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Fermi's LAT Instrument

Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) detects particles produced in a physical process known as pair production that epitomizes Einstein's famous equation, E=mc2. When a gamma ray, which is pure energy (E), slams into a layer of tungsten in one of the tracking towers that compose the LAT, it creates mass (m) in the form of a pair of subatomic particles, an electron and its antimatter counterpart, a positron. Several layers of high-precision silicon detectors track the particles as they move through the instrument. The direction of the incoming gamma ray is determined by projecting the particle paths backward. The particles travel through the trackers until they reach a separate detector called a calorimeter, which absorbs and measures their energies. The LAT produces gamma-ray images of astronomical objects, while also determining the energy of each detected gamma ray.
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More information on this topic available at:
http://www.nasa.gov/GLAST

This animation shows a gamma ray (purple) entering a corner tower of the Tracker. After the electron (red) and positron (blue) cascade down the tower, their incoming paths (red/blue) combine to show the original path (purple) of the incoming gamma ray that created them.    This animation shows a gamma ray (purple) entering a corner tower of the Tracker. After the electron (red) and positron (blue) cascade down the tower, their incoming paths (red/blue) combine to show the original path (purple) of the incoming gamma ray that created them.
Duration: 25.4 seconds
Available formats:
  1280x720 (30 fps) QT         2 GB
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         445 MB
  1280x720   Frames
  1280x720 (59.94 fps) QT         335 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         30 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) WMV         16 MB
  1280x720 (30 fps) QT         15 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) QT         15 MB
  960x540 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   12 MB
  1280x720 (29.97 fps) MPEG-4   12 MB
  320x180     PNG           215 KB
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Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?20122
Animation Number:20122
Completed:2007-09-12
Animator:Chris Meaney (HTSI) (Lead)
Scientist:Steven Ritz (NASA/GSFC)
Platforms/Sensors/Data Sets:Fermi None
 Fermi/LAT
Series:GLAST Pre-Launch
 Astrophysics Animations
Goddard TV Tape:G2007-011HD -- GLAST Pre-Launch Resource Tape
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab
 
Keywords:
SVS >> Gamma Ray
SVS >> HDTV
SVS >> Satellite
SVS >> Spacecraft
DLESE >> Space science
SVS >> Gamma Ray Burst
SVS >> Astrophysics
SVS >> Universe
SVS >> GLAST
SVS >> Space
SVS >> Gamma Ray Observatory
SVS >> Fermi
 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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