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A Young Star Flaunts its X-ray Spots

Using combined data from a trio of orbiting X-ray telescopes, including NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Japan-led Suzaku satellite, astronomers have obtained a rare glimpse of the powerful phenomena that accompany a still-forming star. A new study based on these observations indicates that intense magnetic fields drive torrents of gas into the stellar surface, where they heat large areas to millions of degrees. X-rays emitted by these hot spots betray the newborn star's rapid rotation.

Astronomers first took notice of the young star, known as V1647 Orionis, in January 2004, near the peak of an outburst. The eruption had brightened the star so much that it illuminated a conical patch of dust now known as McNeil's Nebula. Both the star and the nebula are located about 1,300 light-years away in the constellation Orion.

Astronomers quickly determined that V1647 Ori was a protostar, a stellar infant still partly swaddled in its birth cloud. Protostars have not yet developed the energy-generating capabilities of a normal star such as the sun, which fuses hydrogen into helium in its core. For V1647 Ori, that stage lies millions of years in the future. Until then, the protostar shines from the heat energy released by the gas that continues to fall onto it, much of which originates in a rotating circumstellar disk.

The mass of V1647 Ori is likely only about 80 percent of the sun's, but its low density bloats it to nearly five times the sun's size. Infrared measurements show that most of the star's surface has a temperature around 6,400 degrees Fahrenheit (3,500 C), or about a third cooler than the sun's.

Yet during outbursts, the protostar's X-ray brightness increases by 100 times and the temperature of its X-ray-emitting regions reaches about 90 million F (50 million C).

The team found strong similarities among 11 separate X-ray light curves based on data from Chandra, Suzaku and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton satellites. These similarities allowed them to identify cyclic X-ray variations establishing that the star spins once each day. V1647 Ori is among the youngest stars whose spin rates have been determined using an X-ray-based technique.

The cyclic X-ray changes represent the appearance and disappearance of hot regions on the star that rotate in and out of view. The model that best agrees with the observations, say the researchers, involves two hot spots of unequal brightness located on opposite sides of the star. Both spots are thought to be pancake-shaped areas about the size of the sun, but the more southerly spot is about five times brighter.

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More information on this topic available at:
http://www.nasa.gov/topics/universe/features/xray-flaunt.html

Short narrated video and print-resolution still.    Short narrated video and print-resolution still.

For complete transcript, click here.
Duration: 1.5 minutes
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Animation of star and print-resolution still of side view.    Animation of star and print-resolution still of side view.
Duration: 50.1 seconds
Available formats:
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         933 MB
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         56 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         30 MB
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  960x540 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   23 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) WMV         12 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         7 MB
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Periodic X-ray emission (yellow line) from V1647 Ori is best explained as the combined X-ray output of a pair of hot spots (green and red lines) located on opposite sides of the star. Both of the spots are about the size of the sun, but the southern spot is producing more X-rays. Illustrations across the top show how the changing orientation of the spots correlates to the star's X-ray emission. Crosses indicate the actual X-ray data points.    Periodic X-ray emission (yellow line) from V1647 Ori is best explained as the combined X-ray output of a pair of hot spots (green and red lines) located on opposite sides of the star. Both of the spots are about the size of the sun, but the southern spot is producing more X-rays. Illustrations across the top show how the changing orientation of the spots correlates to the star's X-ray emission. Crosses indicate the actual X-ray data points.

Available formats:
  5092 x 4550     JPEG       3 MB
  1955 x 1747     JPEG   743 KB


Periodic X-ray emission (yellow line) from V1647 Ori is best explained as the combined X-ray output of a pair of hot spots (green and red lines) located on opposite sides of the star. Both of the spots are about the size of the sun, but the southern spot is producing more X-rays. Illustrations across the top show how the changing orientation of the spots correlates to the star's X-ray emission. Crosses indicate the actual X-ray data points. No Labels.    Periodic X-ray emission (yellow line) from V1647 Ori is best explained as the combined X-ray output of a pair of hot spots (green and red lines) located on opposite sides of the star. Both of the spots are about the size of the sun, but the southern spot is producing more X-rays. Illustrations across the top show how the changing orientation of the spots correlates to the star's X-ray emission. Crosses indicate the actual X-ray data points. No Labels.

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  1955 x 1747     JPEG   672 KB


Print-resolution view of artist's interpretation of upper spot.    Print-resolution view of artist's interpretation of upper spot.

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Print-resolution view of artist's interpretation of lower spot.    Print-resolution view of artist's interpretation of lower spot.

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Simple animation of rotating star with X-ray emitting regions and X-ray observations made by XMM-Newton.    Simple animation of rotating star with X-ray emitting regions and X-ray observations made by XMM-Newton.

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The reflection nebula M78 glows because dust grains in the cloud reflect and scatter the light of nearby stars. Dark dusty lanes, the birthing ground of protostars, thread throughout the region. This image was taken in 2006, between V1647 Ori's 2003 - 2005 outburst and before the protostar's next eruption in 2008, which is why McNeil's Nebula is barely visible.  Located some 1,600 light-years away, M78 is part of the vast Orion Complex, a large region of star-forming gas and dust. Credit: T. A. Rector/Univ. of Alaska Anchorage, H. Schweiker/WIYN and NOAO/AURA/NSF    The reflection nebula M78 glows because dust grains in the cloud reflect and scatter the light of nearby stars. Dark dusty lanes, the birthing ground of protostars, thread throughout the region. This image was taken in 2006, between V1647 Ori's 2003 - 2005 outburst and before the protostar's next eruption in 2008, which is why McNeil's Nebula is barely visible. Located some 1,600 light-years away, M78 is part of the vast Orion Complex, a large region of star-forming gas and dust.

Credit: T. A. Rector/Univ. of Alaska Anchorage, H. Schweiker/WIYN and NOAO/AURA/NSF

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The protostar V1647 Orionis resides at the tip of a conical glow called McNeil's Nebula, which was discovered in January 2004 near the peak of an outburst. This image, from the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini Telescope in Hawaii, shows the nebula as it appeared on Feb. 14, 2004. Credit: Gemini Observatory    The protostar V1647 Orionis resides at the tip of a conical glow called McNeil's Nebula, which was discovered in January 2004 near the peak of an outburst. This image, from the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini Telescope in Hawaii, shows the nebula as it appeared on Feb. 14, 2004.

Credit: Gemini Observatory

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Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?10991
Animation Number:10991
Completed:2012-05-16
Animator:Scott Wiessinger (USRA) (Lead)
Narrator:Joycelyn Thomson Jones (NASA/GSFC)
Producer:Scott Wiessinger (USRA)
Scientist:Kenji Hamaguchi (UMBC)
Writers:Scott Wiessinger (USRA)
 Francis Reddy (Syneren Technologies)
Series:Narrated Movies
 Astrophysics Animations
 Astrophysics Stills
 Astrophysics Features
Goddard TV Tape:G2012-049 -- Hot Spot Star
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. However, individual images should be credited as indicated above.
 
Keywords:
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Music
SVS >> X-ray
SVS >> Astrophysics
SVS >> Edited Feature
SVS >> Space
DLESE >> Narrated
SVS >> Star
SVS >> Nebula
 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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