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Earth at Night 2001

This is what the Earth looks like at night. Can you find your favorite country or city? Surprisingly, city lights make this task quite possible. Human-made lights highlight particularly developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of Europe, the eastern United States, and Japan. Many large cities are located near rivers or oceans so that they can exchange goods cheaply by boat. Particularly dark areas include the central parts of South America, Africa, Asia, and Australia. The above image is actually a composite of hundreds of pictures made by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) currently operates four satellites carrying the Operational Linescan System (OLS) in low-altitude polar orbits. Three of these satellites record nighttime data. The DMSP-OLS has a unique capability to detect low levels of visible-near infrared (VNIR) radiance at night. With the OLS 'VIS' band data it is possible to detect clouds illuminated by moonlight, plus lights from cities, towns, industrial sites, gas flares, and ephemeral events such as fires and lightning-illuminated clouds.

The Nighttime Lights of the World data set is compiled from the October 1994 - March 1995 DMSP nighttime data collected when moonlight was low. Using the OLS thermal infrared band, areas containing clouds were removed and the remaining area used in the time series. This animation is derived from an image created by Craig Mayhew and Robert Simmon from data provided by Christopher Elvidge of the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center.

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More information on this topic available at:
http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/viewrecord?5826

Human-made lights highlight particularly developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of Europe, the eastern United States, and Japan.    Human-made lights highlight particularly developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of Europe, the eastern United States, and Japan.
Duration: 32.3 seconds
Available formats:
  320x240     MPEG-1   3 MB
  320x240     X-FLV       767 KB
  720x480     DV             110 MB
  640x480     MPEG       6 MB
  720x480     PNG           330 KB
  720x480     PNG           331 KB
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Human-made lights highlight particularly developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of Europe.    Human-made lights highlight particularly developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of Europe.

Available formats:
  2560 x 1920     TIFF       3 MB
  320 x 180         PNG     111 KB


A Flat Earth lets you see human-made lights which are highlighted by developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of Europe, the eastern United States, and Japan.    A Flat Earth lets you see human-made lights which are highlighted by developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of Europe, the eastern United States, and Japan.

Available formats:
  2560 x 1920     TIFF       2 MB


Human-made lights highlight particularly developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of Europe, the eastern United States, and Japan.    Human-made lights highlight particularly developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of Europe, the eastern United States, and Japan.

Available formats:
  2560 x 1920     TIFF       1 MB


Human-made lights highlight particularly developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of the eastern United States.    Human-made lights highlight particularly developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of the eastern United States.

Available formats:
  2560 x 1920     TIFF       3 MB


Video slate image reads,    Video slate image reads, "Earth at Night

Human-made lights highlight particularly developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of Europe, the eastern United States, and Japan. Many large cities are located near rivers or oceans so that they can excange goods cheaply by boat. Particularly dare areas include the central parts of South America, Africa, Asia, and Australia."

Available formats:
  720 x 528         JPEG   127 KB

Short URL to This Page:http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?2276
Animation Number:2276
Completed:2001-10-19
Animators:Stuart A. Snodgrass (GST) (Lead)
 Robert Simmon (SSAI)
 Craig Mayhew (Raytheon)
Scientists:Christopher Elvidge (NOAA/NGDC)
 Marc Imhoff (NASA/GSFC)
Platform/Sensor/Data Set:DMSP/OLS/Earth at Night (1994/10 - 1995/03)
Series:Earth at Night
Video:SVS2001-0023 *
Goddard TV Tapes:G2001-046
 G2003-074
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Scientific Visualization Studio
 
Keywords:
DLESE >> Human geography
SVS >> Lights
SVS >> Night
GCMD >> Earth Science >> Biosphere >> Ecological Dynamics >> Fire Occurrence
 
 


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Many of our multimedia items use the GCMD keywords. These keywords can be found on the Internet with the following citation:
Olsen, L.M., G. Major, K. Shein, J. Scialdone, S. Ritz, T. Stevens, M. Morahan, A. Aleman, R. Vogel, S. Leicester, H. Weir, M. Meaux, S. Grebas, C.Solomon, M. Holland, T. Northcutt, R. A. Restrepo, R. Bilodeau, 2013. NASA/Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Earth Science Keywords. Version 8.0.0.0.0

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