Planets and Moons 

Jupiter's Hot Spots

Jupiter's bright Equatorial Zone swirls with dark patches, dubbed "hot spots" for their infrared glow. These holes in the ammonia clouds at the top of the atmosphere allow a glimpse into Jupiter's darker, hotter layers below. In 1995 NASA's Galileo spacecraft dropped a probe directly into a hot spot, taking the first and only in situ measurements of Jupiter's atmosphere. Now, movies recorded by NASA's Cassini spacecraft reveal that hot spots are not just local weather phenomena, but are in fact linked to much larger-scale atmospheric structures called Rossby waves.


For More Information

http://arxiv.org/abs/1302.0277

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0019103513000407


Credits

Tom Bridgman (GST): Lead Animator
Greg Shirah (NASA/GSFC): Animator
Ernie Wright (USRA): Animator
Trent L. Schindler (USRA): Animator
Lori Perkins (NASA/GSFC): Animator
Dan Gallagher (USRA): Video Editor
David Choi (Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU)): Interviewee
Dan Gallagher (USRA): Producer
David Choi (Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU)): Scientist
Rob Andreoli (AIMM): Videographer
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and Cassini Mission Team, NASA JPL

Science Paper:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0019103513000407

Short URL to share this page:
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11204

Mission:
Galileo

Data Used:
Cassini/Imaging Science Subsystem

This item is part of this series:
Narrated Movies

Goddard TV Tape:
G2012-099 -- Jupiter's Hot Spots

Keywords:
SVS >> Atmosphere
SVS >> Galileo
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Infrared
SVS >> Jupiter
SVS >> Cassini
NASA Science >> Planets and Moons
SVS >> Rossby Wave
SVS >> Hot Spot