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Total Solar Eclipse Viewed from Australia

On Nov. 13, 2012, a narrow corridor in the southern hemisphere experienced a total solar eclipse. The corridor lay mostly over the ocean but also cut across the northern tip of Australia where both professional and amateur astronomers gathered to watch.

During a solar eclipse one can see — using appropriate instruments to protect the eyes since you should never look at the sun directly — dim structures around the edges of the sun. These structures are the sun's atmosphere, the corona, which extends beyond the more easily seen surface, known as the photosphere.

In modern times, we know that the corona is constantly on the move. Made of electrified gas, called plasma, the solar material dances in response to huge magnetic fields on the sun. Structural changes in these magnetic fields can also give rise to giant explosions of radiation called solar flares, or expulsions of solar material called coronal mass ejections, CMEs — which make the corona a particularly interesting area to study.

Hinode is a joint JAXA/NASA mission to study the connections of the Sun's surface magnetism, primarily in and around sunspots. The orbit of Hinode resulted in two eclipses this time, each with a somewhat different perspective. The first eclipse was total. During the second, the moon skimmed the left limb of the sun for a partial eclipse.

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Movie of the total solar eclipse of Nov. 13, 2012. Credit:  CNES/CNRS/NASA    Movie of the total solar eclipse of Nov. 13, 2012.

Credit: CNES/CNRS/NASA
Duration: 2.2 minutes
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  640x424 (24 fps) QT         470 MB
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  960x540 (24 fps) WEBM         3 MB
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A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona. Courtesy of Romeo Durscher    A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona.

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher

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  4288 x 2848     JPEG       3 MB
  320 x 180         PNG       55 KB


The JAXA/NASA Hinode mission witnessed two solar eclipses on Nov. 13, 2012, near in time to when a solar eclipse was visible in the southern hemisphere.  This movie shows the first, a total eclipse. Credit: JAXA/NASA/SAO    The JAXA/NASA Hinode mission witnessed two solar eclipses on Nov. 13, 2012, near in time to when a solar eclipse was visible in the southern hemisphere. This movie shows the first, a total eclipse.

Credit: JAXA/NASA/SAO
Duration: 8.7 seconds
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  1024x1024 (6 fps) QT         126 MB
  1024x1024 (6 fps) QT         24 MB
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The second of two solar eclipses witnessed on Nov. 13, 2012 by Hinode, in which the moon skims the left limb of the sun for a partial eclipse. Credit: JAXA/NASA/SAO    The second of two solar eclipses witnessed on Nov. 13, 2012 by Hinode, in which the moon skims the left limb of the sun for a partial eclipse.

Credit: JAXA/NASA/SAO
Duration: 8.5 seconds
Available formats:
  1024x1024 (6 fps) QT         36 MB
  1024x1024 (6 fps) QT         25 MB
  1024x1024 (6 fps) QT         3 MB
  1024x1024 PNG           727 KB
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A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona. Credit: CNES/CNRS/NASA    A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona.

Credit: CNES/CNRS/NASA

Available formats:
  744 x 558         PNG     114 KB


A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona. Credit:  CNES/CNRS/NASA    A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona.

Credit: CNES/CNRS/NASA

Available formats:
  744 x 558         PNG     114 KB


A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona. Credit:  CNES/CNRS/NASA    A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona.

Credit: CNES/CNRS/NASA

Available formats:
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Viewing the total solar eclipse from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. Courtesy of Romeo Durscher    Viewing the total solar eclipse from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST.

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher

Available formats:
  4288 x 2848     JPEG       4 MB


Clouds partially hide the solar eclipse. Courtesy of Romeo Durscher    Clouds partially hide the solar eclipse.

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher

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Clouds obscure the total solar eclipse on Nov. 13, 2012. Courtesy of Romeo Durscher    Clouds obscure the total solar eclipse on Nov. 13, 2012.

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher

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  4288 x 2848     JPEG       4 MB


A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona. Courtesy of Romeo Durscher    A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona.

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher

Available formats:
  4288 x 2848     JPEG       5 MB


A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona. Courtesy of Romeo Durscher    A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. The light halo visible around the edges of the moon is the sun's atmosphere, the corona.

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher

Available formats:
  4288 x 2848     JPEG       4 MB


A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST. Courtesy of Romeo Durscher    A total solar eclipse was visible from the Northern tip of Australia on Nov. 13, 2012 at 3:35 EST.

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher

Available formats:
  2016 x 1338     JPEG   748 KB

Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11133
Animation Number:11133
Completed:2012-11-14
Producer:Scott Wiessinger (USRA)
Writer:Karen Fox (ASI)
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. However, individual images should be credited as indicated above.
 
Keywords:
SVS >> Moon
SVS >> Solar Eclipse
SVS >> Sun
SVS >> Heliophysics
SVS >> Corona
NASA Science >> Sun
NASA Science >> Planets and Moons
 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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