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Enhancing The Extremes

iPad story cover image: Wet places become wetter and dry places become drier under America's future climate.
Climate change is expected to bring about warmer temperatures in most places around the globe. But the situation with rainfall and snow is different. As Earth warms due to rising levels of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, scientists expect existing precipitation patterns in many cases to become more extreme. In short, rainy regions will see more rain, and dry regions will become drier. Two climate scenarios—one where global carbon dioxide levels reach 550 parts per million (ppm) by the year 2100, and another where levels rise to 800 ppm—were analyzed to see how such changes could affect different parts of the U.S. The analysis was performed for the National Climate Assessment, a U.S. Global Change Research Program effort to study and help the nation prepare for climate change. Watch the videos to see how precipitation patterns in the U.S. could change under each scenario.
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Another multimedia item related to this story:
     National Climate Assessment: 21st Century Precipitation Scenarios (id 4028)

Wet places become wetter and dry places become drier under America's future climate.    Wet places become wetter and dry places become drier under America's future climate.

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  1280 x 720       JPEG   432 KB
  1024 x 576       JPEG (designed for iPad) 309 KB
  1024 x 576       JPEG   149 KB
  320 x 180         PNG       82 KB


This video shows precipitation changes based on a scenario in which carbon dioxide levels reach about 550 ppm.    This video shows precipitation changes based on a scenario in which carbon dioxide levels reach about 550 ppm.
Duration: 38.2 seconds
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  1920x1080 JPEG         694 KB
  1280x720   JPEG         410 KB
  1920x1080 TIFF         3 MB
  1024x576   JPEG (designed for iPad) 301 KB
  960x540     WEBM         3 MB
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This video shows precipitation changes based on a scenario in which carbon dioxide levels reach about 800 ppm.    This video shows precipitation changes based on a scenario in which carbon dioxide levels reach about 800 ppm.
Duration: 38.2 seconds
Available formats:
  Transport Streams
  960x540     MPEG-4   6 MB
  1024x576   JPEG (designed for iPad) 301 KB
  1920x1080 TIFF         3 MB
  1280x720   JPEG         410 KB
  1920x1080 JPEG         699 KB
  960x540     WEBM         4 MB
How to play our movies


By 2050, the low-emissions scenario (550 ppm CO2) shows widespread precipitation changes across the continental U.S.    By 2050, the low-emissions scenario (550 ppm CO2) shows widespread precipitation changes across the continental U.S.

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  1920 x 1080     JPEG   618 KB
  1024 x 576       JPEG (designed for iPad) 304 KB


By 2050 in the high-emissions scenario (800 ppm CO2), the Northeast has become wetter and the Southwest has become drier.    By 2050 in the high-emissions scenario (800 ppm CO2), the Northeast has become wetter and the Southwest has become drier.

Available formats:
  1024 x 576       JPEG (designed for iPad) 313 KB
  1920 x 1080     JPEG   630 KB
  1280 x 720       JPEG   417 KB


By 2100, the low-emissions scenario (550 ppm CO2, left) and high-emissions scenario (800 ppm CO2, right) show dramatic precipitation changes.    By 2100, the low-emissions scenario (550 ppm CO2, left) and high-emissions scenario (800 ppm CO2, right) show dramatic precipitation changes.

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  1280 x 720       JPEG   692 KB
  1920 x 1080     JPEG       1 MB
  1024 x 576       JPEG (designed for iPad) 494 KB

Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11281
Animation Number:11281
Completed:2013-07-17
Animator:Greg Shirah (NASA/GSFC)
Producer:Allison Leidner (USRA)
Scientists:Kenneth Kunkel (NOAA/NCDC,CICS-NC)
 Brooke Stewart (NOAA/NCDC,CICS-NC)
 Laura Stevens (NOAA/NCDC, CICS-NC)
 Anne Waple (NOAA)
Project Support:Andrew Buddenburg (NOAA/NCDC,CICS-NC)
Writer:Patrick Lynch (Wyle Information Systems)
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
 
Keywords:
SVS >> iPad
NASA Science >> Earth
 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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