Volcanic Ash Still Image

Aerosols are complex particles; they can occur in nature but can also be generated by humans. One source of naturally-occurring aerosols is volcanoes. Large-scale volcanic activity may last only a few days, but the massive outpouring of gases and ash can influence climate patterns for years. Sulfuric gases convert to sulfate aerosols, sub-micron droplets containing about 75 percent sulfuric acid. Following eruptions, these aerosol particles can linger as long as three to four years in the stratosphere. Still image courtesy of United States Geological Survey.

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G2008-047 -- Glory Resource Reel

SVS >> Aerosols
DLESE >> Atmospheric science
SVS >> Climate
SVS >> Earth Science
DLESE >> Geology
SVS >> Global Warming
DLESE >> Natural hazards
DLESE >> Structural geology
SVS >> Volcano
GCMD >> Earth Science >> Atmosphere >> Aerosols
GCMD >> Earth Science >> Solid Earth >> Volcanoes
SVS >> Climate Change
SVS >> Glory
NASA Science >> Earth

GCMD keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation: Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version