Planets and Moons 

The Path of Comet ISON

Comet C/2012 S1, better known as comet ISON, may become a dazzling sight as it traverses the inner solar system in late 2013. During the weeks before its Nov. 28 close approach to the sun, the comet will be observable with small telescopes, and binoculars. Observatories around the world and in space will track the comet during its fiery trek around the sun. If ISON survives its searing solar passage, which seems likely but is not certain, the comet may be visible to the unaided eye in the pre-dawn sky during December.

Watch the animations on this page to visualize ISON's voyage through the inner solar system, or build the paper model of its orbit to track the changing positions of Earth and the comet.

Like all comets, ISON is a clump of frozen gases mixed with dust. Often described as "dirty snowballs," comets emit gas and dust whenever they venture near enough to the sun that the icy material transforms from a solid to gas, a process called sublimation. Jets powered by sublimating ice also release dust, which reflects sunlight and brightens the comet.

On Nov. 28, ISON will make a sweltering passage around the sun. The comet will approach within about 730,000 miles (1.2 million km) of its visible surface, which classifies ISON as a sungrazing comet. In late November, its icy material will furiously sublimate and release torrents of dust as the surface erodes under the sun's fierce heat, all as sun-monitoring satellites look on. Around this time, the comet may become bright enough to glimpse just by holding up a hand to block the sun's glare.

Sungrazing comets often shed large fragments or even completely disrupt following close encounters with the sun, but for ISON neither fate is a forgone conclusion.

Following ISON's solar swingby, the comet will depart the sun and move toward Earth, appearing in morning twilight through December. The comet will swing past Earth on Dec. 26, approaching within 39.9 million miles (64.2 million km) or about 167 times farther than the moon.

The comet was discovered on Sept 21, 2012, by Russian astronomers Vitali Nevski and Artyom Novichonok using a telescope of the International Scientific Optical Network (ISON) located near Kislovodsk.

Learn more about sungrazing comets.


Related Media


For More Information

http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/smallworlds/cometison.cfm

http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/timeline-of-comet-ison-s-dangerous-journey/

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/swift/bursts/ison.html


Related Documentation

Paper_Model_of_Comet_ISONs_Orbit.pdf

Credits

Tom Bridgman (GST): Lead Animator
Scott Wiessinger (USRA): Video Editor
Scott Wiessinger (USRA): Producer
Francis Reddy (Syneren Technologies): Writer
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Short URL to share this page:
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11222

This item is part of these series:
Narrated Movies
Astrophysics Visualizations
Astrophysics Stills
Comet ISON's Journey into the Light

Goddard TV Tape:
G2013-030 -- Comet ISON

Keywords:
SVS >> Comet
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Sun
SVS >> Hyperwall
SVS >> Heliophysics
NASA Science >> Planets and Moons
SVS >> Sungrazer
SVS >> Sungrazing Comets