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Antarctic Ozone Hole in 2005

A relatively warm Antarctic winter in 2005 kept the thinning of the protective ozone layer over Antarctica, known as the 'ozone hole', slightly smaller than in 2004. The ozone hole is not technically a 'hole' where no ozone is present, but is actually a region of exceptionally depleted ozone in the stratosphere over the Antarctic that happens at the beginning of Southern Hemisphere spring (August-October). The average concentration of ozone in the atmosphere is about 300 Dobson Units; any area where the concentration drops below 220 Dobson Units is considered part of the ozone hole. Each year the 'hole' expands over Antarctica, sometimes reaching populated areas of South America and exposing them to ultraviolet rays normally absorbed by ozone. The data in these omages were acquired by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument on NASA's Aura satellite.
On September 11, 2005, ozone thinning over Antarctica reached its maximum extent for the year at 27 millions of square kilometers. On October 1, 2005 the minimum ozone value was recorded at 102 Dobson Units.
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This animation zooms down to Antarctica and shows the daily ozone readings from July 1, 2005 to October 25,2005.    This animation zooms down to Antarctica and shows the daily ozone readings from July 1, 2005 to October 25,2005.
Duration: 47.0 seconds
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September 11, 2005 -The ozone thinning over Antarctica
reached its maximum extent for the year.    September 11, 2005 -The ozone thinning over Antarctica reached its maximum extent for the year.

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Total Ozone colorbar in dobson units
   Total Ozone colorbar in dobson units

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  320 x 100         PNG         2 KB

Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?3303
Animation Number:3303
Completed:2005-11-01
Animator:Lori Perkins (NASA/GSFC) (Lead)
Scientist:Paul Newman (NASA/GSFC)
Platform/Sensor/Data Set:Aura/OMI/Ozone (2005/07/01 - 2005/10/25)
Data Collected:2005/07/01 - 2005/10/25
Series:Ozone
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Scientific Visualization Studio

Updated Daily from July 1 to Dec 31 at http://ozonewatch.gsfc.nasa.gov
 
Keywords:
SVS >> Antarctic
DLESE >> Atmospheric science
SVS >> Ozone
 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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