Universe 

Vela Pulsar in Gamma Rays

This movie shows pulsed gamma rays from the Vela pulsar as constructed from photons detected by Fermi's Large Area Telescope. The Vela pulsar, which spins 11 times a second, is the brightest persistent source of gamma rays in the sky. The movie includes data from August 4 to Sept. 15, 2008. The bluer color in the latter part of the pulse indicates the presence of gamma rays with energies exceeding a billion electron volts (1 GeV). For comparison, visible light has energies between two and three electron volts. Red indicates gamma rays with energies less than 300 million electron volts (MeV); green, gamma rays between 300 MeV and 1 GeV; and blue shows gamma rays greater than 1 GeV. The movie frame is 30 degrees across. The background, which shows diffuse gamma-ray emission from the Milky Way, is about 15 times brighter here than it actually is.


For More Information

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/GLAST/main/index.html


Credits

Roger Romani (Stanford University): Lead Animator
Roger Romani (Stanford University): Scientist
Lucas Guillemot (CENBG): Scientist
Francis Reddy (SPSYS): Writer
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration

Short URL to share this page:
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?10426

Missions:
Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope
GLAST
Swift

Data Used:
Swift None

This item is part of this series:
Astrophysics Visualizations

Keywords:
SVS >> Gamma Ray
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Astrophysics
SVS >> Universe
SVS >> Pulsar
SVS >> GLAST
SVS >> Gamma Ray Observatory
SVS >> Fermi
NASA Science >> Universe