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Voyager Heliosheath Bubbles Animations

Animations showing the new Voyager findings about the magnetic field in the heliosheath.

For more videos and stills about the Voyager magnetic bubbles discovery, go here.

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Shorter, simpler version of new heliospheric scenario animation.    Shorter, simpler version of new heliospheric scenario animation.
Duration: 41.7 seconds
Available formats:
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         715 MB
  1280x720 (60 fps) Frames (Bubbles Shorter)
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         273 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         23 MB
  1280x720 (30 fps) QT         22 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) WMV         21 MB
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         11 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   10 MB
  1280x720   TIFF         3 MB
  1280x720   JPEG         882 KB
  960x540 (29.97 fps) WEBM         9 MB
  320x180     PNG           243 KB
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This animation summarizes the new heliospheric scenario and the formation of the    This animation summarizes the new heliospheric scenario and the formation of the "sea" of bubbles in the heliosheath. The sun's magnetic field points toward the sun in the northen hemisphere and away from the sun in the southern (shown in red and blue). These oppositely pointing magnetic fields are separated by a layer of current called the heliospheric current sheet. Due to the tilt of the magnetic axis in relation to the axis of rotation of the sun, the heliospheric current sheet flaps like a flag in the wind. The flapping current sheet separates regions of oppositely pointing magnetic field, called sectors. As the solar wind speed decreases past the termination shock, the sectors squeeze together, bringing regions of opposite magnetic field closer to each other. When the separation of sectors becomes very small, the sectored magnetic field breaks up into a sea of nested "magnetic bubbles" in a phenomenon called magnetic reconnection. The region of nested bubbles is carried by the solar wind to the north and south, filling out the entire front region of the heliopause and the sector region in the heliosheath.
Duration: 50.0 seconds
Available formats:
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         869 MB
  1280x720 (60 fps) Frames (Heliosphere)
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         294 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         34 MB
  1280x720 (30 fps) QT         24 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) WMV         22 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   13 MB
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         11 MB
  1280x720   TIFF         3 MB
  1280x720   JPEG         943 KB
  960x540 (29.97 fps) WEBM         12 MB
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This animation depicts the effect of the new scenario on galactic cosmic rays.  The heliospheric boundaries are very important in shielding the inner solar system from the galactic cosmic ray flux.  The heliopause, the last region that separates us from the rest of the galaxy, acts more like a membrane that is permeable to galactic cosmic rays than a shield that deflects those energetic particles.  The galactic cosmic rays slowly wander into the heliosphere and can get trapped in the sea of magnetic bubbles.  Eventually they access the solar magnetic field lines that connect back to the sun, and can move quickly towards the sun and Earth.    This animation depicts the effect of the new scenario on galactic cosmic rays. The heliospheric boundaries are very important in shielding the inner solar system from the galactic cosmic ray flux. The heliopause, the last region that separates us from the rest of the galaxy, acts more like a membrane that is permeable to galactic cosmic rays than a shield that deflects those energetic particles. The galactic cosmic rays slowly wander into the heliosphere and can get trapped in the sea of magnetic bubbles. Eventually they access the solar magnetic field lines that connect back to the sun, and can move quickly towards the sun and Earth.
Duration: 16.0 seconds
Available formats:
  1920x1080 (59.94 fps) QT         522 MB
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         270 MB
  1920x1080 (60 fps) Frames
  1920x1080 (59.94 fps) QT         163 MB
  1920x1080 (29.97 fps) QT         24 MB
  1920x1080 (30 fps) QT         10 MB
  1920x1080 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   10 MB
  1920x1080 (59.94 fps) QT         5 MB
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         88 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         12 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) WMV         8 MB
  1280x720 (30 fps) QT         9 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   4 MB
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         4 MB
  1920x1080 TIFF         5 MB
  1920x1080 JPEG         521 KB
  960x540 (29.97 fps) WEBM         3 MB
How to play our movies


This animation shows the Voyager 2 observations of energetic electrons.  Voyager 2 detected a dramatic drop of the flux of electrons as it left the sector region.  The intense flux came back as soon as Voyager 2 was inside the sector region again.  Energetic particles have a hard time    This animation shows the Voyager 2 observations of energetic electrons. Voyager 2 detected a dramatic drop of the flux of electrons as it left the sector region. The intense flux came back as soon as Voyager 2 was inside the sector region again. Energetic particles have a hard time "navigating" through the sea of bubbles. The bubbles act like traps for these particles. When particles escape the sea of bubbles and access the field lines that connect back to the sun, they quickly escape along the magnetic field lines, very much like entering a highway. These observations were the unexpected signature of the new scenario.
Duration: 10.0 seconds
Available formats:
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         134 MB
  1280x720 (60 fps) Frames (Detection)
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         10 MB
  1280x720 (30 fps) QT         5 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         2 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) WMV         2 MB
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         2 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   1 MB
  1280x720   TIFF         3 MB
  1280x720   JPEG         436 KB
  960x540 (59.94 fps) WEBM         1 MB
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Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?10791
Animation Number:10791
Completed:2011-06-05
Animators:Walt Feimer (HTSI) (Lead)
 Michael Lentz (UMBC)
 Chris Smith (HTSI)
 Tom Bridgman (GST)
Producer:Scott Wiessinger (USRA)
Scientist:Merav Opher (Boston University)
Series:Voyager and the Heliopause
Goddard TV Tape:G2011-050 -- Voyager Magnetic Bubbles
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Conceptual Image Lab
 
Keywords:
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Heliosphere
SVS >> Spacecraft
SVS >> Sun
GCMD >> Earth Science >> Sun-earth Interactions >> Solar Activity >> Cosmic Rays
SVS >> Heliopause
SVS >> Voyager
SVS >> Heliosheath
SVS >> Heliophysics
SVS >> Spacecraft >> Voyager
NASA Science >> Sun
 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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