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Discover-AQ: Targeted Airborne and Ground-Based Observations of Near-Surface Pollution

The project is called DISCOVER-AQ, which stands for Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality. Discover - AQ is a four-year campaign to improve the use of satellites to monitor air quality for public health and environmental benefit. The fundamental challenge for satellites measuring air quality is to distinguish between pollution near the surface and pollution higher in the atmosphere. Scientific questions remain about the vertical distribution of pollutants. How far up in the atmosphere are morning and evening spikes in pollution associated with rush hour noticeable? How does ozone, which peaks near the surface in afternoon, behave at other altitudes throughout the day? When is the best time of the day for satellites to measure various pollutants?

Measurements from aircraft, in combination with ground-based measurements, offer a key perspective that makes such distinctions easier to make. The problem is particularly pronounced for pollutants that are abundant at the surface and higher in the atmosphere. For example, a "Code Red" air-quality day during the summer might produce very high concentrations of ozone in the bottom few kilometers of the atmosphere, yet generate a change of a mere 1 or 2 percent to a total column of ozone. Studies suggest that discrepancies of as much as 30 to 50 percent exist between estimates of ground nitrogen dioxide inferred from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument(OMI), an instrument on NASA's Aura satellite launched in 2004, and measurements from ground-based instruments. DISCOVER-AQ will address such problems by helping researchers develop a three-dimensional view of how air pollutants are distributed and move between different levels of the atmosphere throughout the day.

A phalanx of ground-based instruments will offer a critical view of the same patches of air the aircraft are monitoring from above. While NASA sponsors certain ground instruments, other institutions including the Environmental Protection Agency, the Maryland Department of the Environment, Howard University, and Pennsylvania State University manage the instruments at the ground stations.

Scientists will use information collected during the DISCOVER-AQ campaign to improve measurements from existing satellites and to help establish parameters for future NASA satellite missions that will monitor air quality. More information is available at http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/discover-aq/index.html .

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This animation follows 2 paths of the P-3B aircraft as they collect air quality data during the 2011 Discover-AQ field Campaign.    This animation follows 2 paths of the P-3B aircraft as they collect air quality data during the 2011 Discover-AQ field Campaign.
Duration: 27.3 seconds
Available formats:
  640x360     MPEG-4   4 MB
  1920x1080 MPEG-4   31 MB
  1920x1080 Frames (Composite)
  5760x3240 TIFF         18 MB
  5760x3240 TIFF         18 MB
  320x180     X-FLV       882 KB
  320x180     PNG           89 KB
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This frameset contains the same flight paths without the P-3B Flight Path labels.    This frameset contains the same flight paths without the P-3B Flight Path labels.
Duration: 27.3 seconds
Available formats:
  640x360 (30 fps) MPEG-4   4 MB
  1920x1080 (60 fps) MPEG-4   32 MB
  1920x1080 (30 fps) Frames (EarthLayer)
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  320x180 (30 fps) X-FLV       880 KB
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This frameset only contains the P-3B flight paths, city labels, and road signs.    This frameset only contains the P-3B flight paths, city labels, and road signs.
Duration: 27.3 seconds
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The low-altitude P-3B flights will be easily viewable along the Interstate 95/Baltimore-Washington Parkway traffic corridor from the Washington Beltway northeast to Baltimore and continuing on to the Delaware State line. The flight path will also pass over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge near Annapolis.    The low-altitude P-3B flights will be easily viewable along the Interstate 95/Baltimore-Washington Parkway traffic corridor from the Washington Beltway northeast to Baltimore and continuing on to the Delaware State line. The flight path will also pass over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge near Annapolis.

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Label for the low-altitude P-3B flight Path    Label for the low-altitude P-3B flight Path

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Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?3845
Animation Number:3845
Completed:2011-06-22
Animators:Lori Perkins (NASA/GSFC) (Lead)
 Helen-Nicole Kostis (USRA)
 Greg Shirah (NASA/GSFC)
Video Editor:Rich Melnick (HTSI)
Producers:Malissa Reyes (USRA)
 Rani Gran (NASA/GSFC)
Scientist:James H. Crawford Ph.D. (NASA/LaRC)
Platform/Sensor/Data Set:Lat-Lon Altitude Flight Coordinates (June 27, 2011 through July 31, 2011)
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio
 
Keywords:
DLESE >> Atmospheric science
SVS >> Baltimore
DLESE >> Environmental science
SVS >> Washington DC
GCMD >> Earth Science >> Atmosphere >> Air Quality
This work has been visible on
http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2011/06/23/nasa-to-fly-over-region-for-air-quality-study/

http://www.star-telegram.com/2011/06/23/3174649/nasa-to-fly-over-region-for-air.html

http://www.pe.com/ap_news/California/MD_NASA_Air_Quality_579915C.shtml

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2011/06/23/state/n113021D08.DTL

http://www.centredaily.com/2011/06/23/2795797/nasa-flights-seek-to-improve-view.html

http://www.ledger-enquirer.com/2011/06/23/1630708/nasa-to-fly-over-region-for-air.html

http://www.times-standard.com/statenews/ci_18338947

http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2011/jun/HQ_11-200_Discovery-AQ.html

http://uspolitics.einnews.com/pr-news/458847-nasa-flights-seek-to-improve-view-of-air-pollution-from-space

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=33932

 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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