
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         1 GB
  960x540 (29.97 fps) WEBM         14 MB
  1024x576   JPEG         112 KB
  320x180     PNG           95 KB
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Waiting for Launch    Waiting for Launch
Duration: 2.5 minutes
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Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11487
Animation Number:11487
Completed:2014-02-20
Animator:Walt Feimer (HTSI) (Lead)
Video Editors:Ryan Fitzgibbons (USRA)
 Michael Starobin (HTSI)
Producers:Ryan Fitzgibbons (USRA)
 Michael Starobin (HTSI)
Project Support:Aaron E Lepsch (ADNET Systems, Inc.)
Videographer:Michael Starobin (HTSI)
Writer:Ellen T. Gray (ADNET Systems, Inc.)
Series:Narrated Movies
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
 
Keywords:
SVS >> GPM
SVS >> HDTV
GCMD >> Location >> Japan
SVS >> Launch
NASA Science >> Earth
SVS >> JAXA
SVS >> Tanegashima
 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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