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January 31, 2013 CME and Prominence Eruption

On Jan. 31, 2013 at 2:09am EST, the sun erupted with an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection or CME. Experimental NASA research models, based on observations from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and ESA/NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, show that the CME left the sun at speeds of around 575 miles per second, which is a fairly typical speed for CMEs. Historically, CMEs at this speed are mild.

Not to be confused with a solar flare, a CME is a solar phenomenon that can send solar particles into space and reach Earth one to three days later.

Earth-directed CMEs can cause a space weather phenomenon called a geomagnetic storm, which occurs when they connect with the outside of the Earth's magnetic envelope, the magnetosphere, for an extended period of time. In the past, CME's such as this have caused auroras near the poles but didn't disrupt electrical systems on Earth or interfere with GPS or satellite-based communications systems.

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More information on this topic available at:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/news/News013113-cme.html

The CME included a large prominence eruption most visible in light with a wavelength of 304 angstroms.  SDO captured this footage from 3:00 to 9:00 Universal Time.  In this video, the imaging cadence is one frame every 36 seconds.    The CME included a large prominence eruption most visible in light with a wavelength of 304 angstroms. SDO captured this footage from 3:00 to 9:00 Universal Time. In this video, the imaging cadence is one frame every 36 seconds.
Duration: 1.0 minutes
Available formats:
  1920x1080 (29.97 fps) QT         1 GB
  1920x1080 (29.97 fps) QT         1 GB
  1920x1080 (29.97 fps) QT         436 MB
  640x360 (29.97 fps) QT         132 MB
  1920x1080 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   91 MB
  960x720 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   36 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         30 MB
  640x360 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   10 MB
  1920x1080 JPEG         2 MB
  320x180     PNG           237 KB
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The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured these image of a coronal mass ejection (CME), erupting on the left side of the sun early in the morning of  Jan 31, 2013,  as it was moving away from the sun into space. These images from SOHO are called coronagraphs, in which the bright light of the sun is blocked in order to make the dimmer structures in the sun's atmosphere, or corona, visible. Credit: ESA&NASA/SOHO    The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured these image of a coronal mass ejection (CME), erupting on the left side of the sun early in the morning of Jan 31, 2013, as it was moving away from the sun into space. These images from SOHO are called coronagraphs, in which the bright light of the sun is blocked in order to make the dimmer structures in the sun's atmosphere, or corona, visible.

Credit: ESA&NASA/SOHO

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  1024 x 1500     JPEG       2 MB


The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured these image of a coronal mass ejection (CME), erupting on the left side of the sun early in the morning of  Jan 31, 2013,  as it was moving away from the sun into space. These images from SOHO are called coronagraphs, in which the bright light of the sun is blocked in order to make the dimmer structures in the sun's atmosphere, or corona, visible. No Labels. Credit: ESA&NASA/SOHO    The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured these image of a coronal mass ejection (CME), erupting on the left side of the sun early in the morning of Jan 31, 2013, as it was moving away from the sun into space. These images from SOHO are called coronagraphs, in which the bright light of the sun is blocked in order to make the dimmer structures in the sun's atmosphere, or corona, visible. No Labels.

Credit: ESA&NASA/SOHO

Available formats:
  1024 x 1500     JPEG       2 MB


SOHO LASCO C3 image of CME.    SOHO LASCO C3 image of CME.

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  1024 x 1024     JPEG   762 KB


Solar Dynamics Observatory AIA instrument imagery at 304 Angstrom wavelength.  This group contains a 4096x4096 pixel Apple ProRes video, and 4096x4096 frames.    Solar Dynamics Observatory AIA instrument imagery at 304 Angstrom wavelength. This group contains a 4096x4096 pixel Apple ProRes video, and 4096x4096 frames.
Duration: 19.8 seconds
Available formats:
  4096x4096 QT         2 GB
  4096x4096 Frames
  4096x4096 TIFF         11 MB
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Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11201
Animation Number:11201
Completed:2013-01-31
Animator:Tom Bridgman (GST) (Lead)
Video Editor:Scott Wiessinger (USRA)
Producer:Scott Wiessinger (USRA)
Writer:Karen Fox (ASI)
Platforms/Sensors/Data Sets:SDO
 SDO/AIA/304 Filter
 SOHO
 SOHO/Large Angle Spectrometric COronagraph (LASCO)
Series:Heliophysics Breaking News
Goddard TV Tape:G2013-021 -- 2013 Heliophysics Breaking News
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO
 
Keywords:
SVS >> CME
SVS >> Coronal Mass Ejection
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Solar Ultraviolet
SVS >> Sun
GCMD >> Earth Science >> Sun-earth Interactions
SVS >> Space Weather
SVS >> SDO
SVS >> Edited Feature
SVS >> Solar Dynamics Observatory
SVS >> Heliophysics
SVS >> Corona
 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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