Universe 

Fermi All-sky Movie Shows Flaring, Fading Blazars

This all-sky movie shows counts of gamma rays with energies greater than 300 million electron volts from August 4 to October 30, 2008, detected by Fermi's Large Area Telescope. Brighter colors indicate brighter gamma-ray sources. The circles show the northern (left) and southern galactic sky. Their edges lie along the plane of our galaxy, the Milky Way.

Because this is an unusual view of the sky, the movies first overlay the stars and establish the locations of well- known constellations: Ursa Major (which includes the Big Dipper), Boötes, and Virgo in the northern galactic map; Cetus, Aries, and Pegasus in the southern galactic map. Notable gamma-ray sources include the sun (moving through the northern sky), the gamma-ray-only pulsar PSR J1836+5925 — a member of a new pulsar class discovered by Fermi — and numerous blazars (active galaxies). The blazars 3C 273, AO 0235+164, and PKS 1502+106 are highlighted.


For More Information

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/GLAST/news/flare_fade.html


Credits

Jean Ballet (CEA Saclay): Lead Animator
Cruz deWilde (Avant Gravity): Animator
Walt Feimer (HTSI): Animator
Stefanie Misztal (UMBC): Producer
Jean Ballet (CEA Saclay): Scientist
Elizabeth Hays (NASA/GSFC): Scientist
Steven Ritz (NASA/GSFC): Scientist
Francis Reddy (SPSYS): Writer
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration

Short URL to share this page:
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?10407

Missions:
Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope
GLAST

Data Used:
Fermi None
Fermi/LAT None

This item is part of this series:
Astrophysics Visualizations

Keywords:
SVS >> Gamma Ray
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Gamma Ray Burst
SVS >> Astrophysics
SVS >> Universe
SVS >> Pulsar
SVS >> GLAST
SVS >> Constellation
SVS >> Gamma Ray Observatory
SVS >> Fermi
SVS >> Blazar
NASA Science >> Universe